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MARCH 23, 1960 • SIXTY-NiNTH YEAR • 50 CENTS 

Billboard 



The International Music - Record Newsweekly 



mm 



dlo-TV I 



Join Machine Operating 




★ NATIONAL BREAKOUTS 

No National Breakouts This Week. 

★ REGIONAL BREAKOUTS 



These new records, not yet on Billboard's 
Hot 100, have been reported getting strong, 
sales action by dealers in major market(s) 
listed In parentheses. 

FUNNY MAN . . . 

8a/ Stevens, Mercury 72098 
(Lowery, BMI) (Houston, Atlanta, Miami) 

BIRDS THE WORD . . . 

Rlvinotons, liberty 55553 
(Beechwood, BMI) (Los Angeles) 

IF YOU WANNA BE HAPPY . . . 

Jimmy Soul, SPQ8 3305 
(Rockmasters. BMI) (Philadelphia) 

ANY WAY YOU WANTA . . . 

Harvey, Trl-Phl 1017 
(Fuqua, BMI) (Baltimore) 

HEART . . . 

Wayne Newton. Capitol 4920 
(Aldon, BMI) (Houston) 

STRUTTIh" WITH MARIA . . . 

Herb Alport I the Tijuana Brass. 
ASM 706 (Irving, BMI) (Seattle) 

HALF A MAN . . . 

Willie Kelson, Liberty 55532 
(Pamper, BMI) (Dallas-Fort Worth) 

SHOOK UP OVER YOU . . . 

Jimmy (Soul) Clark. Teek 4824 
(Pamtec. BMI) (St. Louis) 

I WANNA BE YOUR LOVER . . . 

Diane Emond. Redcoat 63201 (Sherman- 
DeVoran, BMI) (Mlnneapolis-St. Paul) 

WATERMELON MAN . . . 

Herbie Hancock. Blue Note 1862 
(Aries, BMI) (San Francisco) 

TORE UP . . . 

Harmonica Fats. Darcey 5000 
(Lois. BMI) (Houston) 

THESE ARMS OF MHtt . . . 

Otis Redding, Volt 103 

(East-Time, BMI) (Memphis-Nashville) 



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EDITORIAL 

All Can Be Proud 

XhE RECORD INDUSTRY often has been accused of 
being jaded, cynical and indifferent to anything but the profit motive. 
Yet we are witnessing a development of sheer altruism which is 
unprecedented in the annals of this business and one which precious 
few other industries could match. 

We refer to the united effort being put behind the "All-Star 
Festival" LP. being sold around the world for the benefit of the 
fund of the U. N. High Commissioner for Refugees. The enthusiastic 
co-operation of every segment of the industry behind this most 
worthy cause gives the lie to the old accusations. 

Check off the industry's contributions: the who contributed 
their services, their record companies that released them from exclu- 
sive commitments, the songwriters who prepared material never 
before recorded, the unions which waived royalties, the publishers 
which gave up their normal take, the rack jobbers and distributors 
who are getting the disks to the public sans profit, the dealers who 
display it. and. certainly, the world-wide facilities of Philips and 
Mercury Records which manufactured and arranged for its distribu- 
tion without remuneration. 

Just how exceptional a situation this is may be noted from two 
other facts: this is the first disk ever to be handled by more than 
one of the major record clubs (both the Columbia and Capitol 
clubs are handling it at cost). And. through the U. N. High Com- 
missioner's office, the governments of the world have waived import 
duties and sales tax. 

And so the global drive is on. We wish to urge every part in 
the industry to throw its full weight behind the sale of this LP. By 
so doing, let us wipe out the old canards and show the true nature 
of the record industry to the world: genuinely interest, whole- 
heartedly sincere, completely involved. 

The results will speak for themselves. We hooe to make what 
contribution we can in our own fashion: by reporting the develop- 
ments of the world record industry. 

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. 7 




HIGH HOPES: CBS President Dr. Frank Stanton predicts that In 
five years Columbia record division will be doing as much vol- 
ume overseas as in domestic market. So he tells meeting of 
research staff of Bache & Company as Harld L. Bache, man- 
aging partner of the world-wide investment firm, listens in. 



Nevins-Kirshner 
Sale to Disk Label 
Seems in Offing 

By BOB ROLONTZ 

NEW YORK — The entire Nevins-Kirshner publishing empire, 
including Aldon Music, Dimension Records, and the two-score top 
writers and record producers contracted to Aldon, are expected to 
soon become a part of an established record label operation. The 
labels now in negotiation with Nevins-Kirshner are Colpix and 
United Artists, with reports that 



Colpix has the inside track. It 
is understood that the selling 
price may run between S3 and 
S4 million. 

Though none of the parties 
involved in negotiations was was 
talking very much last week, it 
was gleaned that a deal will 
soon be concluded. When it is, 



the roles to be played by Don 
Kirshner and Al Nevins in the 
new set-up will be clarified, as 
well as the roles of other execu- 
tives in the Nevins-Kirshner set- 
up. 

Under any circumstances, 
(Continued on page 6) 

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BIDS GOING SKY-HIGH 
FOR TRACK ON 'CLEO' 

HOLLYWOOD — The highest offers for a sound track in the 
history of the record business are being received by 20th Century-Fox 
Film Corporation for the score to the most expensive flick ever 
filmed, the $40 million "Cleopatra." These bigs — ranging as high as 
$500,000 — are being made even though the bidders know they have 
only an outside chance to get the track, and even though nobody 
has yet heard the track since it hasn't been completed 

Twentieth-Fox Records chief Basil Bova insist that the track 
will be issued on the firm's label, 20th-Fox Records, not only because 
of the control the picture firm would have in exploiting the track, but 
because it will give a gigantic boost to the label's future. He is 
already planning the cover art. The label will shortly release the 
track to the smash movie "The Longest Day." and reports arc that 
it will also issue the track to "The Sound of Music." 

The record-breaking offers for the "Geo" track are spurred by 
a feeling that this will be a prestige property. Advance ticket sales, 
already running into millions of dollars, indicate that the Elizabeth 
Taylor-Richard Burton publicity will pay off at the box office, and 
the disk firms feel they can cash in as well. Score for the film was 
penned by Alex North. Only 1 5 of "Cleopatra's" 33 reels have been 
recorded at this point. Flick will run for four hours. 
lti:]iit]frHkmiiit>sirTMiririniiiiU][M]|[iii]Mi LiiMHtiibitt!i;!iriii>:sii::i!iLii;Liiiixn liiiuibiTiLinsirtiiicn h riiriiiirii[.<riiHiitSjiiut)is-tiiiiiur 

Al Gallico Leaves Bernstein; 
Turned Down in Partner Bid 

NEW YORK — Al Gallico. veteran music man here, has left 
the Shapiro-Bernstein organization. He had served the firm for a 
decade as general professional manager and only last year started 

S-B's first BMI affiliate. Painted 

singer Merle Kilgorc, writer of 
"Wolvcrton Mountain," the big- 
gest hit for the firm so far. 

The tune was a hit for both 
Claude King and Jo Ann Camp- 
bell and has been recorded in 
27 albums, according to Gallico. 

He will continue to manage 
Kilgorc. Painted Desert also has 
Kilgore's new disk on Parkway. 
"I Am," and Rick Nelson's first 
Decca hit. "You Don't Love Me 
Anymore." 



Desert Music, in Nashville. 

Gallico told Billboard: 
"Frankly, I'm leaving for one 
reason. The Painted Desert firm 
has been highly successful in its 
first year and I felt that I should 
be given a part of the ownership 
of the firm. This they would not 
go along with and so I have 
left. I'll announce my plans very 
soon." 

Painted Desert's Nashville of- 
fice is being run by writer- 



UN Disk Zooms All Over World 



By JACK MAHF.R 

NEW YORK —Early reaction to the 
United Nations "All Star Festival" LP has 
begun to stream in from points around the 
world. The disk, which is being distributed 
by Philips International on a world-wide 
basis, and by Mercury Records in the United 
States, is being hailed in some countries as 
one of the greatest sellers ever. 

The album contains tracks by such inter- 
national stars as Louis Armstrong, Maurice 
Chevalier, Nat Cole. Bing Crosby. Doris 
Day, Ella Fitzgerald. Mahalia Jackson, 
Nana Mouskouri. Patti Page, Luis Albert De 
Parana. Edith Piaf, Anne Shelton and 
Catcrina Valente. The artists, distributors 
and even in some cases dealers, arc all 
realizing little or no profit from the album. 



with the lion's share of the money going to 
the United Nations High Commissioner for 
Refugees for the support of some 13 million 
destitute souls. The album has been put on 
sale in 1 10 countries of the world. 

The Billboard world-wide network of 
correspondents have filed individual stories 
on the sales and special promotions being 
carried out in their individual countries, and 
what effect they have had. 

AUSTRALIA 
By GEORGK HILDER 

The "All Star Festival" album is selling 
here for $3. It has received much special 
consideration from both visiting celebrity 
;irhMs and local dealerships. Nat Cole, who 
has one of the tracks of the LP, made a 
special publicity tour to help promote the 
set. Typical of the consideration on the 



dealer level was Farmer's Department Store. 
Sydney, which set aside a special counter 
and display for the sale of the album. It is 
being sold' in all other States, except West- 
ern Australia, by Mycr Emporium. Ltd. 
There it is being sold by Boans, Ltd. A 
target sale of 20.000 copies has been set 
for Sydney. Besides Cole. Vera Lynn and 
Louis Armstrong are promoting the disk and 
all radio and TV stations are co-operating. 

AUSTRIA 
By I KID ZILLER 

In this country' the "All Star Festival" 
LP was presented to at a special meeting 
attended by Austria Bundespresident Dr. 
Adolf Schaerf and deputy UN High Com- 
missioner for Refugees in Austria Arnold 
Rohrholt. A special provision made for on 
this market is that other use tracks and 
(Continued on page 4) 



ALBUMS 

Page One Albums will be 
found in the LP Review 
Section of this issue 



BIG HIT FOR 

MA ic a 



(Little Peggy March, That Is) 




1 Will Follow Him" 8139 
7w"Wind-Up Doll'' 

RCA VICTOR 



The most trusted name in sound w^fe) 



alerial 



MARCH 23, 1963 



BILLBOARD 3 



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EDITORIAL 

Pulling Together 

At THE NARM MEETNG in San Francisco last week, 
many, if not all of the rack jobbers present expressed their serious 
concern to manufacturers over the large number of distributors now 
in rack jobbing. They claimed that distribs, purchasing product 
from manufacturers at a lower wholesale price, thus could afford 
to sell merchandise on their racks at a lower price than could a 
racker who was not also a wholesale distributor. Some even sug- 
gested that they might be forced out of rack jobbing due to distrib- 
rack competition. 

Almost simultaneously, distributors, many of them members of 
ARMADA, were expressing their serious concern about Handleman 
Bros. — one of the country's largest rack merchandisers — entering 
the distribution business with the opening of Border City Sales in 
Detroit as distributor for MGM Records in that territory. The dislrib 
apprehension about Handleman in their business was that he could 
use his Detroit outlet to supply his racks in cities other than Detroit, 
thus cutting out the local MGM distribs in those cities. 

There is no reason why a distributor cannot become a rack 
jobber, if he has the time and energy to do so, nor any reason why 
a racker can't also open a separate distribution organization. Many 
distributors have already done so and Handleman may only be the 
first large racker to take on wholesale distribution functions. 

But both distribs and rackers would be better off if they tried 
to co-operate with each other rather work against each other. Under 
Amos Heilicher and Johnny Kaplan, the distributor organization, 
ARMADA, has assumed new strength and attempted seriously to 
work out industry problems. Many key manufacturers have joined 
the new distrib-led ARMADA, thereby validating the importance of 
of the wholesale distributor function. 

NARM, whose members represent about 50 per cent of the 
entire rack jobbing business, has also been concerned with attempting 
to tackle rack problems, and its annual meetings have become top 
priority occasions for almost all leading manufacturers to attend. 

Isn't it about time for distributors and racks to attempt them- 
selves to work out some sort of co-operative approach to their 
problems instead of running to manufacturers with their complaints 
against each other? And isn't it about time for NARM and 
ARMADA, as the trade organizations of these groups, to talk to 
each other about these problems? Together, they could well resolve 
some of the industry's thorniest questions. Failure to do so could 
be an open invitation for the government to step in, with all the 
inherent dangers of interference that this represents. 

Cecil Steen, a vet record man who has also been a distributor, 
is_npw president of NARM. Amos Heilicher, the head of ARMADA, 
is not only a distributor, but also heads a rack jobbing firm, and is a 
member of NARM as well. Each of these men knows the other's 
problems: surely they can talk to each other about their common 
problems more easily than through a third party. 

The record industry needs both the distributor and the racker, 
and the industry is large enough for both to function. But it will be 
easier for both to function if they face their problems together. 
They both need each other, too. 



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Friends Fete Ben Selvin 
As He Leaves Industry 



NEW YORK— The music in- 
dustry saluted Ben Selvin last 



DEPARTMENTS 
& FEATURES 



General 

Ta lcr>> , LQ 

Country Music 14 

Rhythm & Biues It 

Clas; : cn Music Ifi 

Mutic Pop Charts 

Hot i no 24 

Page I Singles I 

Top LP's 34 

Page I Albums 32 

Honor Roll of Hits IK 

Hot Country Singles 14 

Hot R.&B. Singles 16 

Record Reviews 

LP Reviews U 

Singles Reviews 20 

International 

Hits of th> World 2A 

Int'l News Reports 28 

'-t 1 ! E.thanqe 37 

Radio-TV Programming 

Prcqrammirq Newsletter 4? 
Resdy-t-'-C-c Fr.-qr., r^.rv ma *4 

Phono-Tape Merchandising 

Equipment Newsletter 47 

Bes- Sc inq Phonos 4<i 

Coin Machine Operating 

Music Mochine Programming .,54 

Double-Play Disks 54 

Bull. Vending 56 

Buyers & Sellers 
Cla«ified Mart 48 



week (14) on the occasion of 
his retirement at a dinner at the 
St. Moritz. Selvin, who for half 
a century has been leaving his 
mark on the business as a violin- 
ist, band leader, radio director, 
publishing executive and record- 
ing manager, retired last week 
from RCA Victor at the age of 
65, after 10 years as a.&r. man- 
ager for RCA Victor's Custom 
Record Department. 

The dinner was attended by 
more than 200 people, from all 
levels of Victor, the AFM, ma- 
jor record firms and hundreds 
of friends in publishing and 
recording. 

Selvin's career with Victor 
started in 1919 when he was 21. 
He recorded four songs, for $10 
per song, for the old Victor 
Talking Machine Company. One 
of the recordings was "Darde- 
nella," which became the first 
dance record to sell over one 
million copies. For this, Selvin 
was presented with a gold rec- 
ord by RCA Victor at the 
dinner. 

Selvin's ork also had hits with 
"I'm Forever Blowing Bubbles," 
and "A Pretty Girl Is Like a 
Melody." During his career, Sel- 
vin recorded more than 9,000 
selections under nine different 
names for nine different com- 
panies. 

In 1927 Selvin joined the Co- 
lumbia Phonograph Company, 
and became director of a.&r. 
He assisted in the formation of 
CBS. He served as vice-presi- 
dent of the Muzak Corporation 
(Continued on paee 6) 



Handleman Move Still Rocking 
Distribs; ARMADA Calls Meet 



NEW YORK — The pot con- 
tinued bubbling on various 
fronts last week in connection 
with the recent entry into the 
record distributing business of 
the Handleman rack-jobbing 
firm, generally regarded as one 
of the giants in the rack field. 

The week's developments in- 
cluded statements from a com- 
peting rack jobber, an affected 
distributor, and the president of 
the record firm which became 
the firm to be distributed by 
the new Handleman firm, 
known as Border City Sales in 
Detroit. 

In addition, steps were taken 
to effect a meeting in the imme- 
diate future of the board of di- 
rectors of the American Record 
Merchants and Distributors As- 
sociation (ARMADA). Letters 
went out to all board members 
late Thursday from the office 
of ARMADA Executive 
.Secretary Paul Ackerman, seek- 
ing the members' choice of dates 

WB Sales 
Sizzling 

HOLLYWOOD — Warner 
Bros. Records topped the $2,- 
500,000 sales gross mark during 
the first two months of this 
year. The gross is figured at 
manufacturer's price. Accord- 
ing to label President Mike 
Maitland, an impressive share of 
the sales volume was attributed 
to the repeat LP's by both Allan 
Sherman (My Son, the Ce- 
lebrity") and Peter, Paul and 
Mary ("Moving"). 

Also a notable share of sales, 
Maitland said, stemmed from 
such catalog items as the label's 
LP's featuring the E v e r 1 y 
Brothers. Bob Newhart. Joanne 
Sommers, and the "Music Man" 
and "Gyspy" sound-track pack- 
ages. 

The label will more than 
double its sales this year over 
the past year, Maitland said. 
In addition to its LP activity. 
WB has been riding high in 
singles, moving more than 700,- 
000 copies of Valiant's "Rhythm 
of the Rain" by the Cascades, 
and Jerry Wallace's "Shutters 
and Boards" on Challenge. 
Other strong singles included re- 
leases by Peter, Paul and Mary; 
Dick and Deedee. and the 
Johnny Beecher "Sax Fifth 
Avenue." 



Len Levy Named 
Epic Gen. Mgr. 

NEW YORK — Leonard S. 
Levy has been named general 
manager of Epic Records, ac- 
cording to Norman Adler, exe- 
cutive vice-president of Colum- 
bia Records, parent organization 
of Epic. Levy, who had held 
the post of national sales man- 
ager, will now report directly to 
Bill Gallagher, Columbia vice- 
president of marketing- 
Levy joined Epic in October, 
1961, in the post of national 
sales manager. Previously he 
had held sales exec posts with 
Top Rank Records and with 
Coral and Brunswick Records. 
Just prior to joining Epic, he 
had been vice-president of Mod- 
ern Sound, Inc., an indie pro- 
ducing firm. 

Commenting on the appoint- 
ment, Gallagher said, "Levy's 
new appointment and the estab- 
(Continued on page 6) 



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BRENDA STUFF 
ALL BY DECCA 

NEW YORK — Inadvertently 
a story filed from Nashville that 
ran in the March 2 issue stated 
that Brenda Lee would be re- 
cording in Hamburg, Germany, 
for the Polydor label. While 
it's true that Miss Lee will re- 
cord in the Polydor studios in 
Hamburg, all her recordings arc 
issued exclusively by Decca 
Records of the U. S. and these 
German dates were set under 
the auspices of Decca. 

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and location for a meeting. 
Dates would be either Friday 
(22) or sometime during the 
week of Monday (25), with Chi- 
cago seen as the most likely set- 
ting for the huddle. Various 
topics will be covered, including 
the entry of rack jobbers into 
the distributing picture and the 
ramifications therefrom, accord- 
ing to Ackerman. 

Reached for comment on the 
developing situation, MGM Rec- 
ords President Arnold Maxin 
said (of Handleman): "I regard 
him as a distributor pure and 
simple and he'll be judged by 
us as a distributor." 

No Beefs Yet 

Maxin said that he has yet 
to receive a word of complaint 
from any MGM distributor in 
connection with the assignment 
of MGM to Border City Sales 
in Detroit. Referring to possible 
future complaints or questions 
on the matter, Maxin said, 
"We'll cross that bridge when 



we come to it." Beyond that, 
Maxin noted, "I think you will 
find that most distributors also 
have rack connections of their 
own." 

Meanwhile, Jack Solinger of 
Music Distributor, Chicago, who 
last week withheld comment 
pending clarifications, was 
openly critical this week. Sol- 
inger, whose firm handles MGM 
in the Chicago area, said: "I've 
already lost sales of my major 
(Continued on page 6) 



UA Tabs 
Pub Execs 



NEW YORK— Responsibility 
for the activities of the pub- 
lishing firms associated with 
United Artists Music has been 
reapportioned through appoint- 
ments of three key executives to 
the firms, according to Mike 
Stewart, executive vice-presi- 
dent. 

Jack Gold has been named 
executive producer in charge of 
creative projects, Murray 
Deutch, general professional 
manager and Kenneth Lauber, 
executive assistant to Stewart. 

Besides the new appointees 
Eve Sasko continues as head of 
the copyright department, Sid- 
ney Shcmcl will serve as legal 
counsel and Simon Mael is con- 
troller. 

The United Artists music firm 
has two Academy Award con- 
tenders in the score category 
with "Taras Bulba" and in the 
best song nominated in "Two for 
the Seesaw." 



Billboard 



We Play a Part on TV 

The fine hand of Billboard had something to do with, of all 
things, an episode in the Andy Griffith CBS television show 
coming up March 18. 

Seems that Richard O. Linke, who is associate producer of 
that hot TV show as well as being personal manager of the 
personable Griffith, is a steady and perceptive reader of our 
paper. Andy had asked Dick to recommend a good Blue Grass 
singing group for the episode called "The Darlings Are 
Coming." 

Though Dick is a member in good standing of the Country 
Music Association, he wasn't personally acquainted with the Blue 
Grass crowd. So while browsing through Billboard one night, he 
saw an item about a group known as the Dillars who had just 
been signed to Elektra Records. Linke called Lee Zhito of our 
Hollywood office and Zeke filled him in. 

Linke called up Jac Holzman, boss man at Elektra, who 
arranged for Dick to hear the group. Then Aaron Ruben, pro- 
ducer of the Andy Griffith show, was invited to listen and the 
group was set for the date. 

Then Sheldon Leonard, the show's executive producer, re- 
membered that Dick Linke also had a girl singer named 
Margaret Ann Peterson. Both Dick and Andy Griffith have 
worked with her since 1955 when she was a high school girl in 
Greeley, Colo., working with a small combo on the side. 

At Leonard's request, Linke flew Margaret Ann in from 
Las Vegas, where she had been working the Sands Hotel, and 
she got a quick audition and a job on the show, which also will 
feature actor Denver Pyle in his first comedy role. 

So when you catch the show — March 18 on CBS at 9:30 
Eastern Standard Time — give Billboard a thought. After all, 
we had something to say about getting that episode ready. 



PUBLISHER 



Co 



4 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 



UN Disk Zooms All Over World Dot Tried to Get in 

Record Clubs, Wood 
Tells FCC Hearing 



• Continued from page I 

songs from this album will be withheld from gen- 
eral release in the country for two years. In the 
24-hour period following the dedication, 5,000 
albums were sold. This is the biggest LP sale in 
the country in such a time period. Over the past 
three days another 5,000 LP's were sold until, 
at this writing, 15,200 total sales have been 
registered. 

BELGIUM 
By JAN TORFS 

The "All Star Festival" LP is being touted as 
the greatest selling record ever to hit the Belgium 
market. On February 26, the day of its release 
here, more than 30,000 copies of the record were 
sold. This is the greatest single sale for one day 
in the history of the disk business here. Very 
small dealers in our country were able to sell 
more than 25 albums in one day, more than 
many sell in a month. Publicity and promotion 
from all media is enormous. It is estimated that 
more than 100,000 copies of the set have been 
pushed across counters since the set went on sale. 

DENMARK 
By ARNE HANSEN 

Ice conditions in Danish waters have forced 
the postponement of the release of the United 
Nations "All Star Festival" LP back from its 
March 15 release date. The album is selling at 
27.50 Danish kroner (normal LP price is 38 
D.kr.). As a special incentive the refugee commit- 
tee and SAS, the Scandinavian Airways, have set 
up prizes to buyers, a round-trip flight and a 
week's vacation in New York for two. 

HOLLAND 
By SKIP VOOCD 

"All Star Festival" LP is a huge success in the 
Netherlands. During the first two days 15,000 
LP's were sold, a record number for sale in the 
low countries. The price here is very low, 7.50 
guilders (2). Idea for the LP goes to Geert 
Elfferich, who held the 23-hour non-stop TV 
marathon benefit for the LP and refugees. Meele 
Weersma was charged with the production of the 
LP. 

Two refugee children from Holland, Irena Da- 



nuta Skrzetuszewski, who is 10 years old, and 
Laszio Rando, 12, offered the first sample to 
Queen Juliana at Soestdijk Palace. 

PHILIPPINES 
By LUIS M. A. TRINIDAD 

The "All Star Festival" LP drive for the benefit 
of United Nations Refugees was kicked off by 
official proclamation of President Diosdado Maca- 
pagal delivered by Executive Secretary Salvador 
Marino. Diomedes Malum and the Newsmens 
Chorale performed a few musical selections in 
honor of the occasion. 

NORWAY 
By ESPEN ERKSEN 

Just a little over two weeks after its issue, "All 
Star Festival" has received the 25,000 silver disk 
award from the Norwegian phonograph industry. 
According to the latest statistics, Norway ranks 
third among European countries selling the rec- 
ord. In Norway the LP moved into the Top 10 
this week, hitting the No. 10 position. This is the 
first time any LP has moved into the chart listing 
usually reserved for singles and EP's. The posi- 
tion achieved by the album might be even higher 
if so many records were not sold on a direct mail 
basis. The Verdens Gang newspaper, which com- 
piles the Billboard list, only checks retail dealer 
outlets and has no way of accounting for these 
direct sales. 

SWEDEN 
By HENRY FOX 

Despite the fact that "All Star Festival" sells 
for a higher price in this country than in any 
other on the Continent, the album has also sold 
more copies here to date than in any other 
European nation. The album was promoted dur- 
ing a special TV show where phone orders were 
taken. In four hours more than 92,000 LP's were 
sold, a record that will probably never be dupli- 
cated in this country. Part of the promotion was 
tied to Scandinavian Airways, which was offering 
a free air trip to New York to one of the lucky 
LP buyers. It is believed that total sales of the 
album have broken the 100,000 mark at this 
writing. 



DeCCQ $$: Columbia Names Shifts in 



A Million 

NEW YORK— Decca Records 
had the highest consolidated 
net income in the company's his- 
tory in 1962, according to an 
annual report issued by Presi- 
ent Milton Rackmil Friday 
(15). The record company, along 
with its Universal Pictures sub- 
sidiary, hit an all-time net high 
of $5,615,281 in 1962, equal to 
$3.68 per share. Net income for 
the same period in 1961 was 
$3,964,642, equal to $3.08 per 
share. 

A comparison of the separate 
statements issued by Decca and 
by Universal showed that the 
Decca Records parent firm 
topped the $1,000,000 net in- 
come mark last year. Of the 
$5,615,281 net total in 1962, 
Universal was responsible for 
$4,422,614 net while Decca ac- 
counted for a net total of $1,- 
192,667. This puts them $219,- 
501 ahead of the net figure of 
$873,166 for 1961. 

uiiiiiiinRiiiiiiiiiiHiiiHgiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiioiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

VICTOR BRINGS 
OUT RED SEAL 
NEWSLETTER 

NEW YORK — RCA Victor 
has instituted a monthly "Inside 
Red Seal" Newsletter, designed 
to furnish dealers with informa- 
tion on the activities of Red 
Seal artists and their recordings. 
Each will feature an "Artist of 
the month" and give info about 
tours, current advertising mate- 
rials and discography informa- 
tion. First issue in February fea- 
tured Jascha Heifitz, and March 
featured Artur Rubinstein. Last 
month Victor also started the 
"Red Seal Dealer News" to give 
information on planning and 
merchandising. 



David Wynshaw 
N. Y. Branch Head 

NEW YORK — David Wyn- 
shaw has been appointed Co- 
lumbia Record Distributors 
branch manager for New York 
and Newark, according to Sales 
Director Donald England. Wyn- 
shaw succeeds veteran distribu- 
ting exec Paul Southard, whose 
retirement became official last 
month. Wynshaw was formerly 
Los Angeles branch head. 

Other new sales appointments 
in the Columbia organization in- 
clude that of William Farr to 
the post of merchandising direc- 
tor, Columbia Records Sales 
Corporation, according to Ken 
Glancy, CRSC vice-president. 
Farr will supervise the activities 
on pop product of Joe Norton 
and Bruce Lundvall; master- 
works, Pete Munves and Tom 
Bcrman; singles, Dave Rosner, 
and field communications, Sal 
Forlenza. Farr will report to 
Glancy. 

Promoted to staff assistant, 
Tony Rubino will assist Glancy 
in administration and will work 
with Jim Sparling in planning 
products. 



Jack A-Sing 
On the Wing 

HOLLYWOOD— Reprise Rec- 
ords may be writing disk history 
this year with its "Sing Along 
With JFK" LP by launching a 
top seller without the benefit of 
radio exposure. Most of the 
leading stations in this area 
have backed away from the al- 
bum, bringing its air play to nil. 
Despite this handicap, the pack- 
age has taken off into full sales 
stride. 

After only one week in the 
market, retailers here indicate 
the package is a strong seller 



Mercury 

NEW YORK— Mercury Rec- 
ords, in three days of meetings 
here, made sweeping realign- 
ments of its entire a.&r. staff to 
handle its three labels, Mercury, 
Philips and Smash. According to 
Irving Green, Mercury chief, the 
changes were necessary due to 
the extensive growth of all three 
labels. 

Mercury brass, including 
Green, Irwin Steinberg, Kenny 
Myers, Shelby Singleton and 
Charlie Fach, set up separate 
a.&r. staffs to handle recording 
for each label. From now on, 
Mercury recording will be han- 
dled by Singleton, Quincy Jones, 
David Carroll and MWB Pro- 
ductions in Philadelphia. 

Jack Kennedy in Nashville, 
Hal Mooney and Herb Rosen in 
New York, will handle re- 
cordings for Philips. Doug 
Moody, Eastern regional man- 
ager for Smash, will now serve 
as Fach's Eastern recording di- 
rector. Jack Tracy, Mercury's 
man on the Coast, will continue 
to handle a.&r. for all three 
labels. 

and is continuing to climb rap- 
idly. The Music City best seller 
chart has listed it in the No. 40 
spot, reflecting sales of less than 
a week. 

Jim Hawthorne, program di- 
rector of KFWB here and the 
other Crowell - Collier stations 
(San Francisco and Minneapolis) 
told Billboard his station played 
a track out of the Reprise — JFK 
package as a test the day he 
received it. After the majority 
of unsolicited listener calls op- 
posed its playing, he pulled the 
LP from the air. Other stations 
here (including KABC. KFS, 
KHJ. KNX, KRLA) have de- 
cided against airing it, though 
none of the stations claim that 
it has been officially banned. 



By REN GREVATT 

NEW YORK — Dot Records has held discussions and in some 
cases actual negotiations with all three of the major record clubs 
regarding the release of its product through the clubs, but none 
of the projected deals ever worked out, according to Dot President 
Randy Wood. 

Competitive pressure posed by 
the entrance of other prominent 
indie labels into club distribu- 
tion and inquiries from artists 
about the possibility of such dis- 
tribution for their records has 
forced Dot to be club conscious, 
Wood said in testimony during 
the final week of hearings on 
the Federal Trade Commission's 
complaint against CBS and the 
Columbia Record Club. 

Other highlights of the con- 
cluding sessions of presentation 
by Government counsel of the 
so-called case - in - chief were 
testimony by Paul Ackerman, 
former Billboard music editor 
and currently executive secre- 
tary of ARMADA; Dave Roth- 
feld, record buyer for Korvette's; 
Al Hirsch, president of Mal- 
verne Distributors, and Edwin 
Ricotta, a principal of Wonder- 
man, Ricotta and Klein, ad 
agency for the Columbia club. 
In addition, Hearing Examiner 
Donald Moore heard oral argu- 
ment on the admissability as 
evidence of a listing of gross 
annual dollar volume of 56 rec- 
ord companies, allegedly repre- 
senting 90 per cent of all album 
sales in thS country. 

Funny Position 

Arrangement for the prepara- 
tion of this information was 
made by the Government with 
its use intended to show Colum- 
bia in a dominant share-of- 
markct position in the United 
States. Columbia counsel were 
placed in the unique position 
of challenging the document be- 
cause, in their view, the figures 
tended to give the company 
credit for a considerably larger 
share of the market than it 
actually enjoys. 

Earlier, it had been expected 
that Moore would render a de- 
cision on the admissibility of this 
evidence during the final hear- 
ing session, Wednesday (13), but 
Moore reserved decision. 

Meanwhile. Moore scheduled 
a hearing of oral arguments on 
a motion by Columbia to dis- 
miss the charges, for Wednesday 
afternoon (20) in Washington. 
Monday, April 15, was tenta- 
tively set for the commencement 
of the defense case, assuming 
the examiner either denies the 
motion to dismiss or reserves 
decision. 

In direct examination by 
Counsel Richard Lavine, Wood 
disclosed that his firm now has 
800 to 1,000 albums in its cata- 
log, and that the firm has "16 
or 17 wholly owned distribu- 
torships." A question on why the 
negotiations for affiliation with 
the Victor club were never con- 
sumated, was objected to by 
Columbia counsel. As a guide to 
higher review of the case, in 
case of an appeal. Wood was 
allowed to answer, with the 
answer taken as an "offer of 
proof," but not an official part 
of the record. 

"The Victor attorneys didn't 
think it was legal to have an 
exclusive contract with an out- 
side label," Wood asserted. 
'Forced Into It' 

Explaining that he honestly 
felt that clubs have hurt the 
dealer. Wood, however, said, 
"I've been interested in getting 
club distribution for several 
years in order to be competitive. 
I'm almost forced into it. It 



doesn't mean I want to, I just 
have to. Our thinking has 
shifted, however. We are now 
running mail-order tests with the 
view of starting our own Dot 
record club with no outside 
labels." 

In cross-examination Colum- 
bia counsel Asa Sokolow asked 
if Dot had ever lost artists to 
Columbia, Capitol or Victor. 

"No," Wood replied. 

In further questioning by 
Sokolow, it was brought out 
(Continued on page 6) 



Billboard 

Published Weekly by 
The Billboard Publishing Company 
2160 Patterson St., Cincinnati 14, Ohio 
Tel.: 381-6450 

Publisher 

Hal B. Cook , . New York Office 
Editorial Office 

1564 Broadway. New York 36, N. Y. 
PLaza 7-2800 

Editor-in-Chief Sam Chase 

Editors Robert Rolontr, 

Aaron Stemfield 
Associate Editor ... Ren Crevatt 

Department Editors, New York 

Music News Robert Rolonti 

Phono-Tapt & Special Issues. ..Ren Gnvatt 

Radio-TV Programming Oil Fsggen 

International News Jack Maher 

Talent & Copy Editor Jack Orr 

Coin Machines Aaron $ternfield 

Editorial Assistant Barry Kittltion 

U. S. Editorial Offices 
Cincinnati, Exec. News Editor. Wm. J. Sachs 

Chicago, Midwest Editor Nicholas Biro 

Hollywood, W. Coast Manager Lee Zhito 

Washington ..Larston Farrar & Mildred Hall 
Nashville Mark-Clark Bates 

Research Department, New York 

Director Thomas E. Noonan 

Pop Charts Mgr Andrew Tomko 

Production Department, New York 

Art Director l« Lebowltz 

General Advertising Office, N. Y. 

Director of Sales Andrew Cslda 

Advertising Manager Peter Heine 

Promotion Mgr, & Intl. Sales.. Frank Luppino 

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Coin Machine Adv., Chicago 

Coin Machine Ad. Mgr Richard Wilson 

Circulation Sales, New York 
Circulation Manager. .Walter F. Grueninger 

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# Published week- 
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riKM 19(13 by The > ^""5' 
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Vol. 75 No. 12 



Mathis 
Never 



Misses! 




CL 2016/CS 8816 Stereo 



COLUMBIA RECORDS 



atenal 



6 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23. 1963 



Dot Tried to Get Into Disk Clubs 



Continued from page 4 



that Dot's gross increased from 
about $6,000,000 in 1957 to 
$16,000,000 in 1961. It was also 
shown that net profits also in- 
creased at the same time. 

In an unstated allusion to 
Columbia's outside label licens- 
ing arrangements, Sokolow ob- 
tained Wood's agreement that 
company-owned branches give 
better product control and dis- 
tribution and that a distributor 
or branch has an exclusive right 
for a given line in a given area. 
Wood also admitted that Dot 
disks are sold through rack job- 
bers and discounters, though he 
said he felt that both hurt 
dealers. 

"Neither racks nor discounters 
are good for our industry," he 
said. 

Testimony by Ackerman in- 
troduced little new evidence of 
a startling nature, but it did pro- 
duce touches of color. Asked to 
define the meaning of a catalog 
item, he noted, "A primitive 
blue by Jimmy Reed on Vee Jay 
would be a catalog seller as 
against a six or seven-week pop 
hit." 

Ackerman noted he felt that 
clubs, originally advanced as an 
entity to tap new markets and 
gravitate new customers to 
stores, had not upheld this 
promise to dealers. He said he 
felt that original mail-order 
price offers of clubs, employing 
a comparison of what the cus- 
tomer would pay for the record 
in his store, ran counter to the 
theory of helping dealers. He 
also challenged the concept of 
maintaining what he called "a 
fictitious list price" by the clubs 
in order to heighten the effect 
of the low price club offers. 
Editorials Cited 

During cross-examination, Co- 
■ lumbia counsel submitted as evi- 
dence three editorials from Bill- 

Nevins-Kirshner 

• Continued from pane I 

whether the Nevins-Kirschner 
operation is handled as a sep- 
arate division, or as part of an 
over-all consolidation, of an es- 
tablished label, no jobs are ex- 
pected to be eliminated. 

There have been reports that 
if and when the Nevins-Kirsh- 
ner sale is effected, that Nevins 
will not go along with the new 
set-up but that Kirshner will run 
the new set-up himself, as on a 
contract basis. No confirmation 
could be obtained on this. 

Aldon Music has been one of 
the hottest publishing firms in 
the business for the past few 
years. It has produced many im- 
portant writers in today's mar- 
ket, including Jerry Goffin and 
Carole King, Barry Mann and 
Cynthia Weil, Howard Green- 
field, Neil Scdaka and many 
more. 

Firm has produced many top 
hits for labels, as well as 
smashes for its own Dimension 
label like Little Eva's "Loco- 
Motion"; "Chains," by the 
Cookies, and Carole King's "It 
Might as Well Rain Until Sep- 
tember." 

Len Levy Named 

• Continued from paste 3 

lishmcnt of Epic as a separate 
profit center reflects the la- 
bel's extraordinary growth in 
the past year. Under his direc- 
tion, Epic experienced its great- 
est sales volume in history dur- 
ing 1962. With major increase 
in the popular and classical art- 
ist roster and the growing im- 
portance of Epic product in the 
international market, the label 
should enjoy even greater sales 
in 1963." 



board which tended to support 
the club concept. Ackerman ex- 
plained that it was true the 
editorials reflected the stand of 
the paper's management at the 
time they were written (in 1955, 
1957 and 1958) but that later, 
he personally came to a differ- 
ent view for reasons outlined in 
earlier testimony. 

Another editorial, entitled 
"Plain Bedside Talk," published 
in 1959, which took issue with 
certain aspects of the club con- 
cept, also arose in the discussion 
and was introduced as an exhibit 
for the Government. At another 
point in redirect questioning. 
Ackerman was asked to state the 
role of Columbia in the growth 
of discounters. 

"It isn't fair to single Colum- 
bia out," he said. "Columbia 
and all the rest supported Goody 
right up to his bankruptcy 
period because he helped es- 
tablish the LP and because he 
sells a lot of records." 

Edwin Ricotta appeared pri- 
marily as the bearer of a tre- 
mendous array of Columbia 
club ads, prepared by his 
agency. These were to be sub- 
mitted as Government exhibits. 

Rothfeld retraced much of 
the ground covered during his 
earlier testimony at the start of 
the hearings last January. He re- 
ported his belief that clubs tend 
to focus on classical war horses, 
thus removing some of the traf- 
fic from catalog stores such as 
Korvette's. He noted an occa- 
sion where a Korvette sale ad 
appeared in the same issue of 
The New York Times as that 
which carried a club ad. 

"This kind of thing made our 
ads look picayune at times," he 
said, adding, "In one instance I 
overheard customers who said 
our (Korvette's) ad was 'No 
great shakes.' " 

In cross-examination, Roth- 
feld admitted that Korvette be- 
gan discounting in 1948, some- 
what before the start of the 
Columbia club. He also admit- 
ted that discounting by Korvette, 
in his opinion, has been "good 
for the business and has stimu- 
lated interest in records." 



Hal Cook to Speak 
At British Meet 



LONDON — Hal B. Cook, 
publisher of Billboard, will be 
guest speaker April 22 at the 
meeting of the conference of the 
Gramophone Record Retailers' 
Association. It will be a high- 
light of Cook's projected visit, 
his first to Britain since assum- 
ing his Billboard post last June. 

An annual dinner will follow 
the GRRA annual meeting, a 
conference and trade exhibition. 
Latter, a trade fair embraces 
both large and small record 
manufacturers, plus suppliers of 
needles, record racks and other 
accessories. This year, for the 
first time, members of the public 
will be able to attend the ex- 
hibition during certain hours. 
The GRRA executives decided 
on this unusual step because 
during conference meetings the 
exhibitors are neglected. 

The conference itself again 
takes the form of specific sub- 
jects, analyzed and discussed by 
specialist speakers with ques- 
tions from the floor. These arc 
closed sessions open only to 
dealers and their staffs. At the 
dinner, the National Record 
Awards — organized by the 
GRRA and "Record Retailer" — 
will be presented. For the first 
time, the convention will be 
located in the New Ambassadors 
Hotel. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

MASTER TIPS 
CAN WIN LOOT 

NASHVILLE — Monument 
Records has kicked off what it 
calls, "Monument's Mighty Mas- 
ter Contest," under which tip- 
sters on available masters which 
are acquired and become hits 
can receive up to $1,000. 

Under the rules, any person 
who sends in a tip and a copy 
of the record or full informa- 
tion on it of a master to be 
leased or purchased by the la- 
bel, will receive $1,000 if the 
disk hits top 10 in any of the 
trade paper charts. Under the 
same procedure, a disk hitting 
the top 20 in any three trade 
papers will bring $500 to the 
winner, while $100 is the re- 
ward on a disk hitting the top 
100 in at least two trade paper 
lists. 



Decco Again Adds 
To Solid Line With 
6 'Favorite' LP's 

NEW YORK— Depth in cata- 
log is a forte of Decca Records 
and the label is once again add- 
ing to its solid line of evergreen 
material with six new albums 
for the Golden Favorites series. 
The new sets continue on the 
tradition of the Golden Favor- 
ites scries either through great 
hit performances or significant 
new performances of past and 
present hit material. 

This line, which draws from 
the depth of the Decca catalog, 
was instituted several years ago 
and included such illustrious 
artists as Webb Pierce, Red 
Foley, Bing Crosby, the Ink 
Spots, Ella Fitzgerald, the Mc- 
Guire Sisters, Kitty Wells, 
Ernest Tubb. Louis Armstrong. 
Wayne King and Jackie Wilson 
and will continue to be added to 
in succeeding years. 

Among the artists in the new 
releases are such names as 
Lionel Hampton. 

Special incentives are being 
offered dealers in support of the 
new albums as well as all the 
rest in this specific catalog. Spe- 
cial mobile displays and a com- 
plete litho book displaying all 
34 covers arc also being shown 
by salesmen. 



LATE SINGLE SPOTLIGHTS 



Pop 



Wein on as UA 
Series Producer 

NEW YORK— George Wein, 
Newport jazz festival impresario, 
pianist, artist representative and 
record producer has signed as 
an exclusive producer for the 
United Artists jazz series. 
Through Wein, the label has 
signed Dakota Staton and trum- 
peter Howard McGhec to re- 
cording contracts. Wein will be 
in charge of these artists' re- 
cordings. 

According to Art Talmadge, 
president of UA Records, the 
signing of Wein is another move 
in line with a new label policy 
of signing musicians as pro- 
duers. Both Miss Staton and 
McGhee will be waxed when 
Wein returns from a European 
trip. He is currently accompany- 
ing Thelonious Monk on the 
Continent. 

"St. Thomas," an LP by 
Herbie Mann, and a Rose Mur- 
phy and Slam Stewart set are 
two of the most recent jazz 
disks released by the label pro- 
duced before Wein joined the 
firm. 



NED MILLER 

THE MAN BEHIND THE GUN (l aber-Rondo, BMI) (2:46)— ONE 
AMONG MANY (Central Songs, BMI) (3:01)— Two fine follow-ups 
for Miller, the "Jack to a King" man. First up is a smart, fast-stepping 
waltz in the Wcsternish saga style while the flip is an effective 
country ballad. Good arrangements back the chanter both ways. 

FABER 116 

BRIAN HYLAND 

SOMEWHERE IN THE NIGHT (Pogo, ASCAP (2:40) — I WISH 
TODAY WAS YESTERDAY (Pogo, ASCAP) (2:34) — Hyland 
scores with two effective and neatly contrasting efforts. Top side 
is strongly in the country ballad vein, in terms of lyric and perform- 
ance. Flip has a strong European quality with a musette accordion 
in the backing. This side should score well in overseas markets. 

ABC-PARAMOUNT 10427 



Hand lemon Move Rocks Distribs 

• Continued from page 3 

line to them (Handleman's 
firm)." 

"I would say this is the cross- 
roads. This marks the most im- 
portant move in our business in 
10 years because it can have 
great impact on the whole dis- 
tributor dealer structure. More 
than anything else now, self ap- 
praisal by distributors and racks 
is needed. This thing could be 
the catalyst that sets a new di- 
rection for the business. 

"It certainly represents a chal- 
lenge and an opportunity for 



Storday Begins 
30-Day Promo 

NASHVILLE— Starday Rec- 
ords announced last week a 30- 
"Spotlight on Bluegrass 5-String 
Banjo Albums." 

This plan follows the suc- 
cessful "Country Music for the 
People" program offered re- 
cently by the label. Under the 
upcoming plan, according to 
President Don Pierce, dealers 
can get two free bluegrass al- 
bums for each 10 ordered from 
Starday distributors during 
March. A total of 36 bluegrass 
albums are spotlighted and 
available under the plan. In- 
cluded are a bluegrass sampler 
retailing at $1.98, a double 
pocket 5-string Banjo Jamboree 
Spectacular album retailing at 
$5.98. and a Bluegrass Hall of 
Fame Album at $3.98. The 
Hall of Fame set contains 16 
recordings by top bluegrass 
stars, including Lester Flatt and 
Earl Scruggs, Don Reno and 
Red Smiley, the Stanley Broth- 
ers, Hylo Brown, Bill Clifton, 
and many others. Pierce said. 

Ben Selvin 

• Continued from page 3 

from 1934 to 1941. and left to 
work with James Petrillo and 
the AFM in preparing a survey 
of recorded music. He joined 
Majestic Records in 1947, and 
left to join Columbia Records as 
West Coast a.&r. chief in Hol- 
lywood. In 1953 he started his 
decade with RCA Victor. 

Ralph Williams of RCA 
Victor Custom emseed the din- 
ner. Selvin was presented with 
a silver set from the industry 
and a gold clock from RCA Vic- 
tor. In his speech to his friends, 
Selvin noted that he was not 
retiring for good, but that he 
would serve as a musical con- 
sultant at the New York World's 
Fair. He said that "old a.&r. 
men never die" and that his 
slogan was still "Have Stop- 
watch, Will Travel." Selvin's 
wife. Gloria, and children. Rene. 
Rick and Robert, were there to 
see it all. 



ARMADA. This is the time for 
them to prove something to 
everybody." 

Wants Same Price 
Frank Arace, head of Market 
Merchandisers in nearby New- 
ark, N. J., had this to say: "We 
are writing to MGM to tell them 
very simply that we are entitled 
to buy at the same price as 
they (Handlcman) do. I guess 
I'm a queer kind of duck in the 
sense that I'm one rack jobber 
who gets along with his dis- 
tributors. I don't have to buy 
allocations like distributors do 
nor do I have to undertake their 
functions, so I don't try to get 
their price. 

"But in the case of the Han- 
dteman operation, they're get- 
ting preferential treatment, yet 
they arc a competitor of mine 
on my level. They are getting 
an edge they're not entitled to. 
I say what's sauce for the goose 
is sauce for the gander." 

In Detroit. Johnny Kaplan, 
whose firm Jay Jay (as well as 
Henry Droz' Arc Distributing), 
was bid for by Handleman be- 
fore it opened its own stop, was 
not available for comment. He 
was reported on vacation in 
Mexico. 



Terry Snyder, 47, 
Dies in New York 

NEW YORK— The record in- 
dustry was saddened last week 
when artist Terry Snyder died 
Friday (15) at 6 a.m. The per- 
cussionist, whose records on 
Enoch Light's Command label 
first brought him to prominence, 
had just signed with and had 
his first album released for Co- 
lumbia. Services were held at 
1 p.m. at Nassau North Chap- 
pels, Inc., Great Neck. He is 
survived by his widow Beatrice 
and two daughters. He was 47 
years old. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 

RIO NUT LOW, 
VISITOR SAYS 

NEW YORK — The inexpen- 
sive costs and modern recording 
facilities in Rio de Janeiro are 
being described here in glowing 
details by H. E. Morris, head 
of the Odeon, the EMI subsid- 
iary in Brazil. Morris is here to 
tell the story to background mu- 
sic companies and others inter- 
ested in availing themselves of 
studios and musicians at costs 
running as low as one-third 
those in this country. 

Morris will remain in New 
York until March 20. He is stay- 
ing at the St. Moritz Hotel. 



THINK HITS 



the VENTURES 



the FLEETWOODS 



"Skip To NT Limbo" i • "You Should Have Been There" 



b/w 
El Cumbanchero 

#68 



b/w 

It Sure Is Lonesome Downtown 
#74 




8 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23. 1963 



Phony Ratings Costly to Stations, Harris Says 



By MILDRED HALL 

WASHINGTON — The story 
of how ratings have cost Ameri- 
can radio broadcasters millions 
of dollars in advertising money 
because of the "rule of the num- 
bers," was told on Capitol Hill 
last week. Chairman Oren Har- 
ris ( D., Ark. ) of the special 
House Investigations Subcom- 
mittee holding hearings on 
broadcast ratings, commented: 
"We're getting more and more 
from industry on what it is do- 
ing to them. I wonder how the 
industry got itself into this situa- 
tion, and I hope that in the 
future we will not have the 
kind of thing described during 
the last few days of these hear- 
ings." 

The situation was outlined by 
network and independent radio 
broadcasters during the second 
week of the Subcommittee's 
hearings, and the committee 
members were by turns wrath- 
ful, amazed and amused. 

In the case of Robert C. 
Conlan and Associates, a minor 
radio market rating service 
whose "surveys" go out to 
about 300 to 400 cities across 
the country. Chairman Harris 
said the facts were going to the 
radio broadcasters who sub- 
scribed. The firm's "verifiers, 
program editors, tabulators and 
calculators," referred to in testi- 
mony of its President-Manager 
Robert E. West, turned out to 
be one Mrs. Hallie A. Jones, of 
Kansas City, Mo., who also 
doubled as bookkeeper and su- 
pervisor of "field reports" for 
the survey ratings. 

Mrs. Jones "Checked" 'Em 

Mrs. Jones also "checked" 



Howard Scott Quits 
MGM A.&R. Post 

NEW YORK— Howard Scott 
this week resigned his a.&r. 
position at MGM Records. He 
said he will announce new plans 
shortly. 

Scott, who had been with 
MGM for the past two years, 
formerly was Masterworks a.&r. 
head at Columbia. 



field reports on alleged thou- 
sands of phone calls made by 
"field workers" in establishing 
an audience rating for the sta- 
tions served. Total expenditures 
for the firm were something 
over $5,600, while its gross was 
about $65,000 a year. Offers to 
make as many as 4,600 phone 
calls for a $179 fee were made 
in its brochure. Identical letters 
were sent to stations in the same 
market telling each they were 
No. I in the Conlan area sur- 
vey, and reports were "still open 
for local participation." 

The Nielsen and Pulse radio 
rating services were scored 
heavily by independent owners 
of single stations, by Mutual 
Network head Robert F. Hur- 
leigh. and Gordon McLendon, 
owner of a six-station chain. All 
asserted that without a Nielsen 
rating, no major advertising 
agency would take time on a sta- 
tion. There was more than a 
suspicion by broadcasters that 
considerable back - scratching 
went on between highly rated, 
high-power radio stations with 
their favored Nielsens, the big 
ad agencies and the national 
sponsors. 

Hurleigh of Mutual said Niel- 



sen rates a big, blanketing 50,- 
000-watt station higher in a 
local market than a local 5,000- 
watter, even though the latter 
pulls far more of the local lis- 
tening audience. He said this 
practices was "misleading." 
Chairman Harris said, "You call 
it 'misleading'; I'd use the word 
*false." " 

Hurleigh Proposal 
Hurleigh has proposed an 
"ABC" type of circulation rating 
broadcasters can "believe in," 
and he has urged them to pool 
the $105,000 a year spent with 
Nielsen on a good system, pos- 
sibly one devised by Radio Ad- 
vertising Bureau. He also said 
that Nielsen's NSI — the Nielsen 
National Station Report — and its 
NRI — the Nielsen Radio Index 
— come up with different results 
for the same markets. Repre- 
sentative Moss (D., Calif.), 
labeled the whole procedure a 
"fantasy." 

"None of Your Business* 1 
Nielsen was reported to an- 
swer complaints or queries on 
their methods of arriving at 
ratings with "double talk" to 
the multiple owners and net- 
works, and a blunt "none of 
your business" to individual 



Prestige Real 
Splits Philly 

BERGENFIELD, N. J. — Pres- 
tige Records has realigned its 
top level executive personnel 
and made some new appoint- 
ments. In addition the label has 
set up split distribution for its 
10 labels in Philadelphia. A & L 
Distributing now carries Prestige 
International, Bluesville, Near 
East, Irish and Lively Arts. Saul 
Lambert, Inc., is now carrying 
Prestige, New Jazz. Swingsville, 
Moodsville and Tru-Sound. 

The executive line-up as it was 
outlined by President Robert 
Weinstock. includes: Ron Eyre, 
vice-president in charge of sales; 
Ozzie Cadena, vice-president in 
charge of recording; the newly 
appointed George Badonsky, 
field sales manager; Paul Roth- 



igns Execs; 
Distribution 

child, director of Prestige Inter- 
national; Victoria Pike, ex- 
ecutive assistant to the president, 
and Marcia Weinstock, in 
charge of promotional activities 
and press relations. 

The company has also intro- 
duced a rotating deal program. 
This allows for one of the sub- 
sidiary labels at discount along 
with the already announced five 
prime artists from the Prestige 
catalog. Moodsville is the sub- 
sid currently on a 15 per cent 
discount along with disks by 
Gene Ammons, Stan Getz, Red 
Garland, Mose Allison and The- 
Ionious Monk also available at 
15 per cent. 



Foley's New Firms 

NEW YORK — Reliance Music 
and Stride Music are the new 
publishing firms being started 
here this week by Norman 
Foley. Until last month Foley 
had been general professional 
manager of the Big Three, 
which he had joined in 1947. 
Before that Foley was the gen- 
eral manager of M. Witmark. 



Boy for Scotty 

HOLLYWOOD — Francis 
(Scotty) Scott III, Capitol Rec- 
ords' business affairs administra- 
tor, last week became a father 
for the second time when his 
wife, TV screen writer Marge 
Pitts, gave birth to a seven 
pound, nine ounce boy. The 
Scott's have a four-year-old 
daughter. 



Barry Joins Firm 

NEW YORK— Paul Barry is 
joining Peer and Southern Mu- 
sic as co-professional manager. 
He will be working with Lucky 
Carle, the professional manager 
of the organization. Barry has 
previously operated his own 
firm, Weiss & Barry, which was 
sold to Gene Autry two years 
ago, and had been with Wit- 
mark and E. H. Morris. 



broadcasters like Murry Wo- 
roner, of WAME, Dade County, 
Florida. 

Woroner took Pulse, Inc., 
over the hurdles for its alleged 
door-to-door canvas of radio 
listening in tne swank Dade 
County-Miami area. Door-to- 
door solicitation is not permitted 
there, and Miami police said no 
canvassers had been seen or re- 
ported in the neighborhood. 
Woroner asked Pulse how it 
could rate stations when 25 per 
cent of the market area could 
not be canvassed. Pulse spokes- 
men insisted that cops or no 
cops, they rang those door- 
bells. 

Woroner confessed frankly 
that he and other broadcasters 
took Nielsen and other survey 
services because they were 
"afraid not to" — even when they 
knew the ratings to be unfair: 
"The economic life or death of 
the individual broadcaster is 
tightly controlled by ratings." 

Programming is also con- 
trolled by ratings far more than 
any threat of control by the 
Federal Communications Com- 
mission, it was testified. Florida 
station manager Woroner said 
that when he changed format 
from a wild, swinging opera- 
tion, his rat i ng from N ielsen 
dropped from 2 down to 8th 
or 9th in the market. 

The Subcommittee members 
were appalled by the trick of 

Don Pierce Signs 
Skinner and Payne 

CINCINNATI— Don Pierce, 
president of Starday Records, 
Madison, Tenn., has signed Jim- 
mie Skinner, formerly heard on 
Mercury, and Leon Payne, blind 
country music singer, to Star- 
day recording pacts. 

Skinner, who heads up the 
Jimmic Skinner Music Center in 
downtown Cincinnati, one of the 
leading c.&w. record mail-order 
houses in the country, is sched- 
uled to record an album and 
single at the Starday studios 
in Madison this week. Payne re- 
cently cut two albums for Star- 
day, both slated for early re- 
lease. His Starday single, "Joe 
Lopez," is already reported off 
to a good start in the country 
field. 

Atlantic Names Fine 
Nat'l Promo Director 

NEW YORK — Jack Fine has 
been named national promo- 
tion director at Atlantic and 
Atco Records. Fine had been in 
charge of promotion at Amy- 
Mala for the past three years 
and had handled promotion on 
the first Dimension disk hits 
"Loco-Motion" and "Keep Your 
Hands Off My Baby," which 
were distributed by the Amy- 
Mala banner. Prior to his Amy- 
Mala post. Fine was Eastern 
rep for the Disney labels and 
was general professional man- 
ager at Irving Caesar Music. 



Epic Names Mohan 

NEW YORK— Epic Records 
has named John Mahan to the 
post of manager. East Coast re- 
gion promotion. According to 
Lcn Levy, Epic national sales 
manager, Mahan will be re- 
sponsible to national promotion 
manager, Sol Rabinowitz, for 
all promotion activity on the 
Epic and Okeh labels. Prior to 
joining Epic, Mahan was active 
as an announcer and program 
director in the Philadelphia 
radio scene. 



notifying stations that a survey 
is about to be made, so the 
station can hype its audience 
reach with giveaways and con- 
tests. High ratings produced on 
the basis of the hype enable it 
to snare more advertisers who 
think this audience reach is con- 
stant. Representative Rogers of 
Florida called this a "fraud on 
the public." 

Avalon Mgr. 
Marcucci in 
Picture Bow 

PHILADELPHIA— Bob Mar- 
cucci, head of Chancellor Rec- 
ords and manager of Frankie 
Avalon, Rod Lauren, and other 
recording-acting talent, makes 
his bow as a motion picture pro- 
ducer with an exploitation pack- 
age, "You're Only Young Once," 
with Avalon and Lauren as two 
of the young stars in the cast. 
Treatment has been completed 
by writers Rocky Kalish and El- 
roy Schwartz, and negotiations 
with studios now are being con- 
cluded by Marty Baum, of Gen- 
eral Artists Corporation, and 
Marcucci. 

The picture will have seven 
or eight songs, skipping the 
rock and roll for general appeal. 
Unique promotion will be 
pegged on the "YOYO" which 
represents the first letter of each 
word in the film's title. 

Avalon and Lauren each will 
have four feature films going 
into release between now and 
late summer, so Marcucci aims 
to have his production ready for 
fall distribution when these two 
stars will be receiving wide- 
spread promotional penetration. 
Exploitation also will be carried 
on through personal bookings of 
the artists, with Avalon and Rod 
Lauren both set to appear at 
the Steel Pier in Atlantic City 
in July and August respectively 
and other dates being set. 

"You're Only Young Once" is 
planned to be made in color 
and wide-screen and will be 
produced under the independ- 
ent banner of Astra Productions, 
owned by Marcucci and Ava- 
lon. MGM recently placed Ava- 
lon under long-term contract, 
following his appearance there 
in Zimbalist-Krasne's "Drums of 
Africa," and he has also future 
commitments with American In- 
ternational Pictures. 

lllllll!IIUII!IIUIIIIIigill!llllllllllllllllllllllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIHIIII!llllllllllll 

McCLUSKEY IN 
BUSINESS AS 
COAST PUB REP 

HOLLYWOOD — Bob Mc- 
Cluskey, former Billboard sales 
representative here, last week 
formed McCluskey Associates, a 
firm devoted to providing West 
Coast representation for music 
publishers. Publishing firms to 
be handled here by the McClus- 
key organization include Laurel. 
Sunbeam, Valando Music Com- 
pany, E. B. Marks, Musicon, 
Piedmont Music Company and 
Acuff-Rose Combine of Nash- 
ville. 

McCluskey, who will have his 
headquarters operations here at 
16S1 Cosmo Street, started han- 
dling the firms last week. 
Among his first activities are the 
West Coast coverage of Marks' 
Broadway show. "Tovarich." 
which opens Monday (18) in 
New York, and acquiring re- 
cordings of Valando's "She 
Loves Me" show, which bows on 
Broadway April 23. 

iiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniiii 




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MARCH 23, 1963 



SATISFYING NIGHT OUT 



Rooftops Ready, Come Rain or Shine 



By JACK MA HER 

There arc those close to the 
Rooftop Singers who aren't con- 
vinced the group is ready for 
in-person performances. Don't 
you believe it. No apologies are 
needed for the trio's singing. On 
stage, at the Village Gate in 
New York City in their first 
night club appearance (II), the 
few bumps and jars are easily 
lost in the high good humor and 
enthusiasm the singers display in 
performance. 

The Rooftops will be on hand 
at the Gate for four more weeks 
and the few inefficiences should 
easily be cleared up by then. 
In the meantime, anyone who 
happens to drop by the club 
can expect good old-fashioned 
revival and folk singing in the 
best tradition. Practically each 
tunc is dotted with that wide- 
open abandon that marks "Walk 
Right In," the group's big one 
on Vanguard Records, and its 
latest, "Tom Cat," which broke 
in at No. 96 on the Hot 100. 

The trio consists of Erick 
Darling, a veteran singer of the 
Tarriers, Weavers and a single 
folk act, ex-big band and Benny 
Goodman singer Lynne Taylor 
and newcomer Bill Svanoe. As 
a unit they seem to draw 
strength and excitement from 
one another. It's a happy act 
that bubbles on stage and ob- 
viously enjoys the success, ap- 
plause and laughter it brings 
to an audience. 

Sharing the bill with the 
Rooftop Singers is Leon Bibb, a 
performer who seems to grow 
in stature with each succeeding 
date. The Columbia Records 
artist presents his material, 
drawn mostly from the folk rep- 
ertoire, in a most dramatic 
fashion. 

He moves quickly and easily 
from work song to ballad with 
telling effect. Use of stage light- 
ing blackouts, movements and 
arrangements by Stewart Scharf 
all add to the imposing produc- 
tion. Typical is the way Bibbs 
sets up his version of "Summer- 
time." A bit of spoken back- 
ground and re-creation of the 
street calls that fill "Catfish 
Row" lead beautifully into the 




ROOFTOPS Erick Darling, Lynne Taylor, Bill Svanoe. 



mood and the feeling of the 
song. 

The third part of a most 
satisfying bill is Adam Keefe. 
This comic does impersonations, 
or this impersonator docs com- 
edy, it's hard to tell which 
way the development goes. In 
any case, Keefe presents con- 



temporary vaudeville at its best. 
His use of familiar celebrity 
voices are incorporated into bits 
about old, over-edited films, 
conversations between horror 
movie favorites and general com- 
mentaries on day to day living. 
TV could use Mr. Keefe to its 
advantage. 



TALENT TOPICS 



NEW YORK 

Imitation is the highest form 
of compliment and turnabout is 
fair play. The latest New Fron- 
tiersmanship talc is that oft- 
imitated First Lady Jacqueline 
Kennedy does a great take-off 
on songstress Peggy Lee doing 
"Mack the Knife." Whether true 
or not, it's a lovely image. . . . 
Noga Productions, Inc., headed 
by Johnny Mathis' manager 
Helen Noga has obtained U. S. 
rights from BBC-TV to a half- 
hour program which starred 
vocalist and the Ted Heath ork 
and which was aired in England 
last fall. She's seeking a network 
sale for the program, but not 
ruling out the syndication route. 
. . . Pianist-conductor Peter 
Duchin has extended his gig at 
the Maisonette in New York 
through June 8, and Dccca Rec- 
ords took advantage of situation 



Hey, Kids, Dr. Ki Ida re's in Town 




NEW YORK— Thousands of young ladies lined up in front 
of Stern's department store here last week for the privilege of 
shaking the hand of Richard Chamberlain, the Dr. Kildare of 
the popular TV show and MGM Records singing star. In order 
to shake the hand and get the autograph of the TV-record star 
the girls had to buy an MGM album called "Rhichard Chamber- 
lain Sings." And buy them they did to the tune of 1,000 sold 
in the hour-long appearance by Chamberlain at the store. 




to entitle his newest release "Peter 
Duchin at the Maisonette." . . . 
Dee Anthony, who manages 
singers Buddy Greco and Jerry 
Vale, has just signed pop singer 
Frank D'Rone, who is currently 
engaged at New York's Bon Soir 
on the bill with Kaye Ballard. 
. . . Elektra Records is pretty 
excited about their newly signed 
bluegrass band, the Dillards. 
Group has been club-dating it 
and make their Elektra album 
debut in April. ... If you find 
it hard going to sleep after 
watching "Tonight" show, don't 
count sheep, just run these sylla- 
bles over your tongue again and 
again: Lyle Cedric Henderson 
. . . Lyle Cedric Henderson . . . 
So what's wrong with "Skitch"? 

BARRY KITTLESON 

CHICAGO 

Playboy's new Sunday after- 
noon jazz policy is attracting a 
lot of the city's entertainers who 
usually have the time off and 
like to take a busman's holiday. 
Watching J. J. Johnson last Sun- 
day were Cy Coleman, writer of 
the Playboy Theme and cur- 
rently at the London House, and 
Barbara McNair, popular TV 
and club entertainer. . . . Danny 
Apolinar, swingin' jazz pianist 
who became popular playing the 
Playboy circuit, has a new al- 
bum out on Stereo-oddities this 
month, "Come by Sunday." 

Tony Dino, vocalist at Al 
Farber's Tree Room, has been 
signed by WBBM as lead vocal- 
ist for all its live music shows. 
He's a native Chicagoan and 
replaces Bob Vegas, who left 
in February to join the Playboy 
circuit. WBBM may also sign 
a vocal group shortly. ... It 
should be a regular gathering of 
the clan as Morton Downey Jr., 
weds Joan Tyrrell, Sabie model 
and ex-Playboy bunny-lovely. 
The knot will be lied at St. 
Henry's Church. March 19. 
Mercury's Morris Diamond will 
be best man with this reporter 
ushering in the guests who are 
expected to include: Jack Fine, 
Atlantic: Archie Bleyer and 
Johnny Tillotson from Cadence: 
Bill Gavin, Billboard's radio 
Continued on page 12 



TV QUEST APPEARANCES 
BY RECORD TALENT 

The nation*! network TV guest appearances lilted below provide outstanding promotional op- 
portunities for alert, aggressive record dealers and for all others who can benefit from the 
exposure of these record artists to millions of consumers. This chart should be used as a 
calendar around which to plan window, counter and other displays by which the TV appear- 
ances can be merchandised lo the record-buying public. 



MARCH 18-24 
(All Tim*s Eastern Standard) 



MONDAY T8-BUDDY GRECO 

Epic vocalist appears on the Westinghouse tape-syndicated Steve Allen show. 
Latest LP is "Soft and Gentle." 

MONDAY 18— TERESA BREWER 

Songstress sits in on the Tonight Show {NBC-TV, 11:15-1 a.m.). Her latest 
Coral single it "The Thrill Is Gone" b.w, "She'll Never Love You Like I Do." 

TUESDAY 19-JUDY GARLAND, ROBERT GOULET 

Both team up for special "Judy Garland and Her Guests . . ." (CBS-TV, 8 30- 
9:30 p.m.). Latest Columbia release for Goulet is "Annie Get Your Gun," 
with Doris Day. Judy is represented by several albums on Capitol. 

TUESDAY ,9-CAROL BURNETT 

Returning as guest of her former boss. Miss Burnett cuts up for Garry 

Moore show (CBS-TV, 10-11 p.m.). Latest single on Decca is "Nobody" b.w. 
"Sweet Georgia Brown." 

TUESDAY 19— BARRY SISTERS 

Duo headlines the Tonight Show guest list (NBC-TV, 11:15-1 a.m.). They may 
be heard on several LP's on Roulette. 

WEDNESDAY 20-SMOTHERS BROTHERS 

Folk-comedy duo appear on Steve Allen show. Their latest Mercury album, 
"Think Ethnic," was just released. 

WEDNESDAY 20-SANDY STEWART 

A regular on the Perry Coma Show (NBC-TV, 9-10 p.m.), Mist Stewart will 
plug her latest Colpii release "Promise of Love." 

THURSDAY 21— ANDRE PRIVIN 

Pianist-composer Previn siti in at the alano with Steve Allen tonight. Latest 
Columbia release is "SHtin' on a Rainbow." 

FRIDAY 22— ALLAN SHERMAN 

Comedy folkster is guest on the Steve Allen tape-syndicated show tonight. 
Latest Warner Bros, release is "My Son, the Celebrity." 

SUNDAY 24-GIORGIO TOZZI, PHYLLIS CURTIN, EUGENE LIST 

All |oin their talents on the "Voice of Firestone" (ABC-TV, 10-10:30 p.m.). 
Each Is well represented by various recordings on a variety of labels. 



ARTISTS' BIOGRAPHIES 

or your programming use here are pertinent facts about hot disk artists. If clipped and 
lasted on 3 by 5 cards these biographies will help you build a convenient file of such data. 




JAN BRADLEY 
Xy Bk (Chess) 

KBnk PERSONAL MANAGER: 

m\ Don Talty. BIRTHDAY: 
P^^Er ,ulv 6 ' l944 ' HOME TOWN: 

M BB Byhalia, Miss. EDUCA- 

(TION: Blue Island, III., Com- 
BtftgBV*>Bi munity High. HOBBIES: 
W Watching pro football 
games and reading. BACK- 
GROUND: Jan has been 
singing since the age of 6. 
She first came to the atten- 
tion of her manager, Don 
Talty, about four years ago. 
She was singing in a local talent show in Chicago with four 
boys. The group was called the Passions. At Tally's suggestion 
she began studying singing, dancing and modeling. About a 
year ago she cut her first record, "We Girls." on the Formal 
label. "Mama Didn't Lie" is her first hit. Jan is currently mak- 
ing personal appearances at clubs and theaters around the 
country and will appear soon on the Dick Clark show. 

LATEST SINGLE: "Mama Didn't Lie" continues to stay 
high on the Hot 100 chart, where it has been since the first of 
the year. 

LATEST ALBUM: Her first album will be released this 
month on Chess. It will feature a new song, "Along About 
Dark I Cry." 



TALENT ON TOUR 

(Top record talent in top record towns this week) 



EAST 

Kapp recording star Roger 
Williams headlining at the Wal- 
dorf-Astoria, New York, start- 
ing March 18 for three weeks. 
. . . Singer Johnny Tillotson re- 
turns after one-week hiatus to 
the Casino Royal, Washington 
(18). for another week. . . . 
Having broken in his new 
act at Chicago's Sahara Inn, 
singer - actor Frankie Avalon 
opens for two-week set at New 
York's Copacabana (21). . . . 
Thrush Patti Page begins a trail 
of club dates this week (21) at 
the Monticello Club, Framing- 
ham. Miss. . . . Singer Tony 
Bennett makes it to the Mosque 
Theater, Newark, N. J., for con- 



cert on Saturday night (23). . . . 
The famous Vienna Choir Boys 
take two nights at New York's 
Town Hall (22 and 23). 

MIDWEST 

Ben E. King bound for Chi- 
cago and one-week date at the 
Regal Theater (22). . . . Chi- 
cago's Palmer House hosts 
Elektra artists the Travelers 
Three for two weeks, beginning 
March 21. . . . Accordionist 
Dick Contino into the Embers 
on March 21 in Fort Wayne, 
Ind.. for 10 days. . . . Pianist 
Gina Bachauer at the Stuart 
Theater, Lincoln, Neb., March 
19 and the Municipal Audi- 
Conlinued on page 12 




THE GIANT SINGLE 
COMING TO LIFE! 






WRENCE 
OF ARABIA" 



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UNITED ARTISTS RECORDS UA 563 

Produced By Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller 



. & 
teieher 

the 

to 
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for yaung /„ WJ 



MOVING ON THE 
ALBUM CHARTS! 

THE KEYS TO 
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LOVE WALKED IN • ALONE TOGETHER • TAKE ME IN YOUR ARMS 
EAK LOW • YOU'RE TOO MUCH • TENDERLY • I ONLY HAVE EYES FOR YOU 
iBRACEABLE YOU • YOU DO SOMETHING TO ME • WHAT MORE CAN I SAY 
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12 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 




DAVE BRUBECK practices o little Maorian kissing with a Maori 
miss on his recent trip to New Zealand, and that looks like 
Bloody Mary in the background. 



TALENT TOPICS 



• Continued from page 10 

columnist; not to mention most 
of the local record and radio 
fraternity. No slacker, Downey 
is taping the Herb Lyons a day 
later (20). . . . Don Peachey, 
whose band records for Cadet 
Records, will appear at the Blue 
Moon Ballroom in Elgin, 111., 
in two weeks (30). . . . Johnny 
Hartman, soul-singer currently 
at the Playboy, just recorded an 
album with John Coltrane for 
Impulse. It's all ballads. . . . 
Ditto an album for Playboy's 
Danny Apolinar on the Stereo- 
oddities label titled, "Come By 
Sunday." . . . Fred Knapp, for- 
mer vocalist with the London- 
aires, is in town working on an 
industrial movie and putting to- 
gether a new vocal act. He just 
returned from a Dallas visit with 
producer Mark Sullivan. 

NICK BIRO 

NASHVILLE 

Jolly Joe Nixon, KVRE, Santa 
Rosa, Calif., reports heavy air 
play for the Wilburn Brothers' 
"Roll Muddy River." Jerry Brad- 
ley's swank office ncaring com- 
pletion on "Record Row." Jerry, 
son of Owen Bradley, to open 
publishing company. 

Acuff-Rose Artists Corpora- 
tion's Jim McConnell reports big 
show for Wichita Falls, Tex., 
for March 29. Line-up includes 
Faron Young, Roy Orbison, 
Lounie Wilson band. Halt and 
Scruggs, Jubilee Promenaders 
and L. D. Keller. 

Capa Records' prexy Doc 
Whiting in "Music City" last 
week. . . . The Mobile, Ala., la- 
bel chief leased Big John Wat- 
son's "Girls, Girls, Girls, Girls," 
to Dot Records during stay. 

Smiley Wilson, new talent di- 
rector for the Wil-Helm Agency, 
has Lorerta Lynn on a Hap 
Peebles tour through Kansas. 
Nebraska and Iowa in early 



April. Smiley reports successful 
p.a. bit for Wilburn and Don 
Helms in Texas last week. 

The Delcos* "Arabia" on 
Showcase could be a sleeper. It 
rated regional break-out in Pitts- 
burgh in Billboard last week, and 
is showing up on several dee- 
jay reports from around the 
country. Lawrence Welk ork to 
play benefit show here this 
month — already a sellout 
(15,000). 

BOSTON 

For the third time in three 
years Boston is to have a sum- 
mertime world premiere musical 
at the Colonial. It will be "Jen- 
nie," with Mary Martin, and 
based on the life of Lauren* 
Taylor. 

Boston's Frank Fontaine has 

signed for the Firemen's Ball at 
Boston Garden April 26. . . . 
Vaughn Monroe, taking things 
easy lately, will come into Blin- 
strub's, a first time for the local 
singer. The line-up at the big 
nitery includes Gisele MacKen- 
zie, Jack E. Leonard, Chubby 
Checker and Jimmy Dean. . . . 
Dorothy Dandridge surprised 
the Statler-Hilton by announcing 
that she is retiring. She canceled 
her Terrace Room engagement. 
The Met's Miml Benzell will fill 
her date April 29. 

Para* Page received an offer 
of $100,000 for a month in Las 
Vegas, so canceled her 10-day 
booking at the Framingham 
Monticello on March 21. But 
when she was told that the 
Monticello had booked a $15,- 
000 private party for her open- 
ing night she arranged to fly in 
for the one night. . . . The Mon- 
ticello is dickering for Vince 
(Dr. Casey) Edwards for a sum- 
mer date. Andy Williams is com- 
ing in May and Anna Marie 
Alberghetti is expected later. 

CAMERON DEWAR 



TALENT ON TOUR 



• Continued from page 10 

torium in San Antonio March 
22. . . . The Smothers Broth- 
ers still going collegiate at 
Wisconsin State (19), University 
of Kentucky (22) and Dcnnison 
College, Granville, Ohio (23). 
. . . Funny Phyllis Diller in 
Moorehead, N. D„ at the Cham- 
ber of Commerce Auditorium 
(18) and into the Sunset Steak 
House for five days thereafter. 
. . . Earl Wrightson and Lois 
Hunt headline at Sutmiller's in 
Dayton, Ohio, for week of 
March 18. 



WEST 

Rosemary Clooney runs 
across the hall from her current 
engagement at San Francisco's 
Fairmont Hotel to entertain IBM 
conventioneers (19). . . . The 
New Christy Minstrels mix it up 
at the Santa Monica Auditorium 
on Friday, March 22. . . . After 
closing at the Jazz Workshop in 
San Francisco last week, the Paul 
Winter Sextet opened at Den- 
ver's Band Box for two weeks 
(15). 



Vegas Place to Go if Artist 
Wants His Name in the Papers 



LAS VEGAS— The kind of publicity glitter 
everybody associates with the Vegas Strip sur- 
rounded the opening here of the United Artists 
picture, "Love Is a Ball," with more than 150 
newspapermen, television commentators and mag- 
azine feature writers filing thousands of words 
of copy. 

The weekend hoopla underlined this town's 
foremost position as exposure hub for live talent. 
Record artists who play any of the Las Vegas 
hotels get maximum of publicity mileage from 
their appearances. 

In the case of "Love Is a Ball," United Artists, 
the ABC-TV network, the Steve Allen show and 
the Dunes Hotel jointly arranged the doings. 

Allen kicked off the weekend by taping his 
syndicated television show from the Dunes Hotel. 
The 65-man cast and crew covered everything 



from the giant 36-foot Sultan astride the Dunes 
to the Persian Room, casino, swimming pool and 
Sultan's Table restaurant. 

The movie had its world premiere at the 
Huntridge Theater, a red-carpet affair with bands, 
klieg lights, remote radiocasts and many Holly- 
wood personalities. After that there was a 
champagne and caviar party at the Sultan's Table. 

ABC-TV cameras covered the party, and the 
sequence will be featured on the network's "Sun- 
day Night at the Movies" March 24. 

Glenn Ford, Hope Lange, Ricardo Montalban 
and Telly Savalas, stars of the picture, were guests 
of honor, and other stars on hand were Jimmy 
Durante, Helen Traubel, Robert Goulet, Myron 
Cohen, Pat Boone, Edie Adams, Billy Eckstine, 
Bob Crosby, Louis Prima, Sam Butera, Jerry 
Vale and the Kim Sisters. 




THE LAYOUT at the Dunes in Las Vegas, scene 
of recent movie opening festivities connected 
with United Artists' "Love Is a Ball." Steve 
Allen's television cameras recorded much of 



the weekend action and was presented as 
part of his syndicated Westinghouse TV night- 
ly show, seen in 126 markets across the 
country. 





STEVE IN ACTION: At premiere party, he in- 
terviews Hope lange, while Glenn Ford and 
Edie Adams (far right) and Las Vegas show 
girls mill around. TV show of event is sched- 
uled for most cities night of March 22. 



BAND SERENADE: Las Vegas High School 
band— 125 strong— greet the incoming stars 
from Hollywood at McCarran Airport. Guest 
band leader is Philips Records artist Michel 
Legrand. School group often plays for in- 
coming acts. 





WELCOME: Dunes Hotel president M. A. Riddle 
is on hand to handshake "Love Is a Ball" stars 
Hope Lange and Glenn Ford. Then premiere 
festivities got under way. They lasted for 
three days and got wide press and television 
coverage across the U. S. 



EN ROUTE: Miss Lange and Ford arrive at 
Dunes, marked by 36-foot figure of Sultan 
astride hotel. Interviews with newspaper and 
magazine reporters on hand, besides tele- 
vision appearances, gave big promotion push 
to the movie bow-in. 



CASH IN ON THE BIGGEST 
TRAFFIC BUILDER EVER! 




ONLY $ 1 FOR ANY 
KINGSTON TRIO ALBUM... 

WITH ONE AT THE REGULAR PRICE 

There's never been anything like this before! The world's #1 vocal group is riding high, and Capitol 
is going all out on this promotion. Full page ads in LIFE, PLAYBOY and SEVENTEEN ! Ads in over 
100 college newspapers! And a whole array of merchandising aids including PLAYBOY counter 
cards, LIFE ad reprints, color rack merchandisers, catalog supplements, four color window units, 
color counter browser cards, window streamers ... no doubt about it : this is a complete and com- 
prehensive merchandising program really geared to make money for you! 

There are 16 Kingston Trio albums, including their brand new "#16", to choose from . . . and mil- 
lions of Trio fans are going to be doing just that! 

Be ready for them... see your CRDC representative for all the details! 
t A. your option, Mr. Deaier. (Mfc^) ill I jj III! I ||l 1 1 I 

\. RECORDS / E7DG-TY6-JZS5 



Cor 



14 BILLBOARD 



{ 



COUNTRY MUSIC 



MARCH 23, 1963 



Oscar Davis Sets 
3 C.&W. Specs 

CINCINNATI — Veteran 
c.&w. producer-promoter, Oscar 
Davis, who chalked a $116,000 
gross with a country music pack- 
age on nine one-nighters through 
the Southwest and California in 
January, is taking a unit com- 
prising 17 c.&w. names intn 
12,500-seat Cobo Hall. Detroit, 
for three performances May 5. 

Davis also has a 15-act pack- 
age set for two performances at 
the Fairgrounds Coliseum, In- 
dianapolis, April 21, and a 14- 
act unit for Ellis Auditorium, 
Memphis, March 31. All units 
will carry the banner of the Rav 
Price Enterprises. 

Talent for the three contin- 
gents will be made up of the fol- 
lowing performers: Ray Price, 
George Jones, Webb Pierce, 
Faron Young, Johnny Wright, 
Kitty Wells, Stonewall Jackson, 
Bill Phillips, Roger Mi'ler, Carl 
Smith, Jimmy Dickens, Billy 
Walker, Billy Grammer, Claude 
King, Skeeter Davis, Ralph 
Emery, George Riddle, Red 
Sovine, Carl Butler, Minnie 
Pearl, Hank Snow. Flatt and 
Scruggs, and Grandpa Jones. 



Seriously . . . 




"Let's Talk 
Things Over" 

about 

"SMSIM 



& VIA 

Do-Rq-Mo 1432 

BOB 
TAYLOR 

Perioral Management; 
Ray Ullar 
Box 3897 
Tulie 14, 0kl«,-NA 7-6493 

THANK GOD 
FOR THE U.S.A.' 

b/w 

'My God's Everywhere' 

MMM 

The WEBSTER BROS. 



RECORDS 



'O BOX 701 NASHVILLE 2, TENN 
CYPRESS 7-4967 



Tree Moving to 
Larger Quarters 

NASHVILLE— Tree Publish- 
ing Company, Inc., headed by 
Jack Stapp and Buddy Killen, 
will occupy new and larger quar- 
ters at 905 16th Avenue, South, 
beginning May 1. 

Liberty Records artist, Timi 
Yuro, flew here last week on an 
invitation from Killen to look 
over material at Tree and other 
local publishing houses. Timi 
was accompanied here by Liber- 
ty a.&r. man, Ed Silvers. 

Added to Tree's songwriting 
staff here last week was James 
Reymer, of Arlington, Va. 
Justin Tubb, exclusive Tree writ- 
er, had a release last week on 
Groove Records, RCA Victor's 
newly reactivated subsidiary. 
Sides are "Take a Letter, Miss 
Gray" and "Here I Sit Await- 
ing." 



Haddock Kicks Off 
New Eagle Label 

KERMIT, Tex. — Vaughn 
Brinson, Texas record promoter, 
has announced the formation of 
Eagle Records, with headquar- 
ters here, and the signing of 
Durwood Haddock as the artist 
on the firm's initial release. 
Haddock is the writer of "I 
Don't Wanta," recorded by the 
late Patsy Cline, and co-writer 
of "There She Goes," the stand- 
ard waxed by Miss Cline, Carl 
Smith and Jerry Wallace, among 
others. 

Already set to handle distribu- 
tion for the new label are H. W. 
(Pappy) Daily, Houston; Big 
State Distributors, Dallas; M. 
B. Krupp Record Distributors, 
El Paso, Tex., and Phoenix, 
Ariz.; Music Box One-Stop, Dal- 
las, and Daily Records, San An- 
tonio. 



COUNTRY MUSIC CORNER 

By BILL SACHS 



Ira Louvin is mending from 
his recent misfortune. Friends 
may write to him in care of Sta- 
tion WSM, Nashville. . . . Jim- 
mie Driftwood, who has been 
keeping busy on college dates 
In recent weeks, has been en- 
gaged as a feature of the Ar- 
kansas Folk Festival to be held 
in Mountain View, Ark., April 
19-21. . . . Having passed his 
test for a pilot's license, Jim 
Reeves is reported shopping for 
an air chariot to carry him and 
his Blue Boys on future engage- 
ments. . . . Bad Crowder and 
his Toppa recording band are 
appearing six nights a week at 
the Maverick Club, Las Vegas, 
from where they do a remote 
broadcast each Sunday after- 
noon. Meanwhile Bud continues 
as country deejay five hours 
daily over KTOO Radio, Hen- 
derson, Nev. 



BREAKING OUT IN PH/UY, 
CALIF- AND THl SOUTH 

JOHNNY FOSTER'S 

GROWN-UPS CRY TOO 
THERE'S NO END 

A GREAT COUNTRY HIT 

OJ„ Writ.: 

CAPA RECORDS 

803-R Gov'l Si.. Mob.lo, Ala. 



SHERRY'S 



LIPS 



b/w 



"MISS BROWN" 

-3583 Phillipt International 

David Houston 

Sun Records 

639 Madison Mtmphii, Tonn. 



On Route To Being A Hi I! 



HICKORY 
1201 



ihterstateJ 

FORTY "j 




The 2,000 inmates of the Ne- 
braska State Penitentiary, Lin- 
coln, will be treated to a country 
music show March 22, with ar- 
rangements being handled by 
Harry (Hap) Peebles, Wichita, 
Kan., promoter. Participating in 
the show will be Tex Rittcr, 
Lonzo and Oscar, Hank Snow 
and His Rainbow Ranch Boys, 
Melba Montgomery, Kafhy Per- 
ry and Johnnie Lee Wills and 
band. The acts will be on the 
wind-up of a Midwestern tour 
for Peebles, which finds them 
routed for Sioux City, la., March 
19; Sioux Falls, S. D., 29; 
Omaha, 21; Lincoln, 22, and 
Lawrence, Kan., 23. . . . With 
Marty Robbins and Jerry Bvrd 
featured, the Lima, Ohio, Jay- 
cees enjoyed two sellout per- 
formances with their fifth annual 
"Grand Ole Opry" show pre- 
sented there recently. Tom Fran- 
cis, who handled arrangements, 
says it was the Jaycees' biggest 
show yet, and they hope to make 
it even bigger and better next 
year. 

Hal G. Neely, general man- 
ager of King Records, last week 
launched a special promotion on 
the Hawkshaw Hawkins release, 
"Lonesome 7-7203." To aid in 
the promotion, Neely has dis- 
patched to all King salesmen, 
branches and distributors, a 
novel promotion piece to catch 
the eye of the key deejays, sta- 
tion personnel, music shop clerks 
and one-stop operators. The 
promotion piece reads "Dial 
Hitsville — LOnesome 7-7203. 
Hawkshaw Hawkins, King 
5712." To get added attention, 
a dime is scotch-taped over the 
letter I in the word Dial. Credit 
for the idea goes to Bob Earl, 
of the King San Francisco 
branch. 

A likeness of the well-known 
Canadian-American c.&w. sing- 
er, Wilf Carter (Montana Slim) 
is being readied for placement in 
the new Calgary, Alta., Wax 
Museum. For the recent winter 
carnival in Fort William, Ont., 
CJLX deejay, Dave Carter, built 
a feature around Wilfs first 
record, "The Capture of Albert 
Johnson." . . . Marvin Hughes, 
veteran music director at WSM. 
Nashville, is new a.&r. man for 
Capitol Records in Music City. 
... Biff Collie, KFOX jock. 
Long Beach, Calif., and promo- 
tioneer Don Sessions have just 
completed a swing of Arizona 
radio stations to pitch Collie's 
new taped c.&w. show deal and 
to promote Buddy Cagle's new 
Capitol release, "Your Mother's 
Prayer." During their Tucson, 



HOT COUNTRY SI1VGZ.ES 



f 



Thii Lad 
Week Wnk 



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SPECIAL SURVEY 

FOR WEEK ENDING 3/23/63 

•Ml m 

litlr, Artiit. Ltbfl a No. On* 
DON'T LET ME CROSS OVER 16 

Carl Butlpr, Columbia 42593 

FROM A JACK TO A KING 13 

Ned Miller, Fabor 114 

SECOND HAND ROSE 14 

Roy Drusky, Docca 31443 

END OF THE WORLD 14 

Skeeter Davit, RCA Victor B098 

BALLAD OF JED CLAMPETT 16 

Letter Flatt * Earl Scruggs, Columbia 42606 

IS THIS ME? 7 

Jim Reeves, RCA Victor 8127 

I TAKE THE CHANCE 13 

Ernett Ashworth, Hickory 1189 

THE YELLOW BANDANA 4 

Faron Young, Mercury 72085 

STILL 5 

Bill Anderson, Decca 31458 

T FOR TEXAS 15 

Grandpa Jones, Monument 801 

NOT WHAT I HAD IN MIND 7 

George Jones, United Artists 528 

YOU TOOK HER OFF MY HANDS 4 

Ray Price, Columbia 42658 

MR. HEARTACHE, MOVE ON 9 

Coleman O'Neal, Chancellor 108 

CANT HANG UP THE PHONE 9 

Stonewall Jackson, Columbia 42628 

WALK ME TO THE DOOR 3 

Ray Price, Columbia 42638 

HELLO TROUBLE 18 

Orville Couch, Vee Jay 470 

LEAVIN' ON YOUR MIND 6 

Patiy Cline, Decca 31455 

KNOCK AGAIN, TRUE LOVE 5 

Claude Gray, Mercury 72063 

PLEASE TALK TO MY HEART 3 

Country Johnny Mathts, United Artists 536 

YOU'RE FOR ME 13 

Buck Owens, Capitol 4872 

ROBERT E. LEE 6 

OH Stephens, Chancellor 107 

IN THIS VERY SAME ROOM 5 

George Hamilton IV, RCA Victor 8118 

A STRANGER WAS HERE 8 

Darrell McCall, Philips 40079 

LONESOME 7-7203 2 

Hawkshaw Hawkins, King 5712 

FADED LOVE 10 

Leon McAuliff, Cimarron 4057 

ALL GROWN UP 5 

Johnny Horton, Columbia 42653 

STILL LOVING YOU 2 

Clyde Beavers, Tempwood 1039 

LONELY TEARDROPS 2 

Rose Moddox. Capitol 4905 

SAWMILL 3 

Webb Pierce, Decca 31451 

CIGARETTES AND COFFEE BLUES 1 

Marty Robbins, Columbia 42701 



WITH THE COUNTRY JOCKEYS 



By BILL SACHS 



Jimmy Logsdon, host of "Jam- 
boree," c.&w. music seg on 
WCKY, Cincinnati, last week 
signed a three-year recording 
pact with King Records. Jimmy's 
initial release will be an album 
of old-time favorites plus several 
originals. Formerly with WGEE, 
Indianapolis, and WHAS-TV, 
Louisville, Logsdon has con- 
ducted WCKY's "Jamboree" 
since last June. He is heard 
every week-day, 7 to 11 p.m. 
Jimmy invites country artists 
traveling the area to drop in for 
a guest shot. Guests the past 
week included Early Taylor, who 
is heard on Capitol; Esco Hank- 
ins, Briar Records artist, and 
Lattie Moore, who was in town 
to record for King Records. 

Ariz., stop-off, Biff displayed 
his singing and horn-blowing 
talents in a show at Tucson 
Gardens. 



Ned Lukens, formerly with 
WAOK, Atlanta, as Jack the 
Bellboy, has moved to WIIN, 
Atlanta's "good music" station. 
. . . Reg Gale is spinning c.&w. 
disks, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Mon- 
day through Saturday, on CHIC, 
Brampton, Ont. . . . Jim Synott 
has joined the staff of WEAS, 
5,000-watter in Savannah, Ga., 
where he's serving as news direc- 
tor for the all-country station. 
In addition, Jim conducts the 
"Coastal Empire Jamboree" 
platter show each afternoon. . . . 
Shreveport, La., now boasts 
two all-country music stations — 
KCIG and KREB. Sammy 
David is KCIG program direc- 
tor, and Bill Horton, deejay. 
Deejays at KREB arc Doug 
Davidson and Bill Atkins. Gos- 
pel music program on KCIG is 
conducted by Rev. Billy Franks, 
brother of Tillman Franks, pro- 
moter-manager. 



THE BIGGEST IN PHILADELPHIA 
NOW BREAKING OUT IN DETROIT, 
BALTIMORE, NEW YORK and MIAMI 




P863 




Hippies 



(formerly the Tarns) 



THE B/G ONES ARE 



CAMEO/PARKWAY 



Cop 



16 BILLBOARD 



{ 



RHYTHM & BLUES 



MARCH 23, 1963 



West Coast NARA 
Names Unit Heads 



By GODFREY LEHMAN 

SAN FRANCISCO — The 
West Coast organizational meet- 
ing of the National Association 
of Radio Announcers was held 
in San Francisco recently. Dee- 
jays representing several West- 
ern States, principally from the 
Los Angeles and San Francisco 
areas, attended the meeting and 
named presidents of the two 
chapters. 

Rudy Harvey of KGFJ, Los 
Angeles, heads the Southern 
California chapter, and Al 
Moreland of both KSAN, San 
Francisco, and KDIA, Oakland, 
heads the Northern California 
chapter. Vice-president for Los 
Angeles is Art Jackson, formerly 
of KTYM, but no vice-president 
was named for Northern Cali- 
fornia. 

Floyd Ray, also of KTYM, 
was elected as liaison officer be- 
tween the national association 
and the West Coast chapters, 
and Larry MacCormick of 
KGFJ is executive secretary. 
Bugs Scruggs, of KSAN, hosted 



the group as West Coast re- 
gional director, previously ap- 
pointed by the national associa- 
tion. 

The second meeting is sched- 
uled for Sunday, April 7, at the 
Knickerbocker Hotel in Holly- 
wood. A resolution adopted at 
the San Francisco meeting calls 
for each regional group to nomi- 
nate three stations in its area 
as candidates for one or more 
of three awards to be presented 
at the national convention, also 
to be held at the Knickerbocker 
Hotel, August 22-25. The cate- 
gories include best program and 



production, best handling of 
news and special events, and 
public service above and beyond 
FCC requirements among r.&b. 
stations. 

Discussions centered around 
programming policies and r.&b. 
stations, and the concern of 
trade publications and industry 
critics about such programming. 
Questions were considered re- 
garding improving the quality of 
programming, and the public at- 
tudes toward Negro program 
stations. 

The group is considering a 
committee to assist member sta- 
tions in improving their pro- 
gramming and to create a gen- 
erally better r.&b. station image. 

A member at large of the 
executive committee will be 
elected at the Los Angeles meet- 
ing on April 7. 



R & B ROUNDUP 



By NICK BIRO 
(Chicago Office) 

The Cookies ("Don't Say 
Nothin' Bad About My Baby") 
moved into New York's Apollo 
Theater March 15. Their disk 
is currently breaking around the 



WHAT'S "BIG" 
AND "LITRE" 
AND GROOVY 
ALL OVER! 

LENOX RECORDS 
RELEASE NO. 5565, 
WATS WHAT! 



country. . . . Dimension Rec- 
ords' Little Eva is back in New 
York, following a 30-day pro- 
motion tour. She begins rehears- 
ing next week for a new single 
to come out by the end of 
March. . . . Dimension also has 
a Big Dee Irving disk on the 
way. . . . Danny Davis, new 
sales and promotion manager for 
Dimension, is off on a national 
promotion tour. Barney Williams 
is just back from a tour of the 
South and East. . . . Dimension 
turned Wisconsin distribution 
over to Jack Solinger in Chi- 
cago. John O'Brien in Milwau- 
kee formerly had the line. . . . 
Lou Christie is putting out 'Two 
Faces Have I" as a follow-up to 
"The Gypsy Cried," which is 
still selling. . . . Roulette's Bud 
Katzell tells us he's just cut a 
new Sam and Dave single, "It 
Was So Nice While It Lasted." 
. . . Roulette just made two dis- 
tributor changes: From M-S to 
Allstate in Chicago and from 
Pelican to Delta in New Orleans. 



BREAKING 
ALL OVER 

"YOU 
KNOW 

IT AIN'T 
RIGHT" 

BY 

JOE 
HINTON 

BACKBEAT #537 

BACKBEAT 
RECORDS 

2809 ERASTUS STREET 
HOUSTON 26, TEXAS 



This 


last 


Week 


Week 


1 


4 


2 


9 


3 


•a 

o 


4 


2 


5 


6 


6 


1 1 


7 


1 


8 


1 7 


9 


1 0 


1 0 


7 


1 1 


5 


12 


1 1 


1 3 


20 


1 4 




1 5 


8 


1 6 


13 


1 7 


24 


1 8 


23 


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14 


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Billboard SPECIAL SURVEY 

FOR WEEK ENDING 3/23/63 

Wttki m 

lull. AiT.ii, label * No Chart 

OUR DAY WILL COME 4 

Ruby & the Romantici, Kapp 401 

SEND ME SOME LOVIN' 7 

Sam Cooke. RCA Victor 8129 

WALK LIKE A MAN 7 

4 S«otont, Vee Jay 485 

HEY PAULA 8 

Paul & Paula, Philipi 40084 

RUBY BABY 7 

Dior*, Columbia 42662 

CALL ON ME 8 

Bobby Bland, Duke 360 

THAT'S THE WAY LOVE IS 10 

Bobby Bland, Duke 360 

HE'S SO FINE 4 

Chiffons, Laurie 3132 

MAMA DIDN'T LIE 8 

Jan Bradley, Chess 1845 

RHYTHM OF THE RAIN 5 

Cascades, Valiant 6026 

YOU'VE REALLY GOT A HOLD ON ME. 13 

Miracles, Tamla 54073 

YOU'RE THE REASON I'M LIVING .... 7 

Bobby Darin, Capitol 4897 

TELL HIM I'M NOT HOME 5 

Chuck Jackson, Wand 132 

BABY WORKOUT 1 

Jackie Wilson, Brunswick 55239 

WALK RIGHT IN 9 

Rooftop Singer,, Vanguard 35017 

HITCH HIKE 7 

Marvin Gay«, Tomla 54075 

END OF THE WORLD 2 

Skeeter Dovis, RCA Victor 8098 

DONT SET ME FREE 3 

Ray Charles, ABC-Paramount 10405 

SOUTH STREET 4 

Orion*, Cameo 243 

THESE ARMS OF MINE 1 

Otis Redding, Volt 103 

LAUGHING BOY 4 

Mary Wells, Motown 1039 

LET'S TURKEY TROT 5 

Little Eva, Dimtniion 1006 

HOW CAN I FORGET 1 

Ben E. King, Atca 6256 

LET'S LIMBO SOME MORE 1 

Chubby Checker, Parkway 862 

RAINBOW 7 

Gene Chandler, Vee Jay 466 

WHAT WILL MY MARY SAY 3 

Johnny Mathii, Columbia 42666 

ONE BROKEN HEART FOR SALE 1 

Elvis Presley. RCA Victor B134 

WILD WEEKEND 2 

Rebels, Swan 4125 

HOW CAN I FORGET 1 

Jimmy Holiday, Everest 2022 

IN DREAMS 1 

Roy Orbison, Monument 806 



A Two-sided Hit) 

ANTHONY NEWLEY 

"THERE'S NO SUCH 
THING AS LOVE" 

b/w 

"SHE'S JUST 
ANOTHER GIRL" 

LONDON #5201 

JOJYDON 





ROM 




20th FOX 




MARILYN SINGS 




HER GREATEST 




HITS 


'MARILYN' 




FXG 5000 



Headed for a HHI 

'COME AND GET 
THESE MEMORIES' 

MARTHA & 
THE VANDELLAS 

Gordy #7014 
MOTOWN/TAMU RECORDS 

2648 West Grand Blvd. 
Detroit, Mich. 



In The Chart*// 

"I'M EVIL" 

b/w 

"IF YOU EVER HEED ME" 

LIGHTNIN' SLIM 

(The Hit- Maker! 

Ixcelle mt 

Nathboro Record Co. 



FOLLOW-UP 

TO HER SMASH HIT! 



SANDY STEWART 

PROMISE of LOVE'.. 




COLPIX RECORDS A Division of Columbia Pictures, Corp. 711 FIFTH AVE., N.Y. 



18 BILLBOARD 



' 

CLASSICAL MUSIC 



MARCH 23, 1963 



Victor Opera Plan in Works: 
5-Foot Shelf of Masterpieces 



NEW YORK— A plan for the 
marketing of classical records is 
in the germinating stage at RCA 
Victor which would encourage 
bulk purchases of basic libraries 
of disks, beginning with operas. 

The plan is not likely to go 
into effect for a few months, but 
it is the outgrowth of the con- 
viction held by George Marek, 
vice-president and general man- 
ager of the company, that the 
record industry "is not filling the 
latest demand of the public for 
good music, and certainly not 
for operatic recordings. The 
taste and appetite of the public 
are considerably better than our 
industry's merchandising meth- 
ods." 

The basis of the plan will be 
the marketing of RCA Victor's 
equivalent of the famed "five- 
foot shelf of books" which pre- 
sents a collection of what is 
deemed the finest in literature. 

A package of the greatest 



operas — the exact number may 
vary between 8 and 12 — will be 
put together and offered as a 
single sales unit, so that with 
a single purchase a customer 
will be able to take home the 
top operatic works in the cata- 
log — all, Marek hopes, on his 
label. 

Recognizing some of the basic 
problems that exist in making 
this blueprint workable, Marek 
is working on an installment 
purchase approach. He is aware 
that packages of this size could 
make restrictive demands on 
dealer inventory and shelf 
space, but he feels these prob- 
lems can be ironed out, with 
one possibility that some dealers 
would have only one set avail- 
able for display and demo pur- 
poses, with orders filled from 
distributors. He also indicated 
that dealers who wished to keep 
the sets in stock might be 
granted some financial leeway 
in payments, "but then they'd 



really have to sell .... we 
couldn't afford to give anything 
like this for nothing." 

As to the perennial problem 
with such package ideas — that 
customers may already own one 
or more of the disks and thus 
turn down the package — Marek 
indicates his desire to be flexi- 
ble. "I'm trying to work out 
some practical substitution 
plan," he said, "which might 
even permit replacement of in- 
dividual LP's from this package 
with something from another 
label." 

The opera series, if success- 
ful, could well be the forerun- 
ner of other classical library 
packages, such as the great sym- 
phonies, the top chamber works, 
the leading piano concertos, 
etc. AH would be put together 
with the same basic premise: 
appealing packaging and sim- 
plified shopping, in which the 
element of confusion and choice 
is eliminated. 



Szell in 50th Year: Formidable 



NEW YORK — Seventeen 
years at the helm as conductor 
of theCleveland Orchestra has 
earned George Szell a reputation 
as a "master builder of orches- 
tras." To judge by the reaction 
to his recent concert tour, Szell 
has clearly earned a place for the 
Cleveland Orchestra among that 
handful of really exquisite vir- 
tuoso ensembles in this country, 
if not in the world. 

Born in Budapest and reared 
in Vienna, Maestro Szell is this 
year celebrating his 50th anni- 
versary as a conductor. The an- 
niversary year is being high- 
lighted by an extended concert 
tour with the Cleveland, as well 
as many guest conducting ap- 
pearances. He is currently en- 
gaged for a series of 12 concerts 
with the New York Philhar- 
monic. National coverage by at 
least two of the largest circu- 
lating weekly news magazines 
have made him the center of 
musical attention. 

Epic Push 

Responsible for the bulk of 
the promotion around the Cleve- 
land Orchestra and George Szell 
is Epic Records, who have com- 
memorated Szell's Golden Jubi- 
lee Year with special advertis- 
ing, promotion and merchandis- 
ing aids. Starting in April, every 
Szell recording released by Epic 
will display a special 50th an- 
niversary emblem. For use by 
the Cleveland Orchestra on its 
recent tour. Epic prepared some 
100,000 handsome brochures, 
complete with a discography of 
Szell's work for the label. 

Szell's April releases on Epic 
will be the Mendelssohn Sym- 
phony No. 4 ("Italian') b-w the 
Hebrides Overture and Weber's 
Oberon Overture plus an album 



AT WORK: George Szell shown with Robert Casadesus during 
recent recording session for Columbia Mozart album of Piano 
Concerto No. 2 D Major "Coronation" and Piano Concerto No. 
27 in B-Flat Major. 



of waltzes by Johann and Josef 
Strauss. 

Following is a list of 10 al- 
bums supplied by Epic Records 
which represent the best-selling 
disks to date for Szell and the 
Cleveland Orchestra. Not in- 
cluded on the list are albums 
which feature Cleveland pianist 
Leon Fleisher. 

Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 

("Eroica") — LC 338S (M); 

BC 1001 (s) 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 5; 

Schubert: Symphony No. 8 

(Unfinished)— LC 3195 (M) 
Beethoven: Symphony No. 6 

("Pastoral")— LC 3849; BC 

1249 (S) 
Dvorak: Symphony No. 4 — LC 

3532 (M); BC 1015 (S) 
Haydn: Symphonies Nos. 88 

and 104 — LC 3196 (M) 
Mozart: Clarinet Concerto; R. 

Strauss: Horn Concerto No. 

I— LC 3841 <M); BC 1241 

(S) 

Schubert: Symphony No. 7 (9) 
("The Great")— LC 3431 (M); 
BC 1009 (S) 



R. Strauss: Don Quixote — 
Pierre Foumler, Cello — LC 
3786 (M); BC 1135 (S) 

R. Strauss: Till Eulenspiegel's 
Merry Pranks; Don Juan; 
Death and Transfiguration — 
LC 3439 (M>, BC 1011 (S) 

Tchaikovsky: Capriccio Ifalicn; 
Rimsky-Korsakov: Capriccio 
Espagnol; Borodin: Polovet- 
sian Dances; Moussorgsky: 
Dawn on the Moska River — 
LC 3483 (M); BC 1002 (S) 



CRACKING RADIO TIME 
FOR NEW CLASSICAL 
LP'S OFTEN TOUCH JOB 

By BARRY KJTTLESON 

NEW YORK — The problem of radio exposure of classical re- 
leases poses problems that are similar to, yet different from, those in- 
volving pop singles. The objective is the same: to get as much airing 
as possible across the country, so the record-buyers can get a sampling 
to whet their appetites. But radio programming techniques are 
completely dissimilar, for the most part. 
In fact, it is the very diversity 



of classical programming that 
creates some of the difficulty. 
There is no real longhair equiv- 
alent of the "Top 40," so no 
simple yardsticks obtain. And, of 
course, the length of time re- 
quired for the average classical 
selection adds yet another com- 
plication. Thus, each station's 
policy must be examined indi- 
vidually. 

Two very successful classical 
program directors in New York 
are Martin Bookspan of WQXR, 
and Lyman Clardy, who is re- 
sponsible for some 38 hours of 
music per week as producer of 
the CBS "Music Till Dawn" 
show, sponsored by American 
Airlines in nine major markets 
in the U. S. Both men share in 
the sentiment that their "primary 
concern is music — not records" 
— if the two can really be sep- 
arated — but they express this 
sentiment in quite opposite 
fashion. 

Blazed Path 

WQXR was one of the pio- 
neers in serious music program- 
ming. Due to publication date 
of a monthly program guide, 
programming is done some six 

Artists Guild Honor 
To Rudolph Bing 

NEW YORK — In his 1 3th 
year as general manager of the 
Metropolitan Opera, Rudolf 
Bing was honored by the Con- 
cert Artists Guild at a dinner 
concert at the Hotel Plaza 
March 7. He received the 
Guild's 1962-1963 Award for 
his encouragement of young art- 
ists. 

Bing has been instrumental in 
recognizing the talent and shap- 
ing the careers of such artists 
as Roberta Peters, George Lon- 
don, Lucine Amara, Cesare 
Siepi and others. The city of 
New York also presented its 
highest music award, the Handel 
Memorial Medal, to Bing on 
this occasion. 



weeks in advance of airing. Cer- 
tain of the broadcasts have pre- 
planned gaps where new re- 
leases "may" be inserted. With 
the exception of specialty shows, 
which may feature contempo- 
rary music or some such, pro- 
gramming is most often keyed to 
"popular" classics of the roman- 
tic and classical periods with an 
emphasis on "melody." 

Industry-sponsored shows in- 
clude a one-hour-a-week "RCA 
Victor Showcase," and half-hour 
weekly spots like "London Hi- 
lights," and "Sol Hurok Pre- 
sents. . . ." For the most part, 
new releases arc given little spe- 
cial attention under this format 
for immediate play, except, of 
course, on the sponsored spots 
mentioned. 

The philosophy of Lyman 
Clardy is another story. "Music 
Till Dawn," which celebrates its 
10th year on April 14, employs 
new classical releases with regu- 
larity. 

Clardy's predilection for new 
(Continued on page 22) 



Epic in Big Push 
For Cleveland Ork 

NEW YORK — Epic Records, 
currently mounting a hefty pro- 
motion drive on the Cleveland 
Orchestra, on the occasion of 
conductor George Szell's 50th 
Anniversary on the podium, has 
released a special Cleveland Or- 
chestra sampler with a sug- 
gested list of $1.98, stereo or 
monaural. Title of the set is 
"Showpieces for the Virtuoso 
Orchestra," with material by 
Tchaikovsky, Wagner, Men- 
delssohn, Stravinsky, Richard 
Strauss and Johann Strauss II 
included. 

The "Showpiece" set is a key 
item in the label's current new 
releases and 37 selected items 
from the catalog. The program, 
according to national sales chief, 
Len Levy, extends through 
March 29. 



Gold Disks Come Doroti's Way 



Philadelphia Orchestra Members 
Want- Longer Season, Higher Pay 



PHILADELPHIA — Phila- 
delphia Orchestra members are 
seeking to extend the orchestra 
season from 33 to 42 weeks. The 
change was one of list of con- 
tract requests approved by the 
members and submitted to their 
Union, Local 77, AFMO. The 
musicians hope to begin negotia- 
tions with the Orchestra Asso- 
ciation on next season's contract 
within the next few weeks. 

Other demands include a $10- 



a-week increase of pay. now at 
$190. The members also arc ask- 
ing a 15 per cent reduction in 
the orchestra's "services," de- 
spite the requested extension of 
the season. A spokesman said 
the reduction would apply to re- 
hearsals and recordings, and not 
to public concerts. The members 
also seek a share in the royalties 
for recordings, which now go 
to the Orchestra Association, 
(he conductor and soloists. 



NEW YORK — For many 
years affiliated with the Minne- 
apolis Symphony Orchestra, con- 
ductor-at-large Antal Dorati re- 
cently won the record industry's 
gold disk award for his Mer- 
cury recording of Tchaikovsky's 
1812 Festival Overture, which 
has passed the million-dollar 
mark in record sales. 

Mercury Records also hon- 
ored Maestro Dorati with a gold 
disk to commemorate the sale 
of more than one and a half 
million copies of his classical 
records during the past decade. 
That list includes more than 100 
different titles. 

Since resigning his post with 
the Minneapolis group. Dorati 
has become the principal con- 
ductor of the BBC Symphony 
and frequent guest conductor of 
a variety of other aggregations, 
such as the London Symphony 
Orchestra, Covent Garden. Aix- 
en-Provence Festival Orchestra 
and many others. He will take 
the London Symphony Orches- 



tra to Japan for the Osaka Fes- 
tival next month. 

A composer, too, Dorati's can- 
tata "The Way of the Cross" en- 



joyed a highly successful Paris 
premiere recently. April will 
mark a recording First when 
(Continued on page 22) 




TOP CLASS: Irving Green, Mercury Records, congratulates Antal 
Dorati for his gold medal award presented for the conductor's 
recording of "Tchaikovsky's 1812 Festival Overture," which 
passed million-dollar mark in sales. 



THE CHALLENGE 



THE SOUND 
ON THIS NEW RCA VICTOR RECORD 
CHALLENGES COMPARISON WITH THE SOUND 
ON ANY OTHER RECORD AVAILABLE 
ON ANY LABEL ANYWHERE 




WHAT THE CRITICS SAY 



UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL 
". . . free of distortion and special equipment is not needed to play it." 
"This new process possibly is the greatest breakthrough in recorded sound 
since the introduction of the long play record." 

Raymond Ericson, NEW YORK TIMES (broadcast on WQXR) 
"Recorded in Victor's new Dynagroove process, the engineering results in 
sound of perfect clarity and balance. This is the best available disc ver- 
sion of the opera (Madama Butterfly); and it is an inspired recording." 

Douglas Watt. NEW YORK NEWS (broadcast on WQXR) 
"... a fair comparison between . . . new Dynagroove releases 
and some recent releases of a similar nature on other labels indicated a 
dramatic advance in fidelity." 



Conrad Osborne. HIGH FIDELITY 

". . . no trace of unnaturalness of any kind. Distortion of all sorts 
is conspicuous by its absence; every instrument comes through 
tnie-to-timbre; there is no edge to the sound in any part of the range; 
and the surface of my pressings were almost supernaturally silent." 

George Jcllinek. HI-FI STEREO REVIEW 

"Technically, this production (Madama Butterfly) is near perfection. The 
sound is warmly alive without being overly resonant, balances are exemplary." 

Herbert Kupferberg. NEW YORK HERALD TRIBUNE (broadcast on WQXR) 
". . . Instruments and voices are clear, bright and true to life and— 
perhaps most impressive of all— there is no distortion when the stylus reaches 
the inside grooves closest to the label." 



John Wilson. NEW YORK TIMES (broadcast on WQXR) 
"As a rule, turning down the volume tends to muffle reproduction. 
But in this case (the Hugo and Luigi Chorus), fullness and clarity remain 
even at very low volume— which is the way to listen to this album." 



THE PROOF IS IN THE LISTENING... HEAR IT! COMPARE IT! 

DYNAGROOVE 
THE NEW SOUND BY RCA VICTOR 



20 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 




SINGLES REVIEW POLICY 
'TV""!' ""' '' •'■ ll >°»'" '•' "view •• "Mrd b, lillboard't leview Panel 
«i its >elei Bolrn.ul .irate* w.thm its ,.!„.„ „f „„, it , ,„„,, „, ,' 
the outstanding i.n,l„ ol the „,rk in published. .ncl u <l,n, ,11 r ,,,i,j„, , 
5S" UfW" « « at least or. side. Hius Iccuim, attention pn 

W, ■"!■*. Oreatest sales potential Full mlm are presented ft. 
Spoil. ,M p.rl, o. Spei.al Mer.l Picki, in i omlUr ,„,|„ „, nn.j withill 
tlie.r respective categories Flip side* pre rated separately 



4$ 



POP SPOTLIGHT 

BOBBY VEE 

CHARMS 



Aldon, BMi: (2:13)-Libeny 55530 

Bobby Vee should keep right an lop ol the 
charts with this cute piece of material 
which he sells in his own lively fashion, 
aided by solid support from chorus and 
ork. Flip is "Bobby Tomorrow" (Roosevelt 
BMI) (1:40). 



POP SPOTLIGHT 



THE MIRACLES 



A LOVE SHE CAN 
COUNT ON 

(Jobete. BMI) (2:39) 

I CAN TAKE A HINT 

(Jobote. BMI) (2 ; 25)-Tam|j 54078 

The Miracles, just coming off their hit 
"You Really Got a Hold on Me," follow up 
with two solid sides, either or both of 
which can be winners. Topper is a listen- 
able rocker in the same groove as their 
hit, sparked by a fine lead job. Side N is 
a bright novelty handled with spirit by 
the group. 



POP SPOTLIGHT 

EDDIE HODGES 

WOULD YOU COME 



BACK 



(Metric, BMI) 0 :5S)-Columbie 42697 

This is a singularly fine side for young 
Hodges. It's in a weeper vein with a most 
impelling drum figure and use of chorus. 
The kids coutd go for this one. Flip is "Too 
Soon lo Know" (Mr. Blue, BMI) (2:07). 



POP SPOTLIGHT 



THE VENTURES 

SKIP TO M' LIMBO 

Dodo. BMI) 7 05: Dollar. M 

Here's another top-flight side in the limbo 
groove. This one is an instrumental which 
should rack up more sustained selling power 
for group. Flip is "El Cumbanchero" (Peer 
litf'l, BMI) (1:46). 



POP SPOTLIGHT 



LITTLE ESTHER PHILLIPS- 
BIG AL DOWNING 

IF YOU WANT IT 
I'VE GOT IT 

(Golden West Melodies, BMI) (2:47)- 
lenoi 5565 

In a rocker that brings back memories of 
Brook and Dinah, Little Esther and Big A1 
team up to sell the world that they dig 
each other on this happy, swinging side. 
R.&b. and pop action is almost assured. 
Flip is "You Never Miss Your Water (Till 
the Well Runs Dry" (Hill & Range, BMI) 
(2:16). 



POP SPOTLIGHT 



r 



THE ROUTERS 

STING RAY 

(Wrist-House of Joseph, BMI) (1:57)- 
Warner Bros. 5349 

Here's Ihc second disking of this novelty 
rocker that has the excitement and the 
instrumental sound to get Top 40 plays and 
action. The Routers should come back with 
a strong one after their "Let's Go" hit. 
Flip side is "Snap Happy" (Wrist-Marathon, 
BMI) (2:17). 



POP SPOTLIGHT 



THE PREMEERS 

DIARY OF OUR LOVE 



(Slider, 



«l) (2:33)-Her»ld 577 



A number of stations have already taken to 
programming this one. It's a most powerful 
teen side in the tight unison singing group 
style. The rockabeltad tells a story to 
which most teens can relate. The flip is 
"Gee Oh Gee" (Jot, BMI) (2:45). 



POP SPOTLIGHT 



HERBIE HANCOCK 

WATERMELON MAN 

(Aries, BMI) (2:43)-Blue Note 1862 

There's another version of this tune getting 
some action on another label, but this fine, 
jazx-orienfed styling, somewhat in the Can- 
nonball Adderley tradition, can also get its 
share of action. Strong beat and sound 
makes a solid effort with pep and jazi 
appeal. Flip is "Three Bags Full" (Aries 
—If) (5:30). 



POP SPOTLIGHT 



THE FLEETWOODS 

SURE IS LONESOME 
DOWNTOWN 

(Cedarwood, BMI) (2:37) 

YOU SHOULD HAVE 
BEEN THERE 

(Melrit, BMI I (I.SSr-Dollop 74 

Two fine sides by the Fleetwoods the) 
should do mighty well with their teen fpni. 
Top side it en attractive weeper with a 
men.,.; flip Is a light, swingy ditty sold 
with style by the group. 



POP SPOTLIGHT 



THE RONETTES 

MEMORY 

(Oreyer, ASCAP) (2:14}-May 138 

This three-girl group has been known in 
the past for the fine twist act it puts on. 
How the gab have a disk winner, too, 
with a bright teen item with a forceful 
lead and solid help from the others. 6ood 
recitation spot, too. Watch it. Flip is 
"Good Girls" (Irod, BMI) (2:32). 



POP SPOTLIGHT 



THE PLAYMATES 

"A" MY NAME IS 
ALICE 

(Vanno, ASCAP) (2:08)- 
ABC-Paramotint 10422 

The group could easily have a winner with 
this clever novelty-styled side. It's strictly 
on Ihc teen kick and it builds nicely. Lots 
of gimmicks can help make it go. Flip is 
"Just a Little Bit" (Vanno, ASCAP) (2:23). 



POP OLDIE SPOTLIGHT 



PATSY CLINE 

WALKING AFTER 
MIDNIGHT 

(Four Star, BMI) (2: 25)- Everest 2020 

The late Patsy Cline had this hit originally 
on Decca some five years back. Although 
the backing is thin by present standards, 
the voice is still fine and the side can 
lake on a collector's item impact in view 
of the singer's tragic death last week. Flip 
is "That Wonderful Someone" (Four Star 
BMI) (2:23). 



C.4W. SPOTLIGHT 



COWBOY COPAS 

GOODBYE KISSES 

(Starday, BMI) (2:12) 

THE GYPSY GIRL 

(Starday, BMI) (2:42)-Stardey 62! 

Cowboy Copas is gone now, but his memory 
will linger on with his many fans and 
they'll grab this one up fast. Top side is a 
plaintive weeper while the flip is a saga 
tune with a fast walti beat. Both are fine 
and should score. 



SPIRITUAL SPOTLIGHT 



MARION WILLIAMS AND 
THE STARS OF FAITH 

GOD AND ME 

(Conrad. BMI) ;? 36: 

HALLELUJAH 

(Conrad, BMI) (2:15) Vee Jay 920 

A disking of outstanding interest and qual- 
ity. First up is a fascinating blend of styles 
incorporating an expression of faith in a 
calypso setting, Flip Is the concluding 
anthem from Handel's "Messiah," done in 
wild, upbeat, shouting style. A great 
coupling. 



FOUR STAR SINGLES 

The foucstar rating is awarded new 
singles with sufficient commercial po- 
tential in their respective categories to 
mtrit being stocked by dealer, one- 
stops and rack jobbers handling that 
category. 



POPULAR 



JIMMY UCAN 

**** This ol, House (Hamblen. 
HMD 12:16) — ..,« Mile Long 
Train (Coach and pour, KMII (2:471 
Columnar 427.18 

JIMMY JONES 

**** Mr. Fis-li I Premier. BMI) 
12:20)—**** No Insurance (Pre- 
■tier. BMI) (2:10). VBJJ JAY 505 

RICHARD IPOPCOHN) null 

**** Brand New Man lAldon. 
BMI) 12:25)—**** So Much Love 
in My Heart (Popmore. RMII (2:10) 
EPIC 9575 

MIKE CLIFFORD 

**** On* Km. Too I ate (Trio. 
BMI) (2:481—**** Danny's Dream 
(Ouartel. ASCAP) 11:2*1. UNITED 
ARTISTS 588 

JOE HAHNKLL AND HIS ORK 

**** The Walking Sonjt iCnaame 
CI, Cncama Cal (Leeds, ASCAP) 
(2:261 — **** D„ ne (Miller, 
ASCAP) 12:12). KAPP 521 

JOAN IE SUMMERS 

**** Henny Penny (Premier, BMI) 
**** A Llllle Bll .if Everything 
m*»i BMII (2:22). WARNER BROS. 

ARTHUR ALEXANDER 

**** Dream Girl (Sure-Flrr. BMI) 
12:301 — **** 1 Wonder Where 
You Are Tonlgbl IRed River Sunn. 
BMI) 12:35). DOT 16454 

BILL CUNNINGHAM 

**** I Walk a Llllle Faster IMor- 
rts. ASCAPI (2:001 _ **** You 
Fascinate Me So (Morris. ASCAPI 
12:161. AYA 119 

THE CASUALS 
**** Money (That's All I Want) 
IJobele. BMII (2:03) — **** Bar 
Hammer (John's Other- Henry) (Cho- 
Fin. BMI) (2:051. MINARET 109 

THE SPRINGFIELDS 

**** Island nf Dreams MRC 

BMII I2J5>_**** Fo.,, Moun . 

tain Top IPeer Inl'l. BMI) (2:25). 
PHILLIPS 40099. 

BOBBY GREGG 

**** Walk On (Cherry Hill, BMI) 
(2:30)—**** TV. Drummer Man 
(Roosevelt. BMII (2:30). EPIC 9579 

JUDY GARLAND 
**** I Could Go on Singing 
(United Artists, ASCAPI (3:07)— 
**** Hello Bluebird IRemlck 
ASCAPI 13:01). CAPITOL 493» 

TOMMY ROE 
**** Count on Me (Leeds. 
ASCAP) (2:01 )—**** The Folk 
Singer IPalnled Desert. BMII (2:511. 
ABC-PARAMOUNT 10423 

BABS TINO 

**** If Only for Tonfjthl (Trio, 
BMI) (2:10)—**** My First lose 
lOuartel. ASCAPI (2:371. APP 517 

CHAD MITCHELL TRIO 

**** Green Grow the Lilac 
ITeena. ASCAPI 12:301 — **** 
Leave Me If You Want lo ITeena. 
ASCAP) 12:361. KAPP 511 

BILLY MURK ANT) THE 7 KARATS 
**** Slrlnit of Guitars (Heather, 
field. BMII 11:58 — **** Dia- 
monds IRobbins. ASCAPI (2:15). RIV- 
ERSIDE 47 

TOMMY EDWARDS 
**** Sometimes Yuu win Some- 
llmes Yon Lose (Eden. BMII (2:30)— 
**** May I (Eden. BMII 12:10). 
MGM 13121 

NT AN WORTH 

**** Roman Holiday ll.unsd.iwne- 
Winslon. ASCAPI 12:19)— *** The 
Wiggle Wobble Walkers ll.ansdowne- 
Winsloo. ASCAPI (2:191. ENITH 719 

PAT CORDEI.I AND THE 

CRESCENTS 

**** Durllnp Come Rack (Club 
Royal. BMII (2:171—*** My lean 
(Club Royal. BMI) 12:331. VICTORY 
1001 

I EROY III. I Ml s AND ORK 

**** The Rnllrighier (Southern. 
ASCAPI (2:05) - *** Tn. Breee 
and I (Marks. ASCAPI (2:221. 
UNITED ARTISTS 515 

BURL IVES 

**** Baby Come Home lo Me 
li'an.pcr. RMII 12:121 — *** Roses 
and Orchids iRrrnncr. RMII (3:45). 
DECCA .11479 

IFS RWIFH'S RAI.I.ADEERS 

**** How (he Wcsl Was Won 
IRobbins. ASCAPI 11:4m 

I ES BAXTER VM> HIS ORK 

*** Ihemc From "Lawrence of 
Arabia" tC alia j. RMh |2:30l. RF- 
PRISE 20159 



LOVELACE W ATKINS 

**** Tender I (Leeds, 
ASCAPI (2:10)—*** Ma Cherie Au 
Revner IPremier. BMI) (2j32). 
GROOVE 0016 

THE RUMRLERS 

**** Boas Strikes Back (Downey. 
BMII 12:12)—*** Sorry iFor the 
Way I Treated Youl (Downey. BMII 
(2:11). DOT 16455 

ELMER BERNSTEIN 

**** To Kill a Mockingbird 
(Northern, ASCAP) (2:01) — *** 
Teraslna (Columbia Pictures:. ASCAPI 
(1:521. AVA 120 

JERRY McGHEE 

**** On the Rebound iCigtna. 
BMI) 12:20) — *** Unknown Soldier 
(South Mountain. BMII (2:35). RE- 
PRISE 20156 

DODIE STEVENS 

**** Hello Stranger {Travis, BMI) 
— *** For a Llllle While IPoM. 
ASCAPI (2:351. IMPERIAL 5930 

TINO 

**** Wedding Bells Will Hint 
(Symbol. BMII 12:15) — *** Heidi 
(Symbol. BMI) I2:.-05I. RIP 4000 

GUITARS, INC. 

**** Holiday Love (Duadee, 
BMI) (2:131—*** Little Toy (Dun- 
dee, BMII (2:15). HAMILTON 50035 

IKE QUEBEC 
**** Liebestraum (Groove, BMI) 
(3:42) — *** Shu Shu IRobbins) 
(3:30). BLUE NOTE 1175 

BILL JUSTIS 
**** I'm Gonna Learn to Dance 
ITunesllk, BMI) <2ri3l — *** Ta- 
mnore (Hay Market. BMII (2:19). 
SMASH 1812 

JIMMY PARIS 

**** One Hand. One Heart 
IShtrmer, ASCAP) 12:19) — *** 
You're Just Another Pretty Face 
lAldon, BMI) (2:20). CAPITOL 947 

TOMMY CRIDEK 

**** Depending: on You (Tucka- 
hoe, BMI) 12:36) — *** Sandy 
(Tuckahoc. BMII (2:18). TOKEN 1001 

SIMS TWINS 

**** That Where It's At (Kags. 
BMI) (2:081 — *** Movta' and a 
Groovhr (Kags. BMI) (2:35). SAR 113 

JIMMY PARIS 

**** Esmeralda (Sherlyn, BMI) 
(2:11)—** Lost Love (Shgrtyu, BMI) 
11:55). KC 113 



COUNTRY 

JUSTIN I run 

**** Take a Letter. Miss Cray 
ITree. BMI) (2:11)—**** H ere I 
Sll A-Waltln' ITree. BMII 12:35). 
GROOVE 0017 

HYLO BROWN 

**** Seasons of My Heart (Star- 
day. BMII |2:I0)—**** Daddy's 
Place (Bayou Stale. BMI) (2:17). 
STARDAY 622 

BILLY WESTERN 

**** Say When (You Want Me 
lo Leave) (Glad. BMI)—**** My 
Blue Room (Glad, BMII. D 1245 

ARTHUR THOMAS 

**** Hey Mabel (Let Me Have 

Another) (TomcaL BMI) (2:04) 

*** Live F'ast, Love Hard, Die 
Young (Central Songs, BMI) (1:53). 
RAVEN 1105 

LOUVIN BROTHERS 

**** Love Tamed lo Hale IMosa 
Ross. BMII 12:461 - *** | Cried 
After You Left ITree. BMII 12:141. 
(SIM 1(11 4941 

BF.VER1.Y BUFF 

**** Forgive Me ll.ois - Howl. 
BMI) (2:43)—*** No Part Tlrar 
Lnvc (Lois-Howl. RMII (2:001. BETH- 
I.EHEM 3065 

BILL PHILLIPS 

**** Let's Walk Away Strangers 

(Cedarwood. BMII (2:10) *** 

Lying lo Be Together (Cedarwood. 
BMII 12:171. DECCA 31480 

DEL REEVES 

**** The Only Ciri I CanT For- 
gel (Yonah. BMI) 12:40) — *** The 
Love She Offered Me (Yonah. BMI) 
12:001. REPRISE 20151 

JEAN PRUETT 

**** Just a Little Alter Heart- 
aches (Glaser. RMII (2:15) — *** 
Anolhcr Heart to Break iGlascr. mil 
12:071. RCA VICTOR 1157 



JAZZ 



JOE PASS 

***dr Forward Pais (We**, Coast, 
ASCAP) (2:45, — * ww * p.*, „, 
Wlo* and Hoses IR.txvu Nova) (Wh- 
mark, ASCAP) (2:*8i. PACIFIC JA77. 

3d 

I.OH DONALDSON 

**** Funky Mama (Part* I .\ III 
n.r.i.iM, BMI). Ill I ( NOTE 1868 

CRRALD WILSON AND HIS OKk 

**** MUrstonn (Sa*o>. RMIi 

12:62) — *** Tcri (Ataa**, BMIl 
(2:52). PACIFIC JAZZ 365 

(C'ontinut'd tut fia^e 22) 



THE CHALLENGE 



THE SOUND 
ON THIS NEW RCA VICTOR RECORD 
CHALLENGES COMPARISON WITH THE SOUND 
ON ANY OTHER RECORD AVAILABLE 
ON ANY LABEL ANYWHERE 



DYNAEHOOVE 




WHAT THE DEALERS SAY 



Frank Corsaro, LECHMERE SALES, Cambridge, Mass. 
"Before any promotion broke . . . customers came in asking for RCA Victor 
Dynagroove Records. After they bought one, they came back for others." 
"I expect . . . Dynagroove records will revolutionize the record business. 
It's the standard for other companies to try to beat." 

Lela Stenzcl, GIMBEL'S-SCHUSTER'S, Milwaukee, Wis. 
"Finest musical detail ever heard on record— highs and lows are 
never lost— complete definition of every instrument." 

Sam Goody, SAM GOODY, New York, N. Y. 
"I have listened to your new Dynagroove L.P.'s. The retail industry has been 
looking forward to such an advance. It spells additional dollars." 

Maurine and Dick Moore, P.M. RECORD CENTERS, Davenport & Cedar Rapids, Iowa 

"A dramatic improvement, resulting in true-to-life recorded sound." 



Henry Lishon, LISBON'S, INC., Chicago and Evanston. 111.; Inglewood. Cal. 
"Dynagroove sound is so different that ... the ordinary layman can 
now distinguish low register clarinets, cellos and basses and 
know what true sound is actually like." 

George Jacques. MUSIC BOX, San Francisco. Calif. 
"Fantastic clarity and presence— Dynagroove will prove a 
real shot in the arm to the record industry." 

Merrill Rose, ROSE RADIO St RECORDS, Chicago. III. 
"Response has been terrific— people are coming in and asking about 
Dynagroove records— customer reaction wonderful— sales very good." 

Mill Harris, MUSIC LAND, Hollywood, Calif. 
"99% of our customers agree, this is the 
very best sound on records." 



IDE PROOF IS IN TIE IISTENING... HEAR IT! COMPARE HI 

HYNACBOOVE 
THE NEW SOUND BY RCA VICTOR 



22 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 



Pub Says Hits Are Fruit 
Of Lots of Spade Work 



• SINGLES REVIEWS 



NEW YORK — The seeds that 
publisher Howie Richmond 
planted over the last few years 
have started to bear fruit. And 
nice fruit it is, such as the 
scores to two smash Broadway 
hits "Stop the World, I Want to 
Get Off" and "Oliver!" the hot- 
test of the bossa nova tunes, 
"Desafinado," and the revival of 
the Bart Howard oldie "In Other 
Words," which, under the new 
title "Fly Me to the Moon" has 
turned into one of the year's 
big hits. 

In addition to all of this, the 
current folk or pop-folk wave 
has given Richmond and Al 
Brackman's publishing firms a 
big push, for Richmond's Folk- 
ways Music has always had a 
deep supply of folk. "Wimo- 
weh," "If I Had a Hammer," 
"Cottonfields" and "Tom Doo- 
ley," for example, are all Rich- 
mond copyrights. Recently law- 
suits over "Tom Dooley" and 
"Cottonfields" were settled to 
Richmond's satisfaction, which 
meant that both tunes were ac- 
cepted as theirs. 

Richmond noted that the suc- 
cess of his various firms (Lud- 
low, Hollis, Folkways, Ellis) 
did not come overnight. 
Long Haul 

"I went down to Brazil three 
years ago and brought back 
bossa nova material," said Rich- 
mond, "and we've been acquir- 
ing folk songs for the past 10 
years. As for 'Stop the World,' 
Tony Newley and Leslie Bricusse 
worked out the original idea for 
the show in my office here al- 
most two years ago." 

Richmond also pointed out 
that he had to lay out $20,000 
to get the rights to the score 
of Lionel Bart's "Oliver!" "There 
was concern on the part of some 
publishers as to whether the 
show would go in the U. S. due 
to the character of Fagin and 
the way it was played in Eng- 

Dave Pell Signs 
As Liberty Indie 

HOLLYWOOD — Dave Pell 
last week signed as an inde- 
pendent producer for Liberty 
Records. Pell, a noted musician 
in his own right, had headed 
a.&r. production activities for 
Precision Radiation Instruments 
(Tops Records) for several years 
prior to entering the indie rec- 
ord production field. 



releases is not unlike that of a 
popular deejay who wants to get 
on a record first, provided it is 
up to his musical standards. His 
listeners have come to expect 
something "new" through the 
night. He enjoys tying in a salute 
to a currently newsworthy musi- 
cal personality and when he pro- 
grams a contemporary composi- 
tion it is so unobtrusively intro- 
duced that the listener goes 
along with him. 

Sound Alikes 

American Airlines has gone 
out of its way to get "sound- 
alikes" for New York announcer 
Bob Hall, whose intimate soft- 
sell manner creates a friendly at- 
mosphere which enables Clardy 
to program a Kodaly sonata for 
unaccompanied 'cello next to a 

"new release on label" 

of Schubert's "Unfinished." 

Clardy cited an interesting 
listener response to a recent CBS 
house ad which announced that 
one could hear Beethoven's 



land. We were too, but luckily 
the role was tempered for the 
U. S. and the show is a hit." 

Richmond noted that his firm 
was working to get records on 
the tunes from "Oliver!" three 
months before the show opened 
in New York. "It's true, the 
show opened in San Francisco 
13 weeks before it opened in 
New York so we had a lot of 
time to work. But we did the 
same thing with "Stop the 
World," working to get single 
records 13 weeks before the 
show reached New York. We 
wanted to have records on the 
charts when the show hit town. 
We did it with 'What Kind of 
Fool Am I' From 'Stop the 
World'." 

Not Stopping 

Neither Richmond nor his ex- 
ecutive vice-president Brackman 
are resting on their laurels, 
whether they be pop. Broadway 
musicals, folk or Brazilian mu- 
sic. They have a new South 
American song called "Jazz Sam- 
ba" they will soon be working 
on. 

As for shows, Cyril Ornadel 
and Leslie Bricusse are working 
on a new show called "Pick- 
wick" based on Dicken's "Pick- 
wick Papers" which Richmond 
will co-publish with Chappell. 
There is a possibility that Lionel 
Bart will complete his version 
of "Quasimodo" for presentation 
next fall. Richmond is Bart's 
publisher in the U. S. There is a 
new show getting ready in Lon- 
don penned by Johnny Worth 
called "Berlin" which Richmond 
has first dibs on. And Richmond 
has just formed a music pub- 
lishing firm with movie pro- 
ducer Samuel Bronston, called 
Samuel Bronston Music, which 
will publish the score of Bron- 
ston's new flick, "55 Days at 
Peking." 

As if that isn't enough, Rich- 
mond has much original material 
by Woody Guthrie (whose "This 
Land Is My Land" is fast becom- 
ing a standard in the folk field), 
and 10 new Bart Howard tunes 
to show around this spring. 

Richmond and Brackman are 
also stepping up production on 
the firm's song books, which 
have provided a steady source 
of income for the music firm. 

Their book called "Folk Sing" 
sells about 50,000 copies a year, 
and now they have added or 
are adding "Folk Songs for 
Fun," "Calypso Folk Sing" and 
the "Woody Guthrie Songbook." 



Fifth Symphony on an afternoon 
broadcast, and one of the selec- 
tions to be offered on "Music 
Till Dawn" would be a seldom- 
heard work by Hummel. The 
listener presented Clardy with a 
sort of back-handed compliment 
when he questioned the integ- 
rity of programming "another 
Beethoven 5th" in "prime time" 
and saving the "rare" for "all 
the night watchmen in town." 

The past 15 years have wit- 
nessed probably the greatest 
musical saturation, classical even 
more than popular, in history. 
The average listener today will 
probably hear more classical 
music in one year than the musi- 
cian of the past heard in his 
entire lifetime. With the "pres- 
tige" oriented factory-sealed 
product and the increasing ab- 
sence of listening booths in rec- 
ord stores, the question of how 
the classical buyer can best be 
exposed to product seems to re- 
fine itself down to more and bet- 
ter radio exposure. 



iiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiinilili 

ARMADA PLANS 
PARLEY SHIFT 
TO MIAMI 

NEW YORK — The annual 
convention of the American Rec- 
ord Merchants and Distributors 
Association will not be held in 
July at the Edgewater Beach 
Hotel, Chicago, as previously 
announced. Present thinking 
leans in the direction of Miami 
Beach for either the third or 
fourth week of June. It is also 
seen as a possibility that an 
ARMADA board meeting may 
be held even sooner in light of 
new developments affecting dis- 
tributors last week. (See Han- 
dleman story.) 

lllllll!llll!lll<lll!l!llllllllllllllnilllll!llllllll!UII!llll!inil!IIUIIIIIIllllll 

Barry Kittleson 
Joins Editorial; 
Niki to Sponsor 

NEW YORK— Barry Kittleson 
has joined the editorial depart- 
ment of Billboard as editorial 
assistant. He replaces Niki Ka- 
lish, who resigned to join the 
staff of Sponsor magazine. 

Kittleson most recently served 
as assistant to Tom Noonan, 
Billboard's director of market 
research. He is a music graduate 
of U.C.L.A. 



Dorati conducts his own com- 
position. Symphony — 1957 cou- 
pled with his Nocturne and 
Capriccio for Oboe and String 
Quartette. 

Another item of interest is 
Dorati's April release of Bartok's 
complete opera "Bluebird's Cas- 
tle." Some 20 years ago. Dorati, 
who was a close personal friend 
of Bartok, conducted the Ameri- 
can premiere of this opera in a 
coast-to-coast broadcast from 
Dallas. On the current record- 
ing, the opera will be sung in the 
original Hungarian. 

Following is a list of albums 
furnished by Mercury which 
represent some of the best sell- 
ing disks to date under the 
direction of Maestro Dorati. 
Tchaikovsky: 1812 Overture — 

MG 50054 (M); SR 90054 

(S) 

Beethoven: Wellington's Victory 
—LPS 5000 (M); LPS 9000 
(S) 

Copland: Appalachian Spring; 

Billy the Kid— MG 50246 

(Ml: SR 90246 (S) 
Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsodies 

Nos. 2 — 3; Enesco: 

Roumanian Rhapsodies Nos. 

1 & 2— MG 50235 (M); SR 

90235 (S) 

Just Call This a 
Real Loaded Idea 

SAN FRANCISCO— A novel 
record promotion originated by 
Bob Earl, San Francisco branch 
manager for King Records, has 
been picked up by the national 
record distributor and will be 
repeated in Cincinnati, Chicago 
and New York. 

Bethlehem's new recording of 
"Seagram," sung by the Vice- 
roys, prompted Earl to include a 
half pint of Seagram's VO 
whiskey and a package of Vice- 
roy cigarcts when delivery the 
disk, all wrapped up in gay 
"Mardi Gras" gift paper. Uni- 
formed messenger delivery per- 
sonnel called upon local deejays 
in the four top r.&b. and rock 
and roll stations in San Fran- 
cisco and Oakland — KSAN, 
KEWB, KDIA and KYA. 



• Continued from page 20 



SPIRITUAL 

BERTHA ROBINSON 

** ** He Will Fight Your Battles 
IBooles) 12:551 — **** Well. 
Well, Well (Martln-Morrlsl (1:531. 
PEACOCK 116} 

REV. JULIUS CHEEKS 
**** Turn Your Radio On (LION. 
BMII (2:20)— **** Last Mile of 
the Way (Lion. BMII 13:01). 
PEACOCK 1875 

REV. CLEOPHUS ROBINSON 

***** Just Over the Hill (Hill s 
Ranee. BMI) (2:24) — **** Ever- 
lasting Life (Don. BMII 12:29). 
PEACOCK lS7o 

PATTERSON SINGERS 
**** I've Got to Make It to the 
Promised Land (Conrad, BMII (2:501— 
**** He'B Carry You Through 
(Conrad. BMI) 11:50). VEE JAZZ 91» 

CHARLES TAYLOR 
**** Jesus I'll Never Forget (Con- 
rad, BMI) (2:11)—**** As You 
Sow So Shall You Reap (Conrad. 
BMI) (2:43). VEE JAY 917 

HARMONIZING FOUR 

**-** Halleluiah (Conrad, BMI) 
(2:5S>— **** Rock of Ages. (Con- 
rad. BMII 13:221. VEE JAY 922 



Sealair Writes for Joy 

NEW YORK— Ronny Sealair, 
an artist with Reprise records 
has been signed to an exclusive 
contract by Joy Music as writer 
for the publishing firm. 



Liszt: Les Preludes, etc. — MG 
50214 (M); SR 90214 (S) 

Khachaturian: Gayne Ballet 
Suite No. 1; Tchaikovsky: 
Romeo and Juliet — MG 
50209 (M); SR 90209 

Rimsky-Korsakov: Schehera- 
zade, Op. 35— MG 50009 
(M); SR 90195 (S) 

Stravinsky: Firebird (complete 
ballet)— MG 50226 (M); SR 
90255 (S) 

Tchaikovsky: Nutcracker (com- 
plete ballet)— OL 2-113 (M); 
SR 2-9013 (S) 

Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5 
— MG 50255 (M); SR 
90255 (S) 

ROSA Maps Plan 
For 1st Parley 

CHICAGO — Plans for the 
first annual convention of the 
Record One - Stop Association 
(ROSA), the passage of various 
resolutions and an address by 
MOA executive director Bob 
Blundred, were highlights of a 
midwinter meeting of the one 
stop group here. 

Importance of the one-stop in 
the disk marketing scene was 
noted, during the meeting, by a 
reference to the fact that such 
labels as Liberty and London 
have established one-stop de- 
partments in their organizations. 

Resolutions were passed call- 
ing for the elimination of trans- 
shipping by distributors and a 
100 per cent guaranteed return 
policy on all singles with all 
manufacturers. Membership has 
voted for a monthly distribution 
of a ROSA record hits list. 

In his speech, MOA's Blun- 
dred called for greater co-opera- 
tion between the two groups for 
the betterment and continued 
expansion of both elements of 
the business. Present from man- 
ufacturer ranks were Harry 
Chipetz, Cameo-Parkway; Bob 
Keels, Capitol; Bob Krueger, 
RCA Victor; Ray Lawrence, 
Colpix; Bob Fead, Liberty; Mur- 
ray Singer, Laurie; Sy Warner, 
London, and Bud Katzel, Rou- 
lette. 



THE CARAVANS 

**** To Whom Shall I Turn 

(Conrad. BMI) (2:32) — **** Seek 
Ye the Lord (Conrad, BMI) (3tl4). 
VEE JAY 921 

ALEX BRADFORD 
**** One Step (Conrad. BMI) 
(2:57)—**-** Just a> Time (Con- 
rad. BMI) <2:1». VEE JAY 919 

SACRED 

WILMA LEE AND STONEY COOPER 
**** Satisfied (Aasff-Roae, BMI) 
(2:12) — **** Glorv Land March 
(Peer Intl. BMI) 11:581. HICKORY 

UN 

Liberty Move 
To Get a Party 

HOLLYWOOD — Liberty 
Records will launch its second 
company-owned branch — its 
newly opened distribution facili- 
ties in New York City — with a 
cocktail party for the record in- 
dustry at Toots Shor's on March 
26. The label's first company- 
owned branch was opened last 
year in Chicago. 

Liberty's national sales man- 
ager, Don Bohanan, has named 
Bernard Block as New York 
branch manager, with Block in 
turn appointing his own staff: 
Dan Fortunato, covering Man- 
hattan and Westchester; Sal 
Utrano, Long Island and 
Queens, and Frank Bisbano, 
Brooklyn. 

Liberty's national promotion 
director Bob Skaff elevated his 
Los Angeles promotion rep. 
Tommy Li Puma, to head the 
new branch's promotion activi- 
ties, basing his operation in 
Gotham. 

Motown Launches 
New Jazz Series 

DETROIT— As part of its in- 
creased concentration on album 
product, Tamla-Motown has is- 
sued its first jazz disks. The 
label is calling the albums the 
Workshop Jazz Series. 

Artists issued in the initial re- 
lease on Workshop are Earl 
Washington, with members of 
the Count Basie band, singer 
Paula Grce, pianist Johnny Grif- 
fith and a bossa nova set by 
the George Bohanon Quartet. 

In addition to the new jazz 
product, the labels are issuing 
album material by some of their 
hot singles acts, including Mary 
Wells and Marvin Gaye. 

To back up this new product, 
Phil Jones, album sales chief, 
and Al Klein, Southwestern 
district sales manager, covered 
those territories, especially the 
NARM convention in San Fran- 
cisco. 

Capitol Signs 
Sonny James 

NASHVILLE — Capitol Rec- 
ords announced this week the 
acquisition of Sonny James, who 
plans to cut his first session with 
the label under the new con- 
tract in "a matter of days." 

Capitol a.&r. chief Ken Nel- 
son said the signing of James 
is another step in "continuing 
a policy of adding hot talent 
to the Capitol roster." 

For James, it will be coming 
home to the label on which he 
had his biggest hits, including 
"First Date, First Kiss." 'Till the 
Leaf Shall Fall" and the big 
seller, "Young Love." 



Cracking Radio With Classical LP's 

• Continued from page 18 



Gold Records Come Dorati's Way 

• Continued from page 18 



Co 




SOUND ENGINEERING 

(Only experts with many years' experience in sound \ 
are at the controls. I 




MOLD CORRECTION 

;illed hands remove tiny flaws, then on for audi* 
inspection. 




k~4 



MATERIAL SELECTION 

of vinyl, exclu- \ 
top quality! I 



(Research has developed 4 grades 
sive with RCA Custom-each is top 




LACQUER INSPECTION 

(Inspection, inspection, inspection-starts with the\ 
master lacquer and never stops! I 



MOLD INSPECTION 

Before metal stamper is made, mold is scrutinized 
minutely for flaws, 




AUDIO INSPECTION 

(In air conditioned, soundproof rooms, the mold is \ 
finally checked. Only perfection passes. I 



MICROSCOPIC ACCURACY 

(The stamper is microscopically centered, then \ 
punched to fit record press exactly. } 




PACKAGING INSPECTION 

Last inspection: as record goes in sleeve. Spot" 
audio checks are constantly made also. 



YOUR RECORD 

(We stake our reputation on the quality of every \ 
record we produce. J 

"Quality" is not just a word at RCA Custom, it's a way of 
recording, manufacturing and packaging to give you 
the best of everything in recorded sound. Try us and see! 



RCA CUSTOM RECORD SALES... THE MOST TRUSTED NAME IN SOUND AND SERVICE 

155 but 24th St., New York 10, N. Y., MU 9-7200 ■ 445 N. Lake Short Dr., Chicago 11, III., WH 4-3215 ■ 800 17th Ave. S., Nashville 3, Taim., Al 5-5701 ■ 1510 N. Vine St, Hollywood 2B, Cal., 01 4-1660 




Billboard 




or too 



.jjtW STAR NVMMMMlHi register- 

■ -a* greatest upwi'd progress 1h*» *te» 



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OUR DAY WILL COME 7 

Raby and Ike RoumIIm Kapp SOI 

THE EHD OF THE WORLD A 9 

Sheerer Dark, RCA Vkloe M9I 

YOU'RE THE REASON I'M MVINS 10 

Bobby Daria, Capitol 41*7 

HE'S SO FINE 5 

CMTfMM. I ah- lr J153 

WALK IKE 4 MAN 9 

Four Setuoat, Ve* Jay 415 

RHYTHM OF THE RAIN 11 

("■ir.d.i. Vitt.nl t«26 

SOUTH STREET 6 

OrtoM*. Cmn 34) 

BLAME IT OH THE B0SSA H0VA A 10 

F.ydl* GoraM, Columbia 41641 

WHA! Will MY MARY SAY A 9 

JolntaT Maihb. Coruaablo 41oto 

IN DREAMS 7 

ONE BROKEN HEART FOR SALE A 6 

Elcte PrwlE*. RCA Victor 1134 

RUBY BABY A 10 

Dloa. Cahunbat 41441 

OUR WHITER LOVE A 8 

■lit Purwll, Cobmblu 41*19 

HEY PAULA 13 

PhI * Prate. PhlUpi 44M4 

WILD WEEKEND 13 

RtOclt. Swno 41Z5 

I WAHNA BE AROUND A 11 

TtMf InmII, Clin mi la 43414 

All I HAVE TO DO IS DREAM 7 

H 'if ratanai rtj w.. MCM 13111 

MAMA DIDN'T LIE 12 

Ju Bradkr. Ckcsc IMS 

ALICE IN WONDERLAND A 8 

NcU Sodoku. RCA Victor 1117 

LETS TURKEY TROT 8 

Lllll* Esa, DiBM-atkm 10*4 

LET S LIMBO SOME MORE 6 

Chubby Checker, Parkway 1*1 

WALK RIGHT IN 12 

Rooftop Miner,. Vaafitarsl 35017 

LAUGHING BOY 5 

Mary **ell». Motown l*J4 

DON'T SET ME FREE 5 

Ray Chariet. ARC Pinimnl 1*4*< 

BABY WORKOUT 3 

J. ... WRwa. Rrwuwkk 5513* 

DO THE BIRD 4 

Dae l*te kbar*. Cena** 144 

BUTTERFLY BABY 7 

Bobby RydeJL Caawo 142 

TWENTY MILES 5 

< '. .u-. l.: Parkway 041 

GREENBACK DOLLAR 9 

K .mutton Trio. Capitol 4 Mi 

BOSS GUITAR A 7 

Dun. Eddr. RCA Victor 1131 

CAN'T GET USED TO LOSING YOU A 4 

In*,, WTUiaan. < Mb . 41474 

FOLLOW THE BOYS 4 

Coonle Fraach. MCM 1JI17 

DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES A 9 

Henry Mandal. RCA Vklar 1120 

DON'T SAY NOTHIN' BAD ABOUT 
MY BABY 4 

Cooklrv l»e«M«tl«> IBM 



#58 
© 

© 

© 



TOUKG LOVERS 



37 48 68 MR. BASS MAN 

lonaa. CrabaJ. Kapp »3 

52 62 77 OUT OF MY MIND 

Johue liilot.t.n. ratkeare 1434 

24 26 27 THE GYKY CRIED 

Loa Ckrbjtlc, Roulette 4457 



40 



41 42 56 WHY DO LOVERS BREAK EACH 

OTHERS HEARTS 

Rob B. Son A the Blue Jem. Phltlts 110 

18 18 13 SEND ME SOME LOViH" 

San Cooke, RCA Vklar 1129 



(J) 45 57 85 VAKETY SAX 
© 

ft 

@ 46 46 

# 56 87 
(47) 51 78 



42 43 49 TELL HIM I'M HOT HOME 

Chuck lackion. Wand 131 

53 59 89 SANDY 



52 LOVE FOR SALE 

Arthur Ltuuui Group. HI-FI S»W 

PUFF 

Pear*. PaaJ A Mary. Waraer Bro*. 5340 

- OVER THE MOUNTAIN (Actou Hie Seal 



DON'T BE AFRAID, LITTLE DARLIN' 

mm f L-awreace, ColuaaiMa 42W« 



(48) 

© 
(50) 



48 50 66 THAT'S ALL 



26 12 8 FROM A JACK TO A KING 

Nad Mil it:. Faeor 114 

55 80 92 ALL OVER THE WORLD 

Nat Kinc Cole. Capitol 4*1« 

■' s Vi 29 20 14 YOU'VE REALLY 60T A HOLD ON ME. 

\~y Mlrarln. Taakbt S4073 

39 29 16 FLY HE TO THE M00H-B0SU NOVA. 

V£f/ Jew Harael A Ork, Kapp 4*7 

(7?\ 35 37 25 CAST YOUR FATE TO THE WIND 

\ZZ/ Vbara Caa-raMl Trio, Faalaiy »3 

(7t\ 30 32 33 HITCH HIKE 

\Zy Mur^c. Cure, Tract. 5«7S 

62 77 - YOU DON'T LOVE ME ANYMORE 

(Aim! I Cm Tell) 



(55J 

© 
© 

© 

® 
© 
© 

© 



38 38 28 CALL ON ME 
63 68 86 LINDA 



Jan aad Dean, Liberty 55S3I 

71 86 93 PIPfllNE 

Chantayr!, DM 14440 

47 27 18 LITTLE TOWN FLIRT 

Del Skaaaoa, Bl| Too 3131 

I GOT WHAT I WANTED 

Brook Beaton, Mrnary 720*4 



74 - 
67 70 

33 34 37 THAI'S THE WAY L0VL LS 



HE'S GOT THE POWER 

Etcttm, LnRed Arttati S72 



65 65 59 AS LONG AS SHE HEEDS ME 

Umm D,<l« fee Reurb* 10131 

89 YOUNG AND IN LOVE 

Dkk A DeeAee. Warwer Brae. 5342 

57 60 62 LETS STOMP 

Bobby CoaHtock. Lao a 101 



® 72 74 81 MEDITATION (fedifacao) . . 
Charlk mm. Rhei 

HOT 100— A TO Z— (Publisher-Licensee) 



SAX FIFTH AVENUE 4 

lohonr Brcchcr. Hrai Bro.. 3341 

RAINBOW 5 

Gene Ckaadter, Vee Jay 440 

I'M JUST A COUNTRY BOY 4 

Comic McCura. VA M 7,3 

I GOT A WOMAN 2 

Rhrft Ncujbo. D«m 31473 

JIVE SAMBA 6 

Cranonball Addcrlc; SocUt, Rlrmbla 4341 

BACK AT THE CHICKEN SHACK 3 

Jlaaaay Su-Jth, Rlava Nola 107T 

DEARER THAN LIFE 3 

Brook Bealoo. Mrnrury 720** 

SURFIN' U. S. A. 1 

Brack Bore Capitol 4931 

WATERMELON MAR 2 

Maeaao SaataaurtB. Raltte 45*0* 

I'M IN LOVE A6AIN 5 

Rkft Ncboo. laxxrtal 5911 

ETERNALLY 1 

"Tlill fllll. I o4tt 101 

PEPIHO'S FRIEND PASOUAl 

(The HiIlM Pusif-Cal! 3 

Lou Montr, Roprtae M144 

DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES A 2 

Aodj WHaw, Cotaauela 41474 

SUN ARISE 2 

RoH Harris, Epto 9947 

MECCA i 

One Piracy. MtMkae 1*21 

ON BROADWAY t 

Driften. AtlaeMk 11*2 

LOCKING UP MY HEART 1 

kOawakaOkM, Taaala 54*77 

KILLER JOE 1 

Rocky Feller, Strpltr 1244 

HOW CAN I FORGET 2 

Jimmy Holiday. Erereat 2012 

FOOLISH LITTLE GNU 1 

WrrUn, Seefyler 1241 

NOTHING GOES UP (Without 

Coming Down) 3 

Nul km r t'ol., Capitol 4919 

THEME FROM LAWRENCE OF ARABIA. . 6 

Ferruli A Tekher. t'alleej Arttftf 54J 

DON'T WANNA THINK ABOUT PAULA. 2 

Dicker Uc, Sarah 1M9I 

I WILL FOUOW HIM A 1 

l-btar Pec Maccb. RCA Victor 1.39 

GONE WITH THE WIND 1 

Dapreu. Coed 5*4 

THE DOG 3 

Rurtu ibooaoc. HC.I 13* 

CIGARETTES AND COFFEE BLUES A 2 

Marty Robbbii, I "«1u mhia 427*1 

THAT'S HOW HEARTACHES ARE MADE . 1 

Rakr WaaklatHM. So. 7t3 

LITRE STAR 2 

Bobby Cakndar. Rouktte 4471 

TOM CAT 1 

Rooftop Sincere. Vaaruant 35119 

THIS EMPTY PUCE 1 

D tonne Warwick, Scepter 1347 

DON'T LET ME CROSS OVER A 2 

Carl Butler. Columbia 415*3 

LITTLE BAND OF GOLD 1 

faoaca GRrralb. Joy 174 

TWO WRONGS DON'T MAKE A RIGHT. 1 

Mary WeR*. Motowa 103* 



BUBBLING UNDER THE HOT 100 



2 


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77 79 83 


6 


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(69) 


80 84 100 


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IZ 




86 




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66 83 84 


6 


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81 90- 


A 8 
5 
8 


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82 89 - 




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© 


83 


4 


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78 67 72 


8 


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2 


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84 85 — 


3 


(79) 


90 


A 3 


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88 


4 


ttr 




13 


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16 






13 


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94 


16 






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100-90 


3 
12 
5 


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t% 


91 92 - 
99 


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14 

2 


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97 


4 

10 
9 


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© 
© 
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1 
6 




4 







Alice in WaadtaUal midon 1MI) . 1* 

All I Nave te Da Ii Draan (krufl-Ratr, RMIJ... 17 

All Oeae Ike WaeleJ .Caiaet. A5CAP) 30 

Ai Lao« At She Hie** Me IHolli*. IMI) 43 

■■by Wsrkavit {MerriaidM. OMI) » 

B«ck el tk* Cbkkra Skack (flaiy. OMI) 73 

■lane It an Ike Betia Wera (AUan. OMI) ■ 

ion Guitar ilin4uane, RMI> 30 

■uttertly laky {Katnaan. AKAP) 37 

Call en Me (Ika. BMI) M 

Caa-t Cat Ui*4 la Uiinu Tau {Irenaer. OMI) .. 31 
Cait Tear Fate la tke VFimI (Frieaelihip, BMI) . S3 

Cl*ar*ttea 1 Ceflae Bleat IMoWly'i, BMI) M 

Dayi ef Wine in4 Reset -Ml acini (Wilwrk. ASCA" 

31 

Bayt ef Wlae a>4 Batet-Wllllami (Wllaiark. AICA->» 

7» 

Dewer Then L.la (Ntwtbridtjt, ASCA*) 71 

Ba the Bird (Kabnana, A1CA») 3« 

D«a. The iE.it BMI) *3 

Dan-t 0* Alrald, Little Daella' (AUea, BMI) 47 

Din t Let Me Cratt Over (Mertin. BMI) 9B 

Don r Say Helhln' Bad Akaut My Baby (Aldan. IM> 

34 

Don t Set Me Free (Tee-Pee, ASCAP) 34 

Han't Waana Thlak Abewl Pavle (J*ch. BMI) ... AJ 

Ead al Hie Waeld. The (Strrnaell, ASCAP) 3 

Eternally (BliAetelUn, BMI) 
Fly Me la tke I" 



Fallaw Ibe Bayi (Francen, ASCAP) 31 

Foeliik little Cirl (Aldoa, OMI) ... 04 

Freai a Jack la a Km f (Dandelien. BMI) 4* 

teat Wilk tke Wia4 {Bevrae, ASCAP) tl 

Creenkack Bellar lOavan. BMI) 3* 



Oypiy Cried. Tke (Paknled Desert, BMI) . 

He't Cat the Power aria. BMI) 

Me'i Sa Fine (Beigbl-Tunei, BMI) 

Hey Pauli (LeBillMatbill, BMI) 

Hitch Hike (Jeeete. d.Mi 

How Can I Feryet (Arrowhead. OMI) 

I Oat a Rtaiia (Pragretilre, OMI) 

I Gel What I Waalad <0an Day. BMI) 
I Wanaa Be Aeoend ICaxraaader. ASCAP) 

I Will Felkw Him (Leedi, ASCAP) 

I'm in Leer, Aaela (Trawl*, BMI) 
I'm Jast a Caualry Bey (Felkwayi, BMI) 

In Dream (AcaH-lexa, BMI) 

Ml Simee An. Ii.,, BMI) 

Killer Joe (Matlia-Wh>tt Ciitle, OMI) ... 

" r (Jahete. BMI) 

i Limko Same kUre (Kabnana. ASCAP) 

iei i Stamp (Rentevcll, BMI) 

Let'i Tarkey Tret (Alden. BMI) 

Liada (Warotk. ASCAP) 

Little Bi»d et Celd tBeaik. BMtl 

Little Star (Patrkia. OMI) . . 

Lillle Tewa Flirt i V ( ki- Me LiLoMir. BMII 
lechina Up My Heart (Jakete, BMII . 

Lore for Sale (Harm. ASCAP) 

Mima Didn't Lie (Curtom, BMI) 

Mecca (Jaauary. BMI) 

Medilatlan IMeditacaa) (Dutbeu. BMI) . . 

Mr. D**. Man (Jala, BMII 

Nething Gen Up IS*>*co-Cdta. OMI) 

On Bma4wav IkUon. BMI) 

One Brake- Heart for Sal* (Prttley. BMI) 
Ovr Day WIN Conrc .Rciewoael ASCAP) 

Our Wialer love (Cramarl. BMI) 

Out af My Miad Ride*. BMI) 



Over tke Menntlia (Arc. OMI) . , . , 4f> 

Pephno't Frirnd Piiqaal iRontinct-Sil Sonat, OMI) 70 

Pipeline ItHtraey, BMI) IB 

Pelf (Peaamar, ASCAP) 45 

Retake* (Cenrea^Cvrtom, BMI) <M 

Rhythm el the Rein (Shtrmen-DeVerian. BMI) 4 

Riiky Beky (Ti*tr, BMI) 13 

Sandy IDIMvcti-Rnadl. ASCAP) 43 

Sai FHtk Aeaaue (Ridk Active, BMI] 47 

Seat! Me Seme Levin' (Vantca, OMI) 4JJ 

Soalh Street IKatmaat., ASCAP) 7 

(Ardntore, ASCAP) 



Sirrfin 



U. S. A 1Art, OMII 



. 70 



Tall Him I'm Not Heme IFIguee, RMI1 

That'. All (Travh. BMI) in 

Thal't Haw Kearlacbei Arc Made (Sea-Lark, OMI) *4 

Thal't tke Way Ueo Ii (llaa. BMI) 67 

Theme From lawreat* *l Arebie (tt-awer. BMI) . . 11 

Thii Empty Place (W. S. HBBJ, AIUP) *7 

Tarn Cat (Ryartaa, OMI) W 

Turentv Mitel (Wyacate. Kabnana. ASCAP) 3* 

Twe Wreagt D*n't Make e Right <J»bal*. BMII .100 
WaR like a Mae riatv^ay-AaeaOama, ASCAP) . . 3 

Walk Right In (Ryeriaa, IMI) 33 

Watermelon Man Ikrlei, OMI) 75 

What Will My Mary Say (Una Drive, ASCAP) » 

Why Do lever* Break Each Other, Heart. (January. 

Wild Weekend (Sh*n-T*dd 1 Tapper, BMI) '. '. '. '. 15 

Tihety See (Tree, BMI) ... ....41 

T*u Doa't L*v* Me Aoyrmtro {Painted Defect. IMI) 35 

Young and in Love ■ 0dm. ASCAP) 44 

Toang Lover* (LaBill-kLarbilt. BMI) 35 

Tea're Ike leasa* I'm Living fAdertt. tttl} 3 

Toir've Rtilfy Got a HaM an Me Uebaia BMI! 51 



IOI. THE ll» 

102 STRUTTIH' WITH MARIA Marl 

103. I WIU LIVE MT LIFE FOR YOU 

104 DOHT MENTION MT name 

IDS. AMT 

10*. FUHNT MAN 

107. CALL ME IRRESPONSIBLE 

i OB IF TOU WANHA BE HAPPT - . 
10* WHAT ARI BOTS MAOC OF 

110. IS THIS ME? 

111. WHAT DOES A OIRL DO 

113. PRETTY BOY LONELT 

113. IF MART'S THERE 

114. HOW CAN I FORGET 

115. PEANUTS 4 le 

Hi. HERE I STAND 

117 DONT BE CRUEL 

lie DONT LIT ME CROSS 0VEB . 

II*. RIVER 

120. ANN4AAR1E 

131 WATERMELON MAM 

122 SHE'LL NEVER. HEVER LOVE TOU . 

133. PRIMA DONNA 

124 MEM0RT LANE 

IIS HEART 

124- TONI6HT I MET AH A NOEL 

127. DENVfR I 

135. I'LL MAKE IT ALL RIGHT 

13*. I LOVE TOU BECAUSE 

130 WORKOUT 

131. AHT WAV TOU WANHA 

133 MARCHING THRU MADRID Her 

133 TORE UP 

134 MT LITTLE GIRL 

135 HEART 



Alpert A the Tliuan* Brail, AIM 704 

Tony Beaaetl, Celambta 43534 

Shepherd Si it »m Atlantic 2174 

Paul Petertoa, Colple 474 

Ray Stevens. Mercury 730*4 

Frank Sinatra. Reprise 301S1 

Jiastwy Seal, SPQR 3105 

Pvo?*IH, ABC-Paramavat 10401 

Jim Reeves. RCA Vklw 4137 

Mania Blane, Seville 133 

Petti Pag*, CaksaWa 9*1471 

Iriaa Hykad, ABC-Param*imt 10400 

Bea 1. Klag. Area 4354 

sans, Vaa Jay IP 90) (Ealsadad Play) 

II* Chords, CaliMibla 42407 

...... Barbara lyna, Jamie 1344 

Adam Wad*, Epk *544 

tart*. Old Towa 1133 

Babaaats, Sablae 509 

. Herble Hancock, Ike Nate 1S(V2 

Tern a Brevnr, Philips 4004S 

tka Campbell, Capital 4*35 

Hippies. Parkway 143 

Kenny Chandler letrri* 315* 

Tokens, RCA VUter B144 

ew Christy Mlatirtle. Celambie <t2473 

ValentiSTras, Sar 137 

Al Mertino, Capitol 4930 

Mirkael CUrk. Imperial 5093 

Harvey. Tri-Phl 1017 

Alpert A lb* Ti|uan* Brass, AIM 704 

Harmonica Fat I. Oarcry SOOO 

Crkktta. Liberty S5S40 

Wayae Hearten, Capitol 4*30 





the nation's best selling records 



SIXTEEN SMASH HIT ALBUMS ON DOT 

1963'S EARLY HITS IDAYS OF WINE & ROSES I WALTZ TIME 
Lawrence Welk I Pat Boone I Lawrence Welk 



DLP 25510 DLP3510 



DLP 25504 DLP 3504 



DLP 25499 DLP 3499 



I 



1962'S GREATEST HITS 
Billy Vaughn 

DLP 25497 DLP 3497 



FOLK CONCERT 
Jimmie Rodgers 

DLP 25496 DLP 3496 


■ FAVORITES 1 
The Lennon Sisters 

DLP 25481 DLP 3481 


1 BOSSA NOVA JAZZ 1 
Steve Allen 

DLP 25480 DLP 3480 


1 FUNNY FONE CALLS 
Steve Allen 

DLP 3472 


A SWINGIN' SAFARI 
Billy Vaughn 

DLP 25458 DLP 3458 


■ BABY ELEPHANT WALK 1 
Lawrence Welk 

DLP 25457 DLP 3457 


1 GOLDEN HITS 1 
Pat Boone 

DLP 25455 DLP 3455 


1 GREATEST ORGAN HITS 
Jerry Burke 

DLP 25450 DLP 3450 


MOON RIVER 
Lawrence Welk 

DLP 25412 DLP 3412 


■ CALCUTTA 1 
Lawrence Welk 

DLP 25359 DLP 3359 


1 RAGTIME PIANO GAL 1 
Jo Ann Castle 

DLP 25249 DLP 3249 


1 BLUE HAWAII 
Billy Vaughn 

DLP 25165 DLP 3165 



— NEW RELEASE 

16461 DIAMOND HEAD SSiS?" ,c ' "7 HOW THE WEST WAS WON fES^S^tr*-. George Cates 

— — — ^ — BEST SELUNG SINGLES 

16440 Pipeline Chantay's 

16439 Meditation /Days Of W ine And Ro ses Pat Boo ne 

16453 Hot Pastrami The Dartells 

16452 Blue (THE ORIGINAL!) Bill Undsey 

16448 Heartaches /Happy Melody The String-A-Long* 

16450 p ace j n ft Q row j j Lonel y Tears Jimmie Rodgers 

16421 Boss TheRumbters 

16451 The End Of The World/ Big City The Mills Bros. 

16436 Release Me /My Smoky Mountain Home Billy Vaughn 

16457 Gravy Waltz /Preacherman Steve Allen 

^ 16456 Granny's Pad / Blues Bouquet . . . The Viceroys 

16455 sorry (For The Way I Treated You)/ Boss Strikes Back The Rumblers 

16454 1 Wonder Where You Are Tonight /Dream Girl . Arthur Alexander 

16449 Tia Juana Ball / Here Comes Mr. Love Bill Giant 




26 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23. 1963 




AUSTRALIA 

(Cmsrtesy Mule Maker, Sydney) 
•Denotes local origin 
Tab 1 >sl 
Week Week 

1 I FROM A JACK TO A KING 

— Ned Mnier (WAG)— 
Alberts 

2 3 WALK LIKE A MAN— 

The Four Seasons (Festivals) 
— No publisher 

3 2 HEY PAULA — Paul and 

Paula (Philips)— Chappells 

4 6 TELL HIM— The Exciters 

(UA>— Chappelli 

5 4 BLAME IT ON THE BOSSA 

NOVA Eydie Gorme 

(CBS)— Tu-Con 

6 7 COME A LITTLE CLOSER— 

•The Delltones (Festival)— 
Belinda 

7 11 RUBY BABY — Dion (CBS)— 

No publisher 

8 8 BALLAD OF LOVERS HILL 

— Teresa Brewer (Philips) — 
Leeds 

9 10 LITTLE TOWN FLIRT— 

Del Shannon (London) — 
Belinda 

10 9 WALK RIGHT IN — 

Rooftop Singers (Astor) — 
— Southern 

1 1 5 RETURN TO SENDER— 

Elvis Presley (RCA)— 
Belinda 

12 — LET'S LIMBO SOME MORE 

— Chubby Checker 

(Columbia) 

— No publisher 

13 12 HALF HEAVEN, HALF 

HEARTACHE — Gene Pitney 
(UA>— Belinda 

14 13 FLY ME TO THE MOON— 

Joe HameU (Kapp)— Belinda 

15 14 SURFSIDE— •Diner Revell's 

Denvermen (HMV>— Johnny 
Devlin Music 



BRITAIN 

(A special])- complied list In advance of 
publication of the New Musical Express, 



♦Demotes local origin 
This Last 
Week Week 

1 3 SUMMER HOLIDAY — 

•Cliff Richard (Columbia)— 
Elstrec Music 

2 1 PLEASE PLEASE ME— 

'Beatles (Parlophone)— 
Dick James Music 

3 6 THAT'S WHAT LOVE WILL 

DO — "Joe Brown (Piccadilly) 
— Jack Good Music 

4 4 THE NIGHT HAS A THOU- 

SAND EYES— Bobby Vee 
(Liberty) — Aberbach 

5 2 THE WAYWARD WIND — 

•Frank Ifield (Columbia)— 
Lafleur 

6 10 LIKE I'VE NEVER BEEN 

GONE — •Billy Fury (Decca) 
— Shapiro- Bernstein 

7 5 LOOP DE LOOP— * Frank le 

Vaughan (Philips) — Chappcll 

8 17 DIAMONDS— *Jet Harris- 

Tony Meehan (Decca) — 
Francis, Day A Huiter 

9 18 TELL HIM — •BHlie Davis 

(Decca)— Mellin Music 

10 8 ISLAND OF DREAMS— 

•Springfield* (Philips)— 
Chappcll 

11 20 ONE BROKEN HEART FOR 

SALE — Elvis Presley (RCA) 
— Helen Range Music 

12 — FOOT TAPPER — 'Shadows 

(Columbia) — Elstrec Music 

13 16 HEY PAULA— Paul and Paula 

(Philips)— One Four Two 
Music 

14 14 CH A RM AINE — 'Bachelors 

(Decca) — Keith Prowse 

15 15 HAVA NAGILA— •Spotnicks 

(Oriole) — Leeds Music 

16 13 ALL ALONE AM I— Brenda 

Lee (Brunswick) — Leeds 
Music 

17 II WALK RIGHT IN— Rooftop 

Singers (Fontana) — Southern 
Music 

18 9 LITTLE TOWN FLIRT— Del 

Shannon (London) — Vlcki 
Music 

19 26 CUPBOARD LOVE— 'John 

Leyton (HMV) — Essex Music 

20 12 SUKIYAKI— 'Kenny Bah" 

(Pye)— Welbeck Music 

21 29 RHYTHM OF THE RAIN— 

Cascades (Warner Bros.) — 
E. H. Morris 

22 23 BACHELOR BOY — 'Cliff 

Richard (Columbia)— Elstree 
Music 

23 30 FROM A JACK TO A KING 

—Ned Miller (London)— 
Palace Music 

24 20 HI-LILI. HI-LO— Richard 

Chamberlain (MOM)- 
Robbins Music 
2$ — SAY WONDERFUL THINGS 
— "Ronnie Carroll (Philips) 
— Mutual Music 

26 17 GLOBETROTTER— 

"Tornadoes (Decca) — Ivy 
Music 

27 28 THE NEXT TIME— 

•Cliff Richard (Columbia)— 
Elstree Music 

28 19 LIKE 1 DO— 'Maureen Evans 

(Oriole) — Bourne Music 



28 — BOSS GUITAR— Duane Eddy 
(RCA)— Shapl ro-Bemste in 

30 — OLD SMOKEY LOCOMO- 
TION— Little Eva (London) 
— Aldon Music 



EIRE 

(Courtesy Irish Tbs.es, Ltd., Dublin) 
(bis Last 
Week Week 

1 3 THE WAYWARD WIND— 

Frank Ifield (Columbia)— 
Lafleur 

2 1 LITTLE TOWN FLIRT— 

Del Shannon (London)— 
Vicki 

3 5 THAT'S WHAT LOVE WILL 

DO — Joe Brown (Picadilly)— 
Jack Good 

4 6 ALL ALONE AM I— Brenda 

Lee (Brunswick) — Leeds 

5 4 DIAMONDS — Harris/ Mcehati 

([jcccj) — Francis, Day ft 
Hunter 

6 9 FROM A JACK TO A KING 

— Ned Miller (London)— 
Alberts 

7 7 LIKE I DO — Maureen Evans 

(Oriole) — Bourne Music 

8 — SUMMER HOLIDAY — CI iff 

Richard (Columbia) — 
Elstrect 

9 2 ISLAND OF DREAMS— 

The Springfields (Philips)— 
Chappell 
10 8 LOOP DE LOOP— 

Frankie Vaughan (Philips) — 
Chappell 



FLEMISH BELGIUM 

(Courtesy Jnke Box Magazine) 
•Denotes local origin 
Two 
This Weeks 
Week A to 

1 1 COEUR BLESSE— Pelula 

Clark (Vogue)— Acuff-Rosc 

2 2 EENZAAM ZONDF.R JOU— 

•Will TUra (Palelte>-Top 
Music 

3 3 THE NEXT TIME/BACHE- 

LOR BOY — Cliff Richard 
(Columbia) 

4 7 CRYING IN THE WIND/ 

LOVE— Paul Anka (RCA)— 
Spanka 

5 > JUNGE, KOMM BALD 

WIEDER— Freddy (Polydor) 
— Bens 

6 4 RETURN TO SENDER — 

Elvis Presley (RCA) — 
Belinda 

7 6 ESO BESO— Paul Anka 

(RCA) — Spanka 

8 5 LETS DANCE— Chris Montez 

(London)— Chappell 

9 13 SANS-TOI. MAMIE— 

•Adamo (HMV>— Rudo 

10 " ALL ALONE AM I— Brenda 

Lee (Brunswick) — Bens 



FRANCE 



Tkls Last 
Week Week 

1 1 TOUS LES GARCONS ET LES 
FILLES/J'SUIS D'ACCORD 
— Francoise Hardy (Vogue) 

2 2 TF I STAR — Les Tornadoes 

(Decca); Les Compagnons 
(Polydor); Colette Dereal 
(Polydor) 

3 3 J'ENTENDS S1FFLER LE 

TRAIN/LION— Richard 
Anthony (Columbia) 

4 4 I'DOLE DES JEUNES/ 

ELLE EST TERRIBLE— 
Johnny Hallyday (Philips) 

5 — ON TWISTE SUR LE LOCO- 

MOTION— Richard Anthony 
(Columbia) 

6 10 OUI JE T'AIME— Eddy 

Mitchell (Barclay) 

7 7 CHANCE/IL REVIENT— 

Sylvle Vartan (RCA) 

8 — A MALYPENSE/POUR UNF 

AMOURETTE— Leny 
Escudero (Bel Air) 

9 8 NON MONSIEUR— 

Los Machucambos (Decca) 
10 — SPOTNICKS THEME/ 

JOHNNY GUITAR— The 
Spotnicks (President) 



GERMANY 

(Courtesy AutoBuuen-Markt, 
Braonschwelg) 

This Last 
Week Week 

1 2 CASANOVA BACIAM1 — 

Pelula Clark (Deutsche 
Vogue) — Montana 

2 I JUNGE. KOMM BALD 

WIEDER— Freddy (Polydor) 
— Sikorski/Esplanade 
J 3 GAUCHO MEXICANO/ 
JALISCO — Renare u. 
Werner Leismann (Arlola); 
John Buck (Warner Brothers) 
—Melodic der Welt 

4 14 ICH KAUF MIR LIEBER 

E1NEN TIROLERHUT — 
Billy Mo (Decca) — Busse 

5 6 BONANZA— Ralf Paulsen 

(Electrola) — Chappell 

6 5 ESO BESO— Paul Anka (RCA) 

— Spanka 



7 4 WENN DU GEHST — 

Connie Francis (MGM) — 
Viktoria 

8 10 DER KING (King of the 

Whole Wide World)— Die 
Missouris (Tdcfunkeo): 
Elvis Presley (RCA)— 
Aberbach 

9 II HELLO BOY — Grethe Ins- 

mann (Metronome) — Inlro 

10 19 HOCHZE1T IN LOUISIANA 

— Caterina Valente (Decca) 
— Intro 

11 20 MASKENBALL BEI SCOT- 

LAND YARD— Bill Ramsey 
(Columbia)— Gerig; HALLO 
BOSS — Billy Ramsey (Co- 
lumbia) — Gerig 

12 8 FUR GABY TU' ICH ALLES 

— Gerd Bottcher (Decca) — 
Buddc 

Budde; DU SCHAUST 
MICH AN/SHF'S NOT 
YOU— Elvis Presley (RCA): 
Gerd Bottcher (Decca) — 
Aberbach 

13 — MADDALENA — Res Glldo 

(Electrola) — Gerig 

14 7 RETURN TO SENDER/ 

ZURUCK AN JOHNNY — 
Elvis Presley (RCA)— 
Aberbach 

15 9 LET'S DANCE/TANZ MIT!— 

Silvio Francesco (Decca); 
Chris Montez (London) — 
Melodic der Welt 

16 12 HOLZHACKER TWIST— 

Frank Kopper (Mandolino) 

17 — PEP1NO (PEPINO THE 

ITALIAN MOUSE)— Vico 
Torriani (Decca) — Staal 

18 13 DIE LETZETE ROSE DER 

PRARIE— Martin Lauer 
(Polydor) — Gerig 

19 — TRAUMEN. 1ST DAS NICHT 

WUNDERSCHON — Grit 
van Hoog (Telefunken) — 
Hi-Fi 

20 17 SHEILA (ARME KLEINE 

SHEILA) — Tommy Roe 
(Philips)— Siesel 



HOLLAND 

(Cotsrtesy Plalennleuws, Ansersioort) 
This Last 
Week Wank 

1 I BACHELOR BOY/THE 

NEXT — Cliff Richard 
(Columbia) — Basart 

2 2 CATOOTJE— Wim Sonneveld 

(Philips)— Basart L. C. 

3 3 LIMBO ROCK — Chubby 

Checker (Cameo/Parkway) — 
Bens 

4 4 JUNGE, KOMM' BALD 

WIEDER — Freddy (Polydor) 
— Bens-Altona 

5 5 BLUME VON TAHITI— 

Gert Timmerman (Tele- 
funken) — Holland Music 

6 6 SOERABAYA— *Anneke 

Gronloh (Philips); Imca 
Marina (Imperial) — Basart 
L. C. 

7 7 LET'S DANCE — Chris Montez 

(London) — Chappell 

8 8 DANCE ON— The Shadows 

(Columbia) — Altona 

9 9 PARADISO— Anneke Gronloh 

(Philips) — Altona 
10 10 MONSIEUR— Pelula Clark 
(Imperial) — Basart L. C. 



HONG KONG 

Thb Last 
Week Week 

1 1 A LITTLE BIT OF SOAP— 

The Fabulous Echoes 
(Diamond) 

2 — ONE BROKEN HEART FOR 

SALE — Elvis Presley (RCA) 
J — SUMMER HOLIDAY— 

Cliff Richard (Columbia) 

4 4 RHYTHM OF THE RAIN— 

The Cascades (Warner Bros.) 

5 — DANCING WITH THE 

GUITAR MAN— Duane 
Eddy (RCA) 

6 — LETS LIMBO SOME MORE 

— Chubby Checker 
(Parkway) 

7 5 BACHELOR BOY— Cliff 

Richard (Columbia) 

8 9 BABY ELEPHANT WALK— 

Lawrence WeUc (Dot) 

9 — QUEEN FOR TONIGHT— 

Helen Shapiro (Columbia) 

10 8 1 MAY NOT LIVE TO SEE 

TOMORROW— Brian 
Hyland (ABC) 



ITALY 

(Courtesy Muilca e Dktchi, Milan) 
•Denotes Vocal origin 
This Last 
Week Week 

1 1 UNO PER TUTTE— 

•Tony Renis (VdP); •Emilio 
Pericoli (Ricordi) 

2 2 OIOVANE GIOVANE — 

•Pino Donaggio (Columbia); 
•Cocki Mazzetti (Primary) 

3 3 AMOR. MON AMOUR, MY 

LOVE — •Claudio Villa 
(Cetra) 

4 4 CHARIOT— •Betty Curtis 

(CGD); Petula Clark 
(Vogue); Franck Pourcel 
(VdP) 



5 7 COME TE NON C'E' 

NESSUNO— *Rlta Pavone 
(RCA) 

6 5 LA PARTITA DI PALLONE 

—•Rita Pavone (RCA); 
•Cocki Mazzetti (Primary) 

7 6 RICORDA — *M0va (Cetra) 

• 13 FATT1 MANDARE DALLA 
MAMMA— •Gianni Morandi 
(RCA) 

9 8 ADDIO MONDO CRUDELE 
•Peppino Di Capri (Carisch) 

10 9 NON COSTA NIENTE — 

•Johnny Doreltl (CGD); 
•Wilma De Antells (Philips) 

11 — IL CROWN— »Nini Rosso 

(Sprint) 

12 — BACI — •Remo German! (Jolly) 

13 12 LA TERZA LUNA— NeU 

Sedaka (RCA) 

14 14 TOPOLINO— Gil Fields 

(Derby) 

15 10 DESAFINADO — Joao 

Gilberto (Bluebell) 



MEXICO 

(Courtesy Audloeaoslca, Mexico CHy) 

•Denotes local origin 
This Last 
Week Week 

1 1 AL DI LA— Pericoli (Warner 

Bros.) — Emmi 

2 2 EL LADRON— •Sonora San- 

tanera (CBS) — Reimsa 

3 3 COSAS (Things)— 'Oscar 

Madrigal (Gamma) — Pending 

4 4 YA NO (I Know)— •Rebeldcs 

del Rock (Orfeon) — Pending 

5 8 AY CARINO— Javier Soils 

(CBS)— Pham 

6 7 PA TODO EL ANO— 

•J. A. Jimenez (RCA)— 
Pham 

1 6 EL NIDO— »Sonora 

Santanera (CBS) — Pham 

8 5 VENUS — Santo and Johnny 

Farina (Gamma) — Pham 

9 — TOMBOLA— Lorenza Lory 

(RCA); Monna Bell 
(Gamma) — Reimsa 

10 10 ESO BESO— 'Paul Anka 

(RCA)— Bramblla 



NORWAY 



(Courtesy Verde ns Gang) 
•Denotes local origin 
This Last 
Week Week 

1 I JEG V1L HA EN BLA 

BALLONG — •Arne 
Bcndikscn (Trioia) — 
Stockholms Musikproduklion 

2 2 RETURN TO SENDER — 

Elvis Presley (RCA)— 
Belinda 

3 5 DIAMONDS— Jet Harris-Tony 

Meehan (Decca) — Norsk 
Musikforlag 

4 3 MIDNATTSTANOO— 

•Ase Wentzel-Jan Holland 
(Odcon) — Musikk-Huset 

5 7 FJERNE LAND— •The Key 

Brothers (Triola) — Egil Monn 
Iversen 

6 — SUMMER HOLIDAY— 

Cliff Richard iColumbia)- 
Musikk-Huset 

7 9 LOOP THE LOOP— 

Frankie Vaughan (Philips) — 
Thore Erling 

8 6 REGNIGA NATT — Anna-Lena 

Lofgren (Metronome) — 
Manu 

9 4 DANCE ON— The Shadows 

(Columbia) — Bens Music 
10 — ALL STAR FESTIVAL LP — 
Various Artists (UNO) 



PERU 



(Courtesy La rVensa, 1 1— ■) 
Tata Last 
Week Weak 

1 I ESPERANZA— Pedrito Rico 

(RCA); Tito Alberli 
(Philips); Los Espanoles 
(Polydor); Lucho Macedo 
(MAG); Enrique Lynch 
($ono Radio) 

2 2 TWIST DE LOS OJOS 

NEGROS — Tulio Gallo 
(Philips); Eulogio Molina 
(Odeon) 

3 3 PERDONAME— Duo 

Dinamico (Odeon); Mirla 
(Velvet) 

4 4 LA POLLERA COLORA— 

Los Hop is (Virrey); Lucho 
Macedo (MAG); Pedro 
Saicedo (Sono Radio) 

5 5 BIENVENIDO AMOR— 

Palito Ortega (RCA) 

6 7 DAME FELICIDAD — 

Enrique Guzman (Columbia) 

7 — CUANDO LLORA Ml GUI- 

TARRA — Los Kipui (Odeon) 

8 9 HERMOSA LAURA— Loud 

Jets (Columbia) 

9 6 AMOR — Paul Anka (RCA) 
10 _ ALBR1CIAS — Anamelba 

(Virrey) 



3 5 HOW MUCH IS THAT 

DOGGIE IN THE 
WINDOW— Baby Jane A 
the Rockabyea (UA) — 
Mareco 

4 3 RETURN TO SENDER— 

Elvis Presley (RCA)— 
Filipinas 

3 7 ALICE IN WONDERLAND— 
Neil Sedaka (RCA)— 
Filipinas 

6 6 RED RIVER TWANG— 

The String-A-Longs 
(Pioneer) — No Licensee 

7 10 LIMBO MAN — Ivy Pete A 

His Limbomaniaca (Pioneer) 
— No Licensee 

8 4 TILL THE END OF TIME— 

Delia Reese (RCA)— 
Filipinas 

9 — PUNCH LINE — Doreen Dank* 

A Bobby Lyons (Alfro) 

10 — DEVIL WOMAN— Marty 

Robbins (Columbia)— 
Mareco 



SOUTH AFRICA 

(Coeotesy Souther* African Record 
Manufacture™ and Distributors' AaSB. 
Tkb Last 
W eek W cck 

1 1 BACHELOR BOY — 

Cliff Richard (Columbia)— 
Elstree Music 

2 3 RETURN TO SENDER— 

Efrij Presley (RCA)— 
Belinda Music 

3 4 PATCHES— Dickey Lee 

(Philips)— Aldon Music 

4 2 DANCE ON— The Shadows 

(Columbia) — Sidney Bron 
Music 

5 6 DIAMONDS — Jet Harris A 

Tony Meehan (Decca) — 
Francis, Day A Hunter 

6 6 WALK RIGHT IN— The 

Rooftops Singers (Renown) 
— Southern Music 

7 5 MIDNIGHT SNACK — 

Bert Kaempfert (Polydor)— 
Gene-Belinda Music 
K — THE LONGEST DAY— Mitch 
Miller (CBS) — Robbins 
Music 

9 — FROM A JACK TO A KING 

— Ned Miller (Renown) — 
Burl ington Music 

10 7 THEME FROM DR. NO— 

John Barry Seven (Columbia) 
—United Artists 



SPAIN 



(Conrtesy Disco mania. Madrid) 

'Denotes local origin 
this Last 
Week Week 

1 2 BALADA GIT ANA — 'Duo 

Dinamico (Voz du su Amo) 
—Del Sur 

2 1 ESO BESO — Paul Anka (RCA) 

— Hiapavox 

3 3 EL PECADOR — Lucho Gatica 

(Voz de Su Amo)— Del Sur 

4 4 SPEEDY GONZALES — 

Pal Boone (Dot-Columbia) — 
Del Sur 

5 — J'ENTENDS SIFFLER LE 

TRAIN— Los T.N.T. (RCA) 
— Robert Mellin Iberlca 

6 5 I CANT STOP LOVING 

YOU— Ray Charles 'ABC - 
Hispavox)— Hispavox 

7 — LIMBO ROCK— Chubby 

Checker (RCA) 

8 — CUANDO CALIENTA EL 

SOL— Hnos. Rigual (RCA)— 
Del Sur 

9 8 A STEEL GUITAR AND A 

GLASS OF WINE— 
Paul Anka (RCA) — Hispavox 
10 10 ET MAINTENANT — 

Gilbert Becaud (La Voz de 
su Amo) — Armonico 



SWEDEN 



PHILIPPINES 



This Last 
Week Week 

1 1 FROM THE BOTTOM OF 

MY HEART — Jerry Vale 
(Columbia) — Mareco 

2 2 TELL HIM — The Exciters 

(UA)— Mareco 



this Last 
Week Week 

4 I SAW LINDA YESTERDAY 
—Dickey Lee (Philips)— 
Sweden Music 

2 "DE TUSEN SJOARNAS 
LAND — Ray Adams 
(Fontana) — Gchrmans 

I STAND UP — Michael Cox 
(HMV)— Bens Music 

3 BACHELOR BOY— 
CUH Richards (Columbia)— 
Gchrmans 

5 •FROKEN JOHANSSON OCH 

JAG — Oijvinds (Odeon) — 
Odeon 

6 6 RETURN TO SENDER— 

Elvia Presley (RCA)— 
Belinda 

7 7 DANCE ON— The Shadows 

(Columbia) — Bens Musk 

8 — SKIP TO MY LOU — 

Nat King Cole (Capitol)— 
Sweden Music 

9 I DESAFINADO — Stan Getz 

(Verve)— Stockholras 
Musikproduktion 
10 10 KISS ME QUICK— Elvis 
Presley (RCA) — Belinda 



SMSATIONAU 









FOR 

uurno 


*% 1 


HISTY 



M. 
2** 



AMERICA 

'M COAST TO CO, 




N ARM 



NATIONAL ASSOCIATION of RECORD MERCHANDISERS 
PROUDLY PRESENTS THE 

BEST SELLING COMEDY 
RECORDING ARTIST AWARD 

1962 

TO 

^RUSTY WARREN 

THANKS 



TO 



STANFORD ZUCKER 

PERSONAL MANAGER 

"Without your profound guidance and 
kindred interest, this wonderful tribute 
would not have been possible." 



JERRY BLAINE 

JUBILEE RECORDS 

"Thank you for the gamble. Happy we are 
both winning." 



ROSE MARIE GROSS 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

"Heartfelt thanks for your faith, confi- 
dence and personal support." 



Copyrigl 



28 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 




SAN REMO ECHO 

Everybody's Warbling 
Those Sue-You Blues 




ROSES A' RAMBLIN': A lovely group of Japanese lasses from 
Toshiba Records present a bouquet to Nat King Cole upon his 
arrival in Tokyo. Toshiba distributes Capitol in this country. 



By SAM'L STEINMAN 

ROME — There has been a 
spate of suits over plagiarism 
in the wake of the San Remo 
Festival. In addition to the 
suit against Tony Renis for 
plagiarism of his prize winner, 
"One for All," another is being 
threatened by Boylan Adamic of 
Radio Ljubjana, Yugoslavia, 
who claims that the first three 
notes of a tune he did for a 
film three years ago are identi- 
cal and that Renis has admitted 
in an interview that he first 
tried out the tune in a Ljubjana 
night club. 

Another source now claims 
the tune is like an old American 
song. At the same time a group 
of veterans of the war and 
Alpinists have asked that public 
action be taken against the 



AUSTRALIA 



Push Twin Hits 
Off With a Rush 

By GEORGE till HI R 
19 Todman Ave., Kensington 
Sydney, N.s.w . 

Radio Corporation, manufac- 
turers of Melbourne who dis- 
tribute the Verve, Hi-Fi and 
Vanguard labels throughout Aus- 
tralia, have issued their first sin- 
gle label since losing the Mer- 
cury catalog to Philips late 1962. 
New logo is Twin Hits, recorded 
in America, featuring cover ver- 
sions of hit tunes. The first re- 
lease of six singles hit the chain 
stores and retail trade February 
18; in two days of trading Syd- 
ney stores had bought 5,000 
disks and Melbourne 4,000. The 
records are receiving heavy air 
exposure even though the lop 
disk jockey refuses to play cov- 
er versions. 

The disk is retailing at a 50 
per cent lower price than the 
standard 45 r.p.m., which sells 
at $1. Twin Hits singles retail 
at 50 cents. The initial release 
includes "Ruby Baby" b.w. 
"Loop de Loop," "Rhythm of 
the Rain" b.w. "Hey Paula." 
Hilary Melick, Sydney record 
manager of Radio Corporation, 
states that the launching cam- 
paign will include window dis- 
plays, television exposure on all 
national teen shows plus press 
and radio advertising. 

London Records reports a 
hold up in the release of the 
Crescendo album, "Arthur Ly- 
man at the Crescendo," as one 
of the tracks, "Days of Wine 
and Roses," is on the restriction 
list until Warner Bros, decides 
upon a release date of the flick. 

RCA has scheduled the first 
three albums in the series, "Our 
Man In," for early March re- 
lease. . . . From the moment 
ATN TV station, Sydney first 
began playing an Hawaiian tune 
between programs and inquiries 



second-place song, "Amor, Mon 
Amour, My Love" which is like 
a wartime favorite, "Silence." 

To top it all, the Alba publish- 
ing house is proposing an action 
against Mexico's Rigual Broth- 
ers and the Italian lyricist of 
"Quando Calienta El Sol" (When 
the Sun Warms), one of the 
summer's top tunes, on the 
charge that it is a plagiarism of 
an oldie from 1957 named 
"Carry Me Away With You." 
The Italian lyricist of the Mexi- 
can song is also the lyricist of 
the Renis hit. 

Meanwhile maestro Pasquale 
Frustaci, who filed the first 
plagiarism suit against Renis and 
the festival-winning song, has 
come out of obscurity to write 
a magazine article reminding the 
public of his successful musical 
shows of the 1930's and 1940's. 

Renis, who is 25, has told 
the press that he was not old 
enough to go to the theater when 
the song he is supposed to have 
plagiarized was presented on 
stage. Frustaci has presented an 
affidavit by nine top musicians, 
conductors and critics stating 
that they note a grave similarity 
in the introduction of the two 
tunes. 



got so numerous that A R C. 
decided to rush release the sin- 
gle which was acquired from the 
Southern Music mood library. 
The title, "Hawaiian Calypso," is 
a Dutch composition by J. Van 
Wetter, played by the Brussel's 
New Concert Orchestra and re- 
leased on the CBS label. 

This is the third time a mood 
theme has become popular 
through play over radio and TV 
in the past three months. The 
other two numbers, "Happy 
Guitar" and "Dalilia," originated 
from the Chappell library and 
were both hits throughout Aus- 
tralia. 

London Records will release 
the second Starday album early 
in March under a four-disk 
agreement. The album, "Carter 
Family Memorial Album," by 
Bill CUfton, is to receive a spe- 
cial country push. . . . Now that 
United Artist Pictures scheduled 
the opening of the movie 'Taras 
Bulba," for April, Ray Anthony 
on Capitol and Ferrante & 
Teicher single plus the sound- 
track album from U. A., are 
among the first disks of the film 
music. 

All record companies in Aus- 
tralia are at present releasing 
both single and album disks, 
either simultaneously or before 
the scheduled American release. 
Leaders in the field for quick 
releases are EMI, A.R.C. and 
RCA. . . . Andy Williams' al- 
bums are receiving a lot of at- 
tention these days. London Rec- 
ords continue to issue the old 
Cadence material while A.R.C, 
for March, are releasing "Moon 
River and Other Movie Themes" 
and in the same week's release 
MGM is offering a similar al- 
bum by Connie Francis singing 
"Award Winning Motion Pic- 
ture Hits." Both companies 



Tomla-Motown 
Execs Swing 
Across Europe 

LONDON— Berry Gordy Jr., 
Esther Edwards and Barney 
Ales, execs of the Tamla-Mo- 
town group of Detroit left here 
March 9 on a swing around 
Europe. After calls in Berlin 
and Hamburg last week, the trio 
will be in Rome until Monday 
(18). The subsequent itinerary 
was Venice (Hotel Bauer Grun- 
wald) March 18-21; Milan (Prin- 
cipe e Savoia) 21-22; Zurich 
(Carlton Elite) 22-23; Paris 
(King George V) 23-29; Am- 
sterdam (Hilton) 29-31; Copen- 
hagen March 31 -April 2, when 
the party is due back in London. 



EMI Dividend 

LONDON — The board of 
Electric and Musical Industries 
has declared an interim dividend 
of 5 per cent on the ordinary 
stock of the firm. It will be 
paid March 30 in respect of 
the year ending June 30, 1963. 
The interim dividend is the same 
as last year. 



claim that there is a big demand 
for movie theme music and con- 
tinue to issue similar disks 
practically each month. 




Gordy & friends 
On Talking Whirl 

By DON WEDGE 

News Editor, 
New Musical Express 

Berry Gordy Jr., Esther Ed- 
wards and Barney Ales, three 
executives of Tamla-Motown 
group, hit London as the first 
stage of their European tour to 
investigate future expansion. As 
well as meetings with Oriole 
executives, their current repre- 
sentatives in Britain, they met 
British Decca chief Sir Edward 
Lewis; L. G. Wood, managing 
director of EMI Records, and a 
host of publishing personalities 
in connection with their Jobete 
firm during their first week here. 
After visiting continental firms 
in a number of cities, they re- 
turn to London on the way back 
to Detroit and before making 
final decisions. 

Tommy Roe, in for a tour, 
brought the tape of his next 
single, "The Folk Singer," with 
him. EMI rush-released it on 
HMV ahead of its U. S. issue. 

"Carnival" ended its London 
run March 9 after only 35 per- 
formances. "Porgy and Bess" in 
Todd A-O switched from the 
Dominion to the smaller Colum- 
bia Theater. Hayley Mills is 
among the stars taking part in 
the stage performance at the 
Royal Film Show. . . . Vainer 
Paulson, program director 
WNEW, New York, was in for 
talks with BBC's radio music di- 
rector Donald MacLean about 
special programs by the Ted 
Heath band for airing in the 
U. S. Considerable part of BBC 
radio output is live pop music. 

Bobby Weiss, international di- 
rector of Warner Bros. Records, 
was back in London for the first 
time this year. His negotiations 
included long-term planning for 
future releases and internal dis- 
tribution matters with British 
Decca, which handles Ihe War- 
ner label here, and with execu- 
tives of EMI's international divi- 
sion about releases handled by 
that group. 

Howie Richmond devoted 



much of his time here to plan- 
ning exploitation of Dimitri 
Tiomkln's score for "Fifty-five 
Days to Peking." The film has 
a London world premiere May 5 
and it is possible that Andy Wil- 
liams, who has recorded "So 
Little Time" from the film, will 
be here for the premiere. The 
Brothers Four have recorded a 
title theme from the movie. 
Richmond also had talks with 
Lionel Bart about the U. S. pub- 
lication of the composer's forth- 
coming stage musical. . . . Bart 
himself was back from a short 
trip to the U. S., during which 
he attended the New Orleans 
Mardi Gras. He said that the 
next musical he was likely to 
finish would be "Maggie May." 
... Sal Chiantia, of Leeds Mu- 
sic, was in for talks with Cyril 
Simons, head of the firm's Brit- 
ish affiliate. . . . Brice Somers, 
international director of Mer- 
cury Records, is due in for talks 
with EMI's overseas division, re- 
turning from Chicago in mid- 
month to his Geneva headquar- 
ters. 

Record Business 

EMI has acquired British 
master right for its Stateside 
label of the Challengers' "Surf 
Beat" LP from Jack Lewerke of 
Hollywood. Album release will 
be preceded by a single. . . . 
Oriole issued the first disk here 
by the Miracles (from Tamla) — 
the group's "You've Really Got 
a Hold on Me." . . . Decca is- 
sued new title by Ihe Tornadoes, 
"Robot," written and produced 
by Joe Meek. . . . The Johnny 
Dankworth Orchestra switches 
labels to Fontana (Philips) this 
month on the expiration of its 
contract with Roulette Records 
of New York. 

From the estate of Ell Ober- 
stein, Ember Records acquired 
an album, "Romance and Rose." 
recorded by David Rose and 
orchestra. From King, Ember 
obtained an Earl Bostic album, 
"Dance Time." . . . Decca has 
signed Australian singer Ian 
Crawford, who made his bow 
with "Everlovin' Me." . . . Em- 
ber has acquired the British right 
from the Swedish Sonet label to 
issue Larry Moon's recording of 
"Tia Juana Ball," a Buddy Kaye 
song. . . . Another Sonet master 
has gone to EMI. "Ghia," by 
the Violents, has been issued on 
HMV. . . . Saga has issued the 
British c.&w. LP, "Cowboy," 
made at its own studio by Roy 
Guest and Jack Fallon. 

Publishing News 

In a venture outside its usual 
confines Chappells is now pub- 
lishing, through a subsidiary, a 
quartedly magazine Folk. . . . 
The Performing Right Society 



is increasing its charges to local 
authorities for the use of music. 
It is asking for 2 per cent of 
expenditure by local authorities 
on musical entertainment and 5 
per cent of the income received 
from the letting of premises. 
This is a considerable increase 
on previous scales, which have 
been on a sliding basis. It is 
being opposed by the Associa- 
tion of Municipal Corporations, 
which is likely to refer it to 
arbitration before the Perform- 
ing Right Tribunal. 



CBS Power Hits 
In New Releases 

By EDDIE ADAMIS 
92 quai du Marechal Hoffre 
Courbevoie (Seine) 

French CBS releases have just 
been marketed. Among them 
Maurice Fanon, who received a 
1963 award of the "Grand Prix 
du Disque de l'Academie Charles 
Cros," has "Avec Fanon." Dion 
and Eydte Gorme were launched 
wilh their current U. S. hits 
"Ruby Baby" and "Blame it 
on the Bossa Nova." Thelonious 
Monk's first CBS album 
"Monk's Dream" has been re- 
leased to tie in with his con- 
cert at the Olympia Theater. 
French poet-diseur Jean Marc 
Tennberg's new recital, called 
"De Carco a Voltaire" will be 
the first CBS album of French 
poetry. 

Two French songs "L'amour 
s'en va" and "A force de prier" 
have been selected as Monte 
Carlo's and Luxembourg's en- 
trants for Eurovision Contest to 
be held in London March 23. 
Singers will be Francois* Hardy 
(Vogue) and Nana Mouskouri 
(Philips) respectively. 

Barclay Records issued a 
batch of original soundtracks 
from French pics. Latest are 
from "Du Mouron pour les 
petits oiseaux," "Fort du Fou," 
"Le Meurtricr," "Tempo di 
Roma," "Mathias Sandorf" and 
"Le Vice et la Vertu." 

Disk News 

Pathe Marconi is evidently 
trying to strengthen its jazz cata- 
log. Latest releases that have 
benefited from a strong promo- 
tional campaign are sets by 
Nancy Wilson and Cannonball 
Adderley, Duke Ellington, Slide 
Hampton and Lou Rawls with 
Les McCann, Ltd. A Charlie 
Rouse album will be issued 
when he plays his Paris concert. 



MARCH 23. 1963 



BILLBOARD 29 



Thanks, Steve Allen, 
for Making My Single, 
"Gravy Waltz" (5-9576), 
Such a Smash Hit 



Thanks, DJ's, for All the 
Sensational Air Play on 
"So Much Love in My Heart" c/w 
"Brand New Man" (5-9575) 





fEPIC J 



g"EPIC". Marca Ref. T.M. POINTED IN U.S.A. 




Ariola lines Up 
lor en, Dietrich 

By JIMMY JUNGERMANN 
102 Ismaninger St., Munich 27 

Ariola boss Rolf Engleder took 
another important step towards 
an international catalog when 
he signed Marlene Dietrich and 
Sophia Loren. One of Ger- 
many's top record producers 
Nils Nobach will make their 
records as well as the disks of 
French singers Dalida and 
Charles Aznavour, Swedish 
singer Zarah Leander, Greek 
singer Jimmy Makulis, German 
singer Wolfgang Sauer, and 
Spanish singer Jose Guardiola. 
Visitors 

U. S. pianists Josette and 
Yverte Roman guest starred in 
a concert of the Bavarian Radio 
Network in Munich. The Roman 
Sisters continue their European 
trip with visits and concerts in 
Poland, Roumania, England, 
Norway and Holland. . . . Radio 
Luxenbourg's dee jay Camillo 
Felgen visited Munich. . . . 
Paris deejay Bob Astor visited 
Munich to record shows for the 
Bavarian Radio Network. . . . 
Jim Carter and his Texas 
Rangers recorded in Munich 
"Arizona Train" and "Steel 
Guitar Boogie" for Metronome. 
Mai Son dock produced. 

Rudolf Scli.uk, now on the 
Ariola label, tours the States 
to sing in Carnegie Hall, in 
Philadelphia, and in Toronto. 
He is accompanied by another 
popular singer, A n n e 1 i e s e 
Rothenberger. 

East of the Wall 

The East German Amiga label 



offers this month an album by 
the Jazz Optimists and a George 
Gershwin album by the Radio 
Symphony and the Radio Dance 
Orchestras of Radio Leipzig, 
East Germany, conducted by 
Herbert Kegel. 



Tour Has World 
Music Conception 

By JIMMY JUNGERMANN 
102 Ismaninger St., Munich 27 

Next week the new Polydor 
tour will start, featuring U. S. 
singer Cus Backus, Italian sing- 
er Tony Dallara, Belgian singer 
and emsee Lou Van Burg, Bel- 
gian singer Angele Durand, 
South American singer Carlos 
Otero, German singers Trade 
Herr, Will Brandes, Ted Herald, 
and Austrian singer Paul Hoer- 
biger. 

British singer Billy Sanders 

guest stars at the night spot 
Kaskade in Cologne. . . . Albert 
Corte from Argentine guest 
stars in Chris Howland's TV 
show "Studio B." . . . The vocal 
group Medium Terzett will guest 
star on board of the liner United 
States, and in U. S. TV pro- 
grams. . . . Rene Carol will start 
a tour through the States in May. 

Eydie Corme has been a spe- 
cial favorite among Bavarian 
listeners and she has another 
hit, "Blame It on the Bossa 
Nova," in Germany. AFN in 
Munich plays the record inces- 
santly. Importer Bernhard Mi- 
kulski sent the complete album 
to the Bavarian Radio Network. 

Tenor John Moulson of At- 
lanta, and soprano Ella Lee of 
Los Angeles, are singing at the 
East Berlin Comic Opera. They 
work under one of the foremost 
dramatists of the time, Waller 



Felsenstein. A third American, 
baritone William Ray, who is a 
regular member of the opera 
company at Stuttgart in West 
Germany, sings as a guest at the 
Comic Opera in East Berlin. 



JAPAN 



Nippon Columbia 
Has Miller Line 

By J. FUKUNISHI 
108 Kakinoki/aka, Meguroku, 
Tokyo 

T. Seya, president, and S. Ito, 
managing director, of Nippon 
Columbia left for Okinawa 
March 1, accompanied by sev- 
eral artists and musicians to 
present a special show in cele- 
bration of the recent establish- 
ment of Okinawa Columbia 
Sales Company. Nippon Colum- 
bia also finalized a deal with 
Miller International and is now 
preparing to release the Stereo- 
Fidelity label in May under the 
logo of Columbia International. 

Concert Hall Society Record 
Club disclosed that its member- 
ship reached the 275,000 mark 
February 10 and is expected to 
exceed 300,000 by the end of 
March. 

The total number of records 
issued during 1962 was 8,627, 
which indicates an increase of 
41 per cent over the previous 
year's 6,097. This figure involves 
3,253 Japanese and 5,374 for- 
eign disks. The ratio of increase 
of Japanese platters is 30 per 
cent, while that of foreign is 
50 per cent. In the category of 
stereo LP's, foreign stereos 
show an increase of 44 per cent. 



and Japanese 14 per cent in 
comparison with 1962. 

Caterina Valente arrives April 
10. . . . Charlie Ishiguro and 
his Tokyo Panchos and Lilio 
Rhythm Airs, a chorus group 
are to support her performances 
here. ... I Musici was booked 
to give 12 concerts, starting 
March 28 under the sponsorship 
of Nippon Victor, which presses 
Philips. . . . Victor worked out 
a plan to give away a 7-inch 
compact stereo of this string en- 
semble to every fifth audience 
of its concert series through 
lottery drawings. George Shear- 
ing's troupe of 10 members, in- 
cluding Ann Richards, arrived 
March 8. Capitol is releasing 
two LP's cut by his combo. . . . 
Julius Katchen, American pian- 
ist of London Records, arrives 
March 15 by way of Australia 
to give a series of concerts from 
March 25 to April 1 1 in cele- 
bration of the 10th anniversary 
of London label in Japan. 

Rlchardo Odonoposof, exclu- 
sive violinist to Concert Hall 
Society is set to participate in 
the Osaka International Festival 
in April. The society is issuing 
an LP welcoming his visit. . . . 
Nat King Cole is drawing packed 
audiences singing some selec- 
tions, partly in Japanese, so is 
Toshlko-Mariano Quintet. 



PUERTO RICO 



Top latin Acts 
Delight Tourists 

By ANTONIO CONTRERAS 
26 Gertrudis Street, Santurce 

Puerto Rico's tourist season is 
now in full swing, and local 



hotels and night clubs arc com- 
peting for the best in big time 
attractions. Xavier Cugart and 
Abbe Lane are a success at one 
of the swank tourist hotels, 
while Sonora Matancera (See- 
co label), the oldest and highest 
paid Cuban musical group, is 
doing turn-away business at 
local hotels, night clubs and one- 
night spots. 

This year, in their second visit 
to Puerto Rico, La Sonora 
brought besides its regular sing- 
ers: Celia Cruz, Willy and 
Cello Gonzales and Rolando la 
Serie (Gema label). 

Also in the Latin attraction 
field, we will soon have vocalist 
Roberto Yanes from the Argen- 
tine for the first time. Yanes, 
who has about four LP's in the 
CBS label, all big sellers here. 

Local booker.Tony Chiroldi, 
has a one-hour weekly television 
show sponsored by an auto 
distributor, where he presents all 
the acts that he brings to Puerto 
Rico. He is responsible for the 
Sonora and Yanes appearances. 

Sidney Siegel, president of 
Seeco Records, visited Puerto 
Rico for a short stay with Mrs. 
Siegel and their young daughter. 
Siegel was seen at the opening 
show of Seeco's biggest attrac- 
tion, Sonora Matancera, 15 
years with the label and with 
about 15 LP's in the catalog. 
New releases on Seeco include 
sets by Celia Cruz, Afredo 
Sadel, Joe Cuba Sextet, Adilla 
Castillo, Los Riverenos and a 
bossa nova album recorded in 
Brazil. 

♦ * * 

Editor note: Many executives 
of recording companies do visit 
Puerto Rico about this time of 
the year. If their publicity de- 
partments would only notify this 
writer in advance, 1 could report 
their visits and comments. 

(Continued on page 36) 



APRIL VERSE 

TO FILL YOUR PURSE 

Atkins, Addeo, Strings and Shaw, 
All fine names on which to draw. 

Stock 9 em, stack 9 em, rack' em all 
And all through April have a ball. 



CHET 

CATKINS 
Tur nuiTAi 



THE GUITAR /GENIUS - 1 





LEO ADDEO 

and His 
Orchestra 

ON THE 

SUNNY SIDE 
OF THE 

STREET 



Great Atkins album ! Chet with inimitable guitar . . . and 
big-brother Jim singing smooth baritone. "Swanee 
River," "Heartbreak Hotel," 8 others. CAL/CAS-753 



Addeo and orchestra give big sound to sunny favorites. 
"You Are My Sunshine," "On the Sunny Side of the 
Street," "Island in the Sun," 7 more. CAL/CAS-758 



(^SJam'6en) 




artie shaw 

and his orchestra 



fjigjAMUEN) 




The Living Strings have never been so varied, so lovely. Original performances by an all-time great in the "Big 
Lush orchestral background. "I Concentrate on You," Band" era! Title theme, "Confessin'," "Gloomy Sun- 
"Whispering," "Twilight Time," 7 more. CAL/CAS-755 day," "Day In, Day Out," 6 other big ones! CAL-584 

AMERICA'S BIGGEST ENTERTAINMENT VALUE 

RCA CAMDEN RECORDS 




Copyrighted material 




U1¥T REVIEWS 



Billboard 




Pop LP Spotlights or« those 
albums with sufficient sales 
potential, in the opinion of 
Billboard's Review Panel, to 
achieve a listing on Bill- 
board's Top LP's charts. Spot- 
light winners in other cate- 
gories are selected on the 
basis of their potential to 
become top sellers in their 
respective areas. 



POP SPOTLIGHT 
DON'T LET ME CROSS OVER 
Carl Butler. Columbia CL 2002 
(M); CS B802 (S) 
Carl Butler, an established country chart- 
maker, has broken solidly into the pop 
field recently, with the title tune here. Also 
included are a flock of solid, traditional- 
styled country balled* token at e slow 
and a medium clip. Lots of fine Nashville 
backings are also spotlighted, on such tunes 
as "River of Tears," "I Know What It 
Means to Be Lonesome" and "Grief in My 
Heart." 



DON T LET ME 



CARL BUTLER 



POP SPOTLIGHT 
TWISTING THE JUG 

Gene Ammoni 
Prestige PR 7238 



Gene Ammons, the tenor sax star currently 
on top with the bossa nova LP, teams with 
organist Jack McDuff and trumpeter Joe 
Newman for a swinging set that could get 
stiff iaxi, r.&b. and pop action. The album 
features solid tenor sax and organ duets 
with that walking, rocking tempo that's 
become so popular. "Twisting the Jug," 
"Moten Swing" and "Stormy Monday Blues" 
are solid tracks. 



POP SPOTLIGHT 
TOg)* I WANNA BE AROUND 

Tony Bennett. Columbia CL 
2000 (M),- CS 8800 (S) 
Tony Bennett h«s followed "Sen Francisco" 
with another sizable hit in "I Wanna Be 
Around," which becomes the title tune for 
this album. There are a flock of strong 
efforts, both with big ork as well as with 
Ralph Sharon's combo, and Tony sings 'em 
all with the great heart and warmth. Better 
tracks include "The Good Life," "It Was 
Me," "If You Were Mine" and "I've Got 
Your Number." 




POP SPOTLIGHT 
iraf OUR WINTER LOVE 

TT Bill Porsoll. Columbia CL 1992 
(M); CS 8792 (S) 
The magic of the Pursell piano Is every- 
where evident on this LP. The music is 
soft and at points there's a touch of a 
beat. The hit, of course, is included and 
a flock of other fine tunes, most of them 
of country origin. "Four Walls," "A Wound 
That Time Can't Erase" and "Stranger" are 
just a few of the fine tracks. 



Of ft? HiVTUH i,OU 

ittt i. m rnsvLL 





POP SPOTLIGHT 
LET'S LIMBO SOME MORE 

Chubby Checker. Parkway P 
7027 (M); SP 7027 (S) 
Chubby Checker has hit repeatedly with his 
series of dance-based albums in the las* 
year and here's another to |oin the parade. 
It's the follow-up to his first limbo album, 
and it contains the title tune (a current 
hit) plus "Manene," "Cindy Oh Cindy," 
"Twenty Miles Limbo" and others. Lots of 
solid material here. 



POP SPOTLIGHT 
THE BARBARA STREISAND 
ALBUM 

Columbia CL 2007 (M) ; 
CS 8807 {S> 
Barbra Streisand has a most persuessive 
album here thai should draw an enormous 
amount of play from the jocks on the good 
music stations, The set is loaded with 
standard goodies sung in a mosr dramatic 
fashion. Those same jocks are going to 
go for the Streisand slow ballad version of 
'Happy Days Are Here Again" as well as 
many of the other tracks. 



_ POP SPOTLIGHT 
RUBY BABY 

^f? Dion. Columbio CL 2010 (M); 
CS B810 (S) 
The wild, hard-rocking Oion has enjoyed 
a smash with his first Columbia single. 
Inside the set are a flock of great sides 
both uptempo and more relaxed. He even 
does a moderately soft, "the End of 
the World," Skeet :t Oavis' current hit 
Very much in the traditional Dion groove 
are "Gonna Make It Alone" and "Will Love 
Ever Come My Way," and he does a stand- 
out job on the old Jolson hit, "My Mammy." 



—The 

End«h» 
World 




POP SPOTLIGHT 
THE END OF THE WORLD 

Skeeter Davis. RCA Victor LPM 
2699 [M)j LSP 2699 (S> 
Skeeter's biggest previous pop entry was 
an answer song, hut now she's made it 
big with her own original hit, "The End 
of the World." It's close to the top of 
most charts rioht now and this album, 
bearing the same title, should have maxi- 
mum impac*. Among the better outings are 
"Mine Is a Lonely Life," "Why I'm 
Walkin'," "He Called Me Baby" and "My 
Coloring Book." 



— <2 1 STEREO 35 M 


* 


ENOCH LIGHT 


COLORING FOOK 


*• 

* 


r ^ 




,_ POP 


SPOTLIGHT 





MY MUSICAL COLORING 
BOOK 

Enoch Light & His Ork 
Command RS848SD (S 

A fine Instrumental collection by the Enoch 
light band, with sparkling orchestrations 
an outstanding aspect. The selections all 
have some aspect of color in their titles, 
as with "Yellow Bird," "Ruby," "Green 
Eyes," "Blue Room," "Deep Purple," etc. 
The placement of the instrumental choirs 
emphasizes the stereo effect, of course, 
in a highly commercial manner, 



POP SPOTLIGHT 
SHUTTERS AND BOARDS 

J' Jerry Wallace 

Challenge CH 616 

The title tune of this album was a bis 
one a short while ago for the singer and 
its teamed with some other fine tracks bv 
the lad. One of them, "Primrose Lane," 
was an earlier hit. Material is bound to go 
both country and pop with such tracks as 
"There She Goes," "Am I That Easy to 
Forget" and "Angel on My Shoulder" cover- 
ing either or both sides. 



POP SPOTLIGHT 

SURFERS' CHOICE 
| Dick Dole & the Doltonei 

Capitol DT 1886 
Dale has picked up Impressive power since 
being distributed by Capitol Records. The 
album should prove a big seller on the 
West Coast and there's a good chance thai 
the sales will spread nationwide now. All 
the best selling Oale singles are in this 
album, "Peppermint Man," "Surfing Drums," 
"Surf Beat" and "Mlserlou Twist" among 
them. 



y^. POP SPOTLIGHT 
•fe^" MILLION SELLERS 
T DANCE HITS 

Various Artists. Parkway 7028 
Here's a hit package that's bound to get 
plenty of calls. It puis on one LP the big 
hits of the past year with "Let's Twist 
Again" by Chubby Checker, "Mashed Potato 
Time" by Dee Dee Sharp, and a flock of 
others by Bobby Rydell, the Orlons and the 
Dcvells. It's a winner. 



POP SPOTLIGHT 
THAT STUBBORN KINDA' 
FELLOW 

Marvin Goye. Tamla TM 239 
This album features Gaye the singer who 
scored with the lille tune and "Hitch 
Hike" on the singles front. There's a good 
chance that this album could pull more 
sales tor the artist from the same kind of 
audience. It's loaded with teen delights 
as far as the dance tempi and sound are 
concerned. Besides the hits "Soldier's Plea," 
"It Hurt Me Too" and "Taking My Time" 
are tops. 



THAT STUBBORN KINDA FELLOW 




MITCH MIKE 

SOI.MKK'S Pl.KA 

IM YOURS YOU RE NINE 
t HO THERE ANGEL 
BH MY HANDS ON 
SDMI 10 VIM 

i vkim; my time 

PRIDE AND JOY 
■RCIEVE1 1 LAV MT Ml 
IT HURT ME TOO 



POP SPOTLIGHT 

BLAME IT ON THE BOSSA 

NOVA 



Eydie Gorme. Columbia CL 
2012 [M ; CS 8812 (S) 
Eydie has her biggest single right now, 
Columbia hat found a solid niche for the 
gel with the bossa nova groove and her 
current hit, the title tune, sets off a whole 
program of the same basic insinuating 
rhythm. Her fans (including jocks aplenty) 
should dig "The Sweetest Sounds," "One 
Note Samba," "Melody d'Amour" and "Moon 
River." 



BLAME IT ON THE BOSSA NQVfl 

Eydie Gorme 



A. 



L 



. „«v\ nwnn 




• ?» :?i ? » p sflirtti scon 



jazz premiere: 

THE PAUL WINTER SEXTET 


1 




J 










II 




1 




* 





POP SPOTLIGHT 
SING ALONG WITH JFK 
LAUGH ALONG WITH NIXON 

Original Cast. Peprise R 6083 
Here comes another album that good- 
naturedly spoofs the President and hit 
manner of speaking. This is one of the 
most authentic disks to come along as yet. 
however, for the actual voices of Kennedy, 
Nixon and Eisenhower are included on this 
gag-filled sing-along disk- The majority 
of the tracks are made up of out-of-context 
excerpts from Presidential messages which 
have been orchestrated for sing-along cfcorm 



_ POP SPOTLIGHT 
•{(Sj' THIS IS MY COUNTRY 

Mormon Tabernacle Choir 
r Columbia ML 5819 (M); 

MS 6419 (S) 
The huge Mormon Choir is always to be 
reckoned with as a solid seller, and this 
newest package contains the kind of ma- 
terial that's bound to be sure-fire sales 
fodder. It's packed with patriotic material 
such as "The Star-Spangled Banner," "This 
Is My Country," "Finlandia," "The Maple 
Leaf Forever" (the Canadian national an- 
them), "The Marseillaise" and others. 



POP SPOTLIGHT 
FOLK SONGS FROM THE HILLS 
The Springfield*. Philips PHN 
200-076 (M); PHS 600-076 (S) 
The British folk trio has clicked here with 
at least one single, "Silver Threads and 
Golden Needles," and has other album of- 
ferings, This set, however, marks thtir 
debut U. S. recording, and it was done in 
Nashville to the sparkling, banio-filled ar- 
rangements of Bill Justis. Group has a tre- 
mendously infectious sound on such ditties 
as "Greenback Dollar," "Settle Down," 
"Midnight Special" and "Cotton Fields." 



JAZZ SPOTLIGHT 

t©r MISTY 

I Eddie (Lockjaw) Davis with 

Shirley Scott 

Moodsville MV 30 
Shirley Scott and Eddie Davis, always a po- 
tent team on the Prestige label, swing 
again in the old groove, reunited after 
Eddie's return to the stable on the Moods- 
ville subsid. The sound is tight and soul- 
ful; the music, for the most part, has a 
light easy swing with "1 Wished on the 
Moon," "Misty," "Just Friends" and "Speak 
Ldw. 



JAIL SPUILIOHI 
JAZZ PREMIERE: 
WASHINGTON 



Paul Winters Sextet. Columbia 
CL 1997 (M), CS 8797 (S) 
Winters and group scored so powerfully 
with their first album, a bossa nova set, 
that this LP Is bound to rack up potent 
sales. The tracks are in the modern idiom 
with strong blowing from Winters himself 
on alto and Warren Bernhardt, piano; Dick 
Whitsell, trumpet, and Les Rout, baritone. 
"Shenandoah," "Count Me In" and "The 
Thumper," are some of the better tracks. 




Billboard 




Pop LP Spotlights are those 
albums with sufficient sales 
potential, in the opinion of 
Billboard's Review Panel, to 
achieve a listing on Bill- 
board's Top LP's charts. Spot- 
light winners in other cate- 
gories are selected on the 
basis of their potential to 
become top sellers in their 
respective areas. 




t 



„„S(>IM). 

GENIUS 




CLASSICAL SPOTLIGHT 
THE SOUND OF GENIUS 

(7-12") 
Various Artists. Columbia 
SGM 1 (M); SGS 1 (S) 

A tremendous collection of classical stand- 
outs on these two LP's, in a package thai 
spotlights Columbia's vast stable of artists 
handsomely. Included are such as Bern- 
stein, Casadesus, Francescatti, Siell, Walter. 
Stravinsky, Stern, Serkin, Casals, Gou|d, 
Ormandy and many other greats. Also in- 
cluded in the package is a 16-page booklet 
on how to build a classical library. 




FOLK SPOTLIGHT 
LYNN GOLD 

Warner Bros. W U93 (M); 
WS 1495 (S) 
Miss Gold Is a young lady with a striking, 
haunting soprano voice, attuned not to 
opera, operetta or the lieder song, but 
strictly to the folk idiom. Accompanying 
herself on guitar (with no further support) 
she offers a host of songs, many with an 
old world flavor and many too with a sort 
of wistful lover touch. An interesting saga 
piece (and one of the few not arranged 
by the songstress herself) <i "Plane Wreck 
at Los Gatos." The girl is well known along 
the folk c'ub circuit and this initial re- 
cording can bring many more friends to the 
fold. 





CLASSICAL SPOTLIGHT 

SHOWPIECES FOR THE 
VIRTUOSO ORCHESTRA 

Clevelond Orchestra (Szell) 
Epic SPM 1 (M); SPS 1 (S) 



Here's a fine piece of specially priced mer- 
chandise which elegantly showcases ihe 
Cleveland ork and its renowned conductor, 
George Szell (who is also celebrating his 
Golden Anniversary on Ihe podium). Works 
of Tchaikovsky, Wagner, Richard Strauss, 
Johann Strauss II, Mendelssohn and Stra- 
vinsky are included. The package, pegged 
at $1.98 for both stereo and mono, should 
be a hefty seller and will enjoy big pro- 
motion. 



RHYTHM & BLUES SPOTLIGHT 

BOSSA NOVA t BLUES 

Freddy King. King 821 

Here's a mighty potent package that could 
not only score in the r.&b market, but 
could move right across into the pop chart. 
The album features King's great blues 
singing and guitar work on such items as 
"(I'd Love to) Make Love to You" (current 
r.&b. hit), "The Bossa Nova Watusi Twist," 
"IS My Baby Mad at Me." "The Welfare," 
"One Hundred Years," end "Bossa Nova 
Blues." 




CLASSICAL SPOTLIGHT 
SCHUBERT: SYMPHONY NO. B 
IN B MINOR; SYMPHONY NO. 
3 IN D 

Pittsburgh Symphony Orches- 
tra (Steinberg). Command CC 
11017 (M); CC 11017 SD (S) 



The great Unfinished Symphony is played 
masterfully on this LP by Steinberg and 
the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. The al- 
bum should move along impressively. Stein- 
berg and the orchestra have been most suc- 
cessful since coming to Command, and this 
set should only add to their laurels. 



Josh 
■,. White 



— FOLK SPOTLIGHT 

T^Sf THE BEGINNING 

HP Josh White. Mercury MG 
60724 (M); SR 60724 (S) 
Josh White remains a great force in the 
folk movement with his authentic, tradi- 
tional folk blues sound. This brand-new 
package, recorded earlier this year, In- 
corporates recuttings of some of the earliest 
7B r.p.m. recordings made by White In 
the mid and late '20's. "In the Evening," 
"Howlin' Wolf," "My Fatner Is a Husband 
Man," and "Blues Comes From Texas," are 
samples of the fare. The more exciting 
rough quality of the original waxings is 
absent and replaced by a more refined, ur- 
banish touch, but fans and collectors will 
dig iust the some. 




POLKA SPOTLIGHT 

SPIEWAJCIE ZEMNA SING 
WITH ME ~3 





— CLASSICAL SPOTLIGHT 

fe^T THE EXCITING DEBUT OF 
1* ANDRE WATTS 

With New York Philharmonic 
(Bernstein). Columbia ML 5858 
(M); MS 6458 (S) 
Fresh young talent is the lifeblood of the 
record business and Columbia has a hot 
one in 16-year-old Andre Watts, who shot 
to fame via a TV appearance on Leonard 
Bernstein's TV concert and then filled in 
for ailing Glenn Gould at the Philharmonic 
concert. Here, playing the same Liszt 
concerto with the same orchestra, his skil 
and aplomb are apparent. The national 
furor also makes this a strong item for 
fast sales. 



SONGS AND DANCES OF 7~ 

AT IN AM RI A 



U'l w C] ||y. Joy Joy 1056 
Just the thing for the polka dancing, Polish- 
speaking fans of this impressive purveyor 
of the big polka beat. The album features 
fine hopping music and something to sing 
along with as well. Group singing of the 
disk and handy song sheet included with 
the album all make for a grand polka 
package. 




LATIN AMERICAN SPOTLIGHT 
SONGS AND DANCES OF 
LATIN AMERICA 
Luis Alberto Del Parana & the 
Trio Los Paraguayos 
Philips PHM 200-067 (M); 
PHS 600-067 (S) 
This group Is well known in Spanish neigh- 
borhoods with a feeling for the music of 
South America. The singing group is witty, 
wise and winning. It caries off its ma- 
terial with dash and the inbred romantic 
quality expected of typical Spanish singing. 
One to stock moderately in Latin American 
neighborhoods. 




BAND SPOTLIGHT 



S/s MANCINI MARCHES 

Henry Mancini Conducting 
Warner Bros. Band 
Warner Bros. W 1491 (M); 
WS 1491 {S) 

This is a reissue, but since the original 
release a few years ago, Henry Mancini has 
become a national figure, thanks to his 
award-winning efforts in films and TV. As a 
result, the LP now has a glamor that was 
lacking earlier. Stirring renditions of famed 
marches are always salable, and Ihis LP 
has them, from Sousa through "Ths Bill- 
board" to "Colonel Bogey." A band fan's 
delight. (Best track: "The Billboard March") 




THE ORIGINAL SOUND 

Letter Flatt & Eorl Scruggs 
Mercury MG 20773 (M); 
SR 60773 (S) 



The famed bluegrass team is presented in 
reprocessed stereo, featuring sides first 
recorded in 194B, 1949 and 1951. Lester 
Flatl's country-style singing and the fan- 
tastic virtuosity of Earl Scruggs on ban|0 
are a byword by now. They are given full 
opportunities for exposure on such Hems 
as "Why Don't You Tell Me So," "(toll In 
My Sweet Baby's Arms" and "Foggy Moun- 
tain Breakdown." 




PAGE 
ONE 
'ALBUMS' 



* NATIONAL BREAKOUTS 

MONO 

THE HAPPY BEAT . . . 

Bay Connifl. His Ork & Chorus, Columbia CI 1949 

RUBY BABY . . . 

Dion, Columbia CI 2010 

STEREO 

OUR MAN IN BOSTON ... 

Arthur Fiedler & Ihe Boston Pops. RCA Victor LSC 2599 

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA . . . 

Sound Track, Colplx SCP 514 

OUR MAN IN NEW ORLEANS ... 

Al Hirt. RCA Victor ISP 2607 

★ NEW ACTION IP's 

These new albums, not yet on Billboard's 
Top LP's Chart, have been reported getting 
strong sales action by dealers in major mar- 
kets. 



MONO 



JUST TURN ME LOOSE . . . 
George Maharis, Epic LH 24037 

EDDIE FISHER AT THE 
WINTER GARDEN . . . 

Ramrod RR 1 

PORTRAIT OF MARTY . . . 

Marty Robbins. Columbia CI 1855 

HAIL THE CONQUERING HERO . . . 
Peter Hero, RCA Victor 1PM 2638 

ITS UR TO YOU . . . 

Rick Nelson, Imperial LP 9223 

LETS LIMN SOME MORE . . . 

Chubby Checker, Parkway P 7027 

JAZZ WORKSHOP REVISITED . . . 
Cannonball Adderley Seitet. 
Riverside RM 444 

THE KEYS TO HER APARTMENT . . 

Ferranle & Teicher. United Artists 
UAL 3247 

THE NIGHT HAS A THOUSAND EYES . 

Bobby Vee, Liberty LRP 3285 

I WISH YOU LOVE . . . 

Arthur Lyman, Hi-Fi L 1009 



FOLLOW THE BOYS .. . 

Connie Francis, MGM E 4123 

MIDNIGHT SUN . . . 

Earl Grant. Decca DL 4338 

STEVE ALIEN PLAYS 

BOSSA NOVA JAZZ . . . 
Dot DLP 3480 

ALL THE HITS— VOLUME 1 . . . 
Dee Doe Sharp, Cameo C 1032 

HARD TRAVaiN' . . . 

Lester Flail 1 Earl Scruggs, . 
Columbia CL 1951 

STEREO 

BACK AT THE CHICKEN SHACK . . . 

Ilmmy Smith, Blue Note BST8-4I17 

ARRIVEDERCI, ROMA . . . 
Jerry Vale, Columbia CS 8755 

ALL ALONE AM I . . . 
Bremta Lee, Decca DL 74370 

STEVE LAWRENCE WINNERS . . . 

Columbia CS 8753 

PAUL AND PAULA SING FOR 
YOUNG LOVERS . . . 

Philips, PHS 600078 




SPECIAL MERIT PICKS 

Special Merit Picks are new releases ?' <wmand.ng 
merit which deserve exposure and which cou d have 
commercial success within their respect.ve categor.es 
of music - 



Qgiy POP SPECIAL MERIT 

RIVERWIND 

Original Cast 

London AM 48001 (M>; AMS 78001 (S) 
The original caster of this Off-Broadway 
musical, features pleasing melod.es and 
literate adult lyrics, both the product of 
Paul Jennings. The show got nearly uni- 
versally goo3 reviews, and the score proves 
to be a major pleasure. Show album col- 
lectors should be pointed this way. 



POP SPECIAL MERIT 

THE 1963 SOUND OF HANK BALLARD 
& THE MIDNIGHTERS 

King 815 

This is Ballard's best album in some time. 
The set has a strong dance beat throughout 
and the material is once again oriented 
for a new generation of teens. The Ham- 
mond organ work end solid dance beat 
could get Hank up into the big chart 
category again. "Or. Lover," "House on the 
Hill," "Watcha Gonna Do" and WalKW and 
Talkin' " are potent. 



POP SPECIAL MERIT 

THE THREE SOUNDS PLAY JAZZ ON 
BROADWAY 

Mercury MG 20776 (M); SR 60776 (S) 
The Three Sounds, long-time winners on 
an independent j«zz label, have a superior 
set of performances here. The material, ell 
drawn from current Broadway successes, is 
perfect for the group's interpretation^ 
Members of the trio, especially pMnW 
Gene Harris, have also put some thought 
into the use of the tunes included and pro- 
vocative versions of "Gonna Build a Mown- 
tain," "Sweetest Sounds," and others re- 
sult. 



Qjjp POP SPECIAL MERIT 

MY SON THE COPY CAT 

Stan Ross. Del-Fi DFLP 1233 

This album is in the same groove as the 
Allan Sherman set and Ross and the cast 
make no bones about it. The parody and 
satire songs, sung to familiar melodies. Pret- 
ty nutty stuff with the "Inlaw Song, 
'Xhinese Sunday Dinner" and "My School 
Days" hit the mark pretty well. Chorus, 
ork and audience all add to the gaiety. 



STEREO 

'360 SOUND' 





HEADS YOU WIN 
TAILS YOU WIN 



CL 2000/CS 8800" 





TONY 
BENNETT 
I wanna 
be 

around... 



TKZ GOOD LI FX (Pros the Film 

•The Sevan Capital Sine*) 

17 I LOVB AG A IB 

I ■ ANSA BI AROUSD 

I'VE GOT XOim MUMBSH (Tron the 

Broadway Production "Little He") 

uvtil i or you 

(With Ralph Sharon Trio) 
LET'S FACE THE MUSIC ASD DAHCE 
{With Ralph Sharon Trio] 

OHCK UPOH A SUMMERTIME 

it you mkkk mm 

I ITU LIVE MY Lin TOR YOU 
SOKEOHE TO LOVE 
IT WAS KB 

qUIBT EIGHTS (Corcovado) 
Produced by Ernie AltectaiUer 



DOUBLE the TAKE 
with Tony's latest album 



The fabulous follow-up to 




it 


find 

CL 


869/CS 8669 


COLUMBIA RECORDS • 



Publicity: Mai Braveman/ Promotion: Joe Petralia 



Billboard 







FOR WEEK 
ENDING 
MARCH 23 



SIM PERFOBHERi — ulactiwi) M Chtrt 9 wMki or lass rtgliltrhg grtAltst upward progrtu thli wm«. 



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150 

UK Wfci an 

Wctk TIM*. Ait it, Labal Chart 
I SOUS I line OK THE 

JACKIE 6LEAJON SHOW 7 

Frnnb Fanrr.nr ABC-Pararnaunt A4C 441 

5 WIST SIDE SINT 74 

SoanB Trntk. Caluarbla 01 3470 

J H0VIK6 10 

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36 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 



International News 



Continued from page 29 



ITALY 



Ri-Fi Adds New 
Golden Voices 

By SAMUEL STEINMAN 
Piazza S. Anselmo 1, Rome 

Ri-Fi finds itself with sudden 
riches in top voices. In addition 
to marketing Aurelio Ficrro's 
new King label, it has two of 
the top artists of San Remo, 
Cock) Mazzetti and Eugenia 
Filigatti, the latter the out- 
standing new voice of the year. 

Although the carnival season 
is over, Columbia has thought 
of putting its spirit on a disk 
with "Carnival at Home" featur- 
ing four top vocalists and four 
instrumental groups. . . . Philips 
is sponsoring the four-month 
European tour of South Amer- 
ica's Al Korvin and U.S.A.'s 
Cat Barber, beginning with a 
Milan appearance and proceed- 
ing into Yugoslavia, Germany 
and Scandinavia. . . . O. S. Bossa 
Nova with the voice of Au- 



gusthino is the Brazilian group 
being introduced here by Fonit. 

Vis-Rario has come forth with 
22 old Claudia Villa disks which 
have been reissued simultane- 
ously. A new Italian group on 
same label is called the Little 
Boys. . . . New TV light music 
shows will include "Jazz Gal- 
lery" featuring Zoot Sims, Les 
McCann, Charlie Byrti. Oscar 
lein and others and four-part 
Line Renaud show with Renato 
Carosone making a comeback as 
a special guest. 

With announcement of the new 
Cantagiro, musical tour of Italy 
with 1 1 singing stops culmina- 
ting at Fiuggi, June 22-July 5, 
the talent discovery of last 
year's event, Donatella Morefti, 
has come along with a new 
RCA disk, "Until the End" by 
Joaquin Prieto, author of last 
year's top hit, "The Bride." . . . 
Although the Melodicon label 
will continue, the company's 
name will hereafter be Phono- 
gram. Principal disks are those 
of Philips. . . . Fausto Leali, 
who shared time with Ben E. 
King on his TV special, has come 
along with "A Kiss and Then" 
and "We Play at Love" for 



Menuhin Concert 
Scores as Solo 

Yehudi Menuhin, the world- 
famous violinist, scored one of 
his most impressive triumphs in 
Tel Aviv last week. The violin 
recital composed of solo works 
(without accompaniment), was 
played to a packed house of 
3,000 at the Mann Auditorium. 



Saar which is also featuring 
Petula Clark's "Chariot." 

Rino Loddo is back on the 
Italo scene after two years in 
South America. ... I Musici 
won top place in the First In- 
ternational Disc Festival at Mar 
del Plata, Argentina. . . . Latest 
festival-winning song is "I Won't 
Do It Again" by Desimone and 
Capotosti which won the Golden 
Sequin at Bologna's Festival of 
five years old. 

Ella Fitzgerald has come out 
with two Verve LP's entitled 
'The Harold Arlen Song Book." 
"Sinatra and Basic" is the latest 
Reprise record. . . . Liberty is the 
latest in the bossa nova sweep- 
stakes with Si Zcntner play- 
ing "Desafinado." . . . Columbia 
has brought together France's 
top artists, Edith Piaf, Gilbert 
Becaud, Richard Anthony, Fran 




CLICK GO THE SHEARS, BOYS 

CLICK I 

CLICK! 
CLICK! 



E.M.I, really clicks in Australia! 
From folk music to grand opera and the twist, 
Australians have a wide musical taste — 
and with the taste, 
an enthusiastic appreciation of recorded entertainment. 

E.M.I, has a most active distribution outlet in 
E.M.I. (Australia) Ltd., Sydney, 
and with it a recording and manufacturing outfit 
that is equal to the best in the world. 
The photograph below shows 
the recently completed E.M.I, factory near Sydney. 
We built this factory to keep in step 
with the tremendous growth in Australian record demand. 

You'd be impressed to know how many of the records we sell 
consist of American repertoire. 



So goes the pattern of E.M.I.'s record business all over the world. 
That is why E.M.I, records are being pressed today in 40 different countries, 
and one record in every four sold throughout the world (outside the Communist bloc) 

is made by E.M.I. 




Pourcel, Les Chats Sauvages 
and Theo Sarapo in an LP 

entitled "From a Juke Box 
Along the Seine." 

Only vocal LP of the festival 
has been issued by Cetra with 
voices of Claudia Villa, Milva 
and Tonina Torielli. . . . Sinatra 
war continues with records com- 
ing from Reprise and Capitol. 
At the moment the latter's al- 
bums are "The Best of Sinatra," 
Vols. 1 and 2, and "Sinatra 
Sings." 

RCA Italiana and Paramount 
will promote "Girls, Girls, 
Girls," known in Italy as "100 
Girls and a Sailor," by allowing 
all moviegoers who attend the 
Elvis Presley film to take their 
dated tickets within 24 hours to 
a record shop where the full ad- 
mission price will be deducted 
from the selling price of the 
album of he film's sound track. 
. . . Having come out with the 
four disks of American jazz in 
the 1920's, Columbia has now 
placed them all in a leather- 
covered album for collectors. 
. . . Tony Rents will sing his 
San Remo-winning song "One 
for All" in a new film about 
military life which DDL will 
make. 




Dance Finn's 
lire in Words 

By LUIS MA. TRINIDAD 
264 Escoha, Manila 

Leading Filipino literary 
works, translated in the dance 
medium and set to locally com- 
posed original music, will high- 
light next year's activities of the 
FEU Modern Experimental 
Dance Group under the direc- 
tion and choreography of Rosa- 
lia Merino-Santos. 

The premiere showing of 
"Binhi Ng Kalayaan," first opera 
on Rizal's life, had been post- 
poned to June 19, the hero's 
birthday. 




Reveal Royalties 
On Lesley Disk 

By ESPEN ERIKSEN 
Verdens Gang, Oslo 

The quarrel between British- 
born pop-singer Lome Lesley 
and her diskery Viking Music 
(which has resulted in Miss Les- 
ley starting her own indie, 
Lorna Records) goes on. In 
answer to her charge that she 
had not received royalties for 
two records issued, the Viking 
diskery answered that the book- 
keeping has just been finished. 
The sum Miss Lesley promised 
to Norway's Red Cross Chil- 
dren's aid — a sum, she said, 
which might reach 10,000 Nor- 
wegian kroner — has been re- 
vealed at N.kr. 262. 

Another foreign artist has left 
the Viking label, American-born 
singer Jack Dalley, who has 
moved to Per Gunnar Jensen's 
Manu label. Dailey reached the 
Norwegian Top 10 last autumn 
with his recording of "No ol, no 
vin, no dram." 

Amateurs 

The amateur contest at the 
municipal non-alcohol serving 
restaurant Rondo has led to the 
discovery of more talent. Norsk 
Phonogram A-S has signed a 
group for its Philips label. The 
group is called the Vikings, and 
Philips has made six recordings. 
None has been issued yet. 

"All Star Festival" has 



reached the top of the Norwe- 
gian LP parade, as compiled by 
the newspaper Arbeiderbladet. 
The record thus dethroned the 
"West Side Story" sound-track 
version on Philips, which is now 
runner-up. Third is the Elvis 
Presley RCA record "Girls! 
Girls! Girls!" 




Market Feels 
trench Impact 

By RAUL MATAS 
32 Avda Jose Antonio 
Madrid 13 

French influence over the 
north of Spain and the south of 
France has been impregnated 
with many new Spanish names, 
titles and hits through radio. 
The tremendous impact Richard 
Anthony made with "J'entend 
sifler Ie train" has prompted 
Spanish renditions of the same 
song. "Quinientas Millas" is its 
name and it now is coming up 
so strongly that even San Rcmo's 
winner "Uno per tutte," by Tony 
Renls, has been stymied. Los 
TNT (Tim Nelly and Tony) 
from Italy (through Uruguay 
and Argentina) headed the 
group of favorites. 

Also coming up strongly is the 
"Limbo Rock" as sung by 
Chubby Checker and the Span- 
ish version made by the Duo 
Dinamico in Buenos Aires. 
"Maria" and "Baby Elephant 
Walk" also seem to be among 
future hits. 

New Releases 

Stateside launched "Loop de 
Loop" by Johnny Thunder. 
Barclay "Preghero" (Stand by 
Me) and "La partida de futbol," 
with Dalida. Paul Anka is also 
making the world go round with 
"Love" (RCA) and Capitol is- 
sued Laurindo Almeida bossa 
nova LP. 




Wax Final Songs 
fn Contest Prep 

By JAN TORFS 
Stuivenbergvaart 37, Mechelen 

All six of the tunes involved 
in the Eurovision Song Belgian 
Finals have been recorded. The 
tunes selected as Belgium's entry 
in the test, "Waarom," by 
Jacques Raymond, Liza Marke's 
"Luister naar de wind" and 
"Saksisch Porcelein" have all 
been issued on Philips. Rina Pia 
waxed "Er speelt een orgel" for 
the Decca label. Jo Lee mans re- 
corded "Zo mooi" for the 
Olympic label and Lieve Olga 
did the same with "Com amore." 
Fifteen of the 16 tunes to be 
presented in the Eurovision con- 
test are now known and only 
the German song has yet to be 
chosen. 

Lac Van Hoesselt wrote two 
new tunes with Benny Welton 
and Roger Danneels called 
"Diep in jouw hart" and "De 
Muur." The second tune, titled 
"The Wall" in English, was in- 
spired by the situation in Berlin. 

"My Fair Lady" is still going 
strong in Antwerp. This week 
the 1 00.000th person saw it It 
will continue to be presented in 
Antwerp until the end of April. 
The whole spectacle will move 
over to Ghent for another two 
months, while during the sum- 
mer holidays, it goes to Ostend 
and then on a tour of Belgium. 

Elvis Presley's latest picture 
here, "Girls, Girls, Girls," will 



MARCH 23, 1963 



BILLBOARD 37 



be released soon. . . . Margot 
Eskens has two new songs 
called "Ich bin wie ein Schiff' 
and "Weisse Orchideen" on 
Polydor. ... At the end of this 
week. Discostar will release the 
new recording by the Swedish 
guitar groups, the Spotnocks, 
called "Hava Nageela." . . . 
Vera Lynn came out with a 
wonderful single, composed of 
different songs sung by the Eng- 
lish troops during World War II. 

Soeur Souire (Sister Smile), 
the Dominican Sister of Fichcr- 
mont near Waterloo in Belgium, 
who made herself an interna- 
tional name through her first 
album, just recorded 10 new 
songs for Philips. These are 
also written by herself and have 
the same freshness and original- 
ity as those of her first record- 
ing. 

Young Belgian singer, Robert 
Cogoi, famous through his first 
single "Si un jour," has waxed 
four new songs for the Philips 
label which came out wonderful- 
ly and no doubt that Robert 
Cogoi has at least one hit among 
them so the future looks rosy 
for him. 

Going up strongly are the 
Rooftop Singers with "Walk 
Right In" on the Fontana label. 

Interesting newcomers this 
week were: "You're the Reason 
I'm Living" by Bobby Darin on 
Capitol, "Hey Paula" by Paul 
and Paula on Philips and "Mary- 
Ann Limbo" by Chubby Check- 
er on Cameo-Parkway. 

Another record of which we 
are expecting very much is "Una 
Noche" by the Trio Venus on 
Delta. The song is no other than 
a Spanish version of "Wonder- 
land by Night," the former hit 




IMPERIAL RECORDS 

642S Hollywood Blvd. 
Hollywood 28. Calif. 



of Bert Kaempfert, hut now 

sung in a very special but out- 
standing style. 

lnterphono (distributors of the 
CBS label in Belgium) is busy 
continuing its campaign in re- 
leasing new records. This week 
was very rich in LP's. Among 
the most interesting were new- 
comers by Ray Conniff, Doris 
Day, Percy Faith, Dave Brubeck 
and Mahalia Jackson. 




Solid Score Run 
Up by Writers 

By ARNE HANSEN, 
11 Malerbakken, Holte. 

The Danish final in the Euro- 
vision song contest became a 
triumph for compose r-band 
leader Otto Francker and writer 
Sejr Vohner Sorensen. This 
team was forced to withdraw 
their "Jeg snakker mcd mig 
selv" (then favorite to first prize) 
from last year's contest, but 
this year they won with "Danse- 
vise," a sort of jazz-oriented 
waltz, presented by husband and 
wife Grcthe and Jorgen Ing- 
mann. Mr. and Mrs. Ingmann 
will present "Dansevise" at the 
European finals in London 
March 23. Beside the Danish 
recording of the tune Grethe and 
Jorgen Ingmann will do a Ger- 
man and an English version as 
well for Metronome Records. 

Writer Volmer Soerensen 
scored a triple victory. He also 
did the lyrics to tune No. 2, 
"Amigamia," composed by Hans 
Schreiber and sung by new- 
comer Bjoern Tidmand, and to 
"Pourquoi?" by Boerge Nord- 
lund which came in No. 3. sung 
by Birthe WUke. 

The "West Side Track" sound 
track on CBS is still heading 
the LP best seller charts, but 
coming up since December is 
a reissue of 16 tracks by Danish 
jazz-pianist Leo Mathiesen and 
his groups from the 1940's. 
Odeon intends to release yet 
another LP of old Mathiesen 
tracks. 




Ready Intensive 
Push lor Madison 

By OTTO MAYER-SERRA 
Apartado 8688, Mexico City 

After having started the rock 
and twist craze here, Rogelio 
Azcarraga, president of Discos 
Mexicanos, is starting a nation- 




GRAMOPHONE 
RECORD 
RETAILERS' 
ASSOCIATION 

1, PECKHAM PARK ROAD 
LONDON. S.E.13. 
ENGLAND. 

1963 CONFERENCE AND EXHIBITION 

April 21 8. 22 
HOTEL NEW AMBASSADORS, 
Upper Woburn Place. W.C.I. 

CONFERENCE APRIL 21ST, GOLD ROOM, II a.m.-6 p.m. 

APRIL 22ND, GOLD ROOM. 10 a.m. -4 p.m. 

EXHIBITION APRIL 2 1ST, SOCIETY SUITE, 10 am 9 p.m. 

APRIL 22ND, SOCIETY SUITE, 10 a.m. 4 p.m. 

ANNUAL DINNER APRIL 22ND, SOCIETY SUITE, COMMENCING AT 8 p.m . 

TRADE INQUIRIES TO: 

H. A. TIPPLE, GENERAL SECRETARY 
GSR A 1, PECKHAM PARK ROAD, LONDON. S.E.15. 
PUBLIC INVITATIONS FROM THEIR LOCAL RECORD STORE. 



wide promotional compaign for 
introducing the madison this 
month. 

Bill Haley, who just received 
the Discos Mexicanos. an award 
for being the campany's best- 
selling artisi with his twisl re- 
cordings, has recorded in the 
Orfeon studios an LP with dif- 
ferent Madison tunes. A single 
with "Travelling West" and 
"Hughs Madison" (from the LP) 
will come out earlier. 

Italian singer Antonio Peri- 
coli, the current best-selling 
artist here ("Al Di La"), ap- 
peared with great success during 
a week in a night club and TV 
programs. . . . The Churumbeles 
of Spain started the recording 
of their fifth LP for RCA Victor 
Mcxicana. . . . The new com- 
pany Discos Universales (Poly- 
dor-Philips) will start operations 
in July. . . . Francisco Cardenas, 
recording manager of RCA 
Victor Mexicano, will attend 
in New York of the recording 
engineers of all (he affiliated 
companies of RCA. On this oc- 
casion the new sound "Dyna- 
groovc" will be demonstrated 
to them. . . . Gamma Record's 



best seller Oscar Madrigal re- 
corded "Walk Right In." 




Talent Flows In, 
Scores Success 

By HENRY FOX 
Kungsgaten 56, Stockholm 

Talcnl is flooding this country 
from all sides. Some 3,000 teen- 
agers stormed the Joey Dee 
show at Royal Tennis Hall. 
Thelonious Monk gave a con- 
cert al Konserthuset wearing a 
fur cap while playing. Due this 
week is Cannonball Adderley, 
who will also have his own TV 
program here produced by Lasse 
Sarri. 

EMI topper Anders Holm- 
stedt returned recently from 
business talks in Finland. He 
noted that Capitol Records has 
had a better year in Sweden 
so far than in any other nation 



in Europe He is also very high 
on "Twisl in Minuett" written 
by Thore Skogman which 
finished No. 3 in the local song 
festival here. Finally, he said 
that EMI would be distributing 
the Blue Note and Artist labels 
formerly handled by Nordiska 
Musikforlaget. 

Laila Halme will represent 
Finland in the London Eurovi- 
sion finals March 23. She has 
recorded one Finnish tune 
"Muistojeni Laulu" for RCA. 
. . . Alice Babs will have a 
dream come true when she re- 
cords with Duke Ellington in 
Paris on the Reprise label. 



NEW YORK — Eddie Sauter, 
Hershy Kay and Sol Kaplan, 
all prominent in the theater, 
motion picture and TV music 
fields, have joined forces in a 
new firm, to be known as the 
Composers Company. The trio 
will create original music for the 
mass entertainment media, for 
industrial presentations and 
broadcast commercials. Group 
will handle music, lyrics, ar- 
ranging and orchestration. 



r 



INTERNATIONAL 



3 



A convenient international directory of companies now offering their experience, facilities and services 
for the sale, distribution, exploitation or manufacture of products in tho music and phonograph record field. 



ARGENTINA 



GERMANY 



MICROFON 
RECORDS 

The most aggressive record com- 
pany in Argentina 

Representing 

• Audio Fidelity (U. S. A.) 

• Durium (Italy) 

• Supraphon (Czechoslovakia) 

AND NOW! 

Cadence — Coral — Brunswick — 
Everest — Chancellor — Canadian- 
American — Prestige. 

MICROFON ARGENTINA SRL 

Lavalle 1759, 5 Piso 
Buenos Aires, Argentina 



For information on 

MUSIC BOX and 
RECORD BUSINESS 
IN EUROPE 



AUTOMATEN-MARKT 

14, Ekberistrasse 
Braunschweig. Germany 
Phone: 22900/23115 

Telex 09 52 604 



GREECE 



WE SEEK ONE ADDITIONAL 

RECORD LINE FOR 
GREECE, EGYPT & LEBANON 

With over 30 years' experience in 
handling records in this part of the 
world, we know you get a fair 
treatment only from the firm that 
concentrates on your label, not ten 
or twenty or thirty others. 
If you want experience and honest 
consideration, why not write now to 

MIDDLE EAST RECORDINGS 

Evans Plomaritis, President 
4 Sportis, Athens, Greece 



ENGLAND 



IN ENGLAND 
Advertise in the 

NEW MUSICAL 
EXPRESS 

to reach your best 
record buyers 

For information write 

NEW MUSICAL EXPRESS 

23 Denmark Street 
London, W.C. 2, England 



PAUL SIEGEL (BERLIN-NEW YORK*, 
producer of Tetefunken-Decca (Teldect 
Records. Disc Jockey: Radio Berlin 
(SFB). Music Publisher; Hi-Fi Muxikver 
las GMBH. Cable; Symphn.vrex. Berlin. 
Telephone: Berlin 24i029, Address 
Tauentzlen str. 16, Berlin W30. Germany 

when answering ods . . . 
Say You Saw It 
In Billboard 



GENERAL 



THE RAY CONNIFF CLUB. A CLUB FOR 
people who like Ray's kind of music. For 
details send Reply Coupon to Lois 
Rotund*. 99 Hurst Rd.. Ertth, Kent. 
England. 



PHONOGRAPH RECORD MADE OUT OF 
your 3-inch tapes in 331? plastic, mail- 
able. 20 minutes. Prepaid. $3. Talis, 3 
Sprinc St., Worcester. Majur., U. S. A. 



FRANCE 



RECORDING ARTISTS. FILM STARS 
and leading personalities always visit 
Harry's New York Bar in Paris. Become 
a member of International Bar Flics, 
Trap No. 1 is at Harry's, 5 Rue Daunou, 
Just off the Rue de la Paix. Tell the 
cab driver Sank Roo Doc Noo. 



SAY YOU 
SAW IT IN 
BILLBOARD 
INTERNATIONAL 
EXCHANGE 



FOR INFORMATION 

You can reach the U. S. and World-Wide Music-Record markets 
regularly, effectively and al very low cost in these columns. 

For information contact: 



THE AMERICAS 



MEXICO: Dr. Otto Mayer-Serra, 
Apartado 8688, Mexico City 
PUERTO RICO: Anthony Confreres, 

26 Gerlrudit St., Santurce 
VENEZUELA: Cfemente Vargas, Jr. 
Radio Caracas 
Av. Paez, El Paraiso, Caracas 
BRAZIL: Mauricio Quadrio 
Billboard 
Rua Visconda da Gavee, 125 

Rio de Janeiro 
ARGENTINA: Ruben Machado 
Billboard 
Lavalle 1783, Buenos Aires 
CHILE: Ricardo Garcia 
Radio Mineria, Moneda 973, Santiago 



ASIA & PACIFIC 



AUSTRALIA: Brian Nebemahl 
P. 0. Bok 418, North Sydney 

HONG KONG: Carl Myatt 
27 Estoril Court, Garden Road 

JAPAN: Robtrt Wynn 
52 1 -2 Chome, Sihimo Mcguro 
Meguro-ku, Tokyo 

NEW ZEALAND: Fred Gebble 
P. 0. Box 5051. Auckland 

PHILIPPINES: Luis Ma Trinidad 
264 Escolla, Manila 



EUROPE 



Arthur Rosett, European Director 
44 Curzon St., London W. 1 
GROsvenar 7496 



ITALY: Samuel Steinman 
Piazza 5. Anjelmo 1, Rome 



Frank Luspino Jr., International Advertising Director, 
Billboard, 1S64 Broadway, New York City 36 

ADVERTISING RATES INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE 

CLASSIFIED: Per line $1. Minimum 4 lines per insertion. 
DISPLAY: Per inch $14. Minimum one inch. 

Above prices are for one insertion in one issue. Cash With Order, Please. 
Lower rales for 12, 26 er 52 insertions in a ona-year period 



c 



38 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 




"HEART 
BREAK 
SOCIETY" 

by 

THE RADIANTS 

Chess #1849 

"GOT YOU 

ON 
MY MIND" 

by 

COOKIE & HIS 
CUPCAKES 

Chess #1848 

"Since I Fell 
for You" 

by 

THE VIBRATIONS 

Checker #1038 

"STORMY" 

by 

THE CORSAIRS 

Chess #1847 

"HOT 
CAKES" 

by 

DAVE "BABY" 
CORTEZ 

Chess #1850 



HOflOR ROLL OF HITS 



FOR WEEK ENDING MARCH 23 



The Honor Roll of Hits comprises the notion's top tunes according 
to record sales and disk jockey performances as determined by 
Billboard's weekly nationwide surveys. 



This Last 

Week WmIi Tunc 



Composer-Publisher 



Weeks 

on 
Char! 



© 



2 OUR DAY WILL COME 3 

By Milliard Ganson— Published by Rosewood (ASCAP, 



® 4 



END Of THE WORLD 5 

By Dec-Kent— Published by Summit (ASCAP) 



© 
© 



9 HE'S $0 HNE 3 

By Mack— Published by Bright Tunes (BMl) 



3 YOU'RE THE REASON I'M LIVING 8 

By Darin— Published by Adaris (BMl) 



5 RHYTHM OF THE RAIN 8 

By C.ummoe— Published by Sherman-DeVorzon (BMIl 



© 

© 1 "P. 1 



LIKE A MAN 8 

rewe-Gaudio — Published by Salurday-Gavadcma ( ASCAP) 



© 


16 


SOUTH STREET 




By Mann-Appell— Published by Kalmann (ASCAP) 






8 


BLAME IT ON THE BOSSA NOVA 




© 


By Mann-Weil— Published by Aldon (BMl) 




® • 


RUBY BABY 




By Lieber-Stoller— Published by Tiger (BMl) 




® 


in 


WHAT Will MY MARY SAY 




By Vance- Snyder — Published by Elm Drive (ASCAP) 






14 


OUR WINTER LOVE 




By Cowcll— Published by Cramart (BMl) 






13 


IN DREAMS 




By Orbison— Published by Aeuff-Rose (BMl) 




® 


12 


ONE BROKEN HEART FOR SALE 




By Black wcll-Scoit— Published by Presley (BMl) 




® 


7 


HFY PAULA 


10 


By Hildebrand— Published by LeBill-Marbill (BMl) 


© 


11 


uiiin wrfKFUn 




By Shannon-Todaro— Published by Shan-Todd A Tupper (BMl) 






28 






CM) 


By Vimmerstedt-Mercer— Published by Commander (ASCAP) 




® 


27 


in i uiux ta i\a it rvnciu 




By Bryant— Published by Acuff-Rose (BMl) 




® 


15 


MAMA DIDN'T LIE 




By Mayficld— Published by Curtom (BMl) 




® 


18 


ALICE IN WONDERLAND 




By Sedaka-Grecnficld— Published by Aldon (BMl ) 






20 


LET'S LIMBO SOME MORE 




By Mann-Appell — Published by Kalmann (ASCAP) 




® 


23 


LET'S TURKEY TROT 




By Goffin-Kinj£— Published by Aldon (BMl) 






19 


WALK RIGHT IN 


10 


® 


By Darling-Svamic — Published by Ryersnn (BMl) 


® 




LAUGHING BOY 






By Robinson— Published by Jobete (BMl) 




® 


21 


GREENBACK DOLLAR 




By Axton-Ramscy — Published by Davon (BMl) 




© 




DON'T SET ME FREE 






By J ames-J ones— Published by Tee-Pee (ASCAP) 




© 




BABY WORKOUT 






By Wilson-Tucker— Published by Merrimac (BMl) 




© 


24 


BUTTERFLY BABY 




By Mann-Appell— Published by Kalmann IASCAPI 




® 




DO THE BIRD 






By Mann-Appcll— Published by Kalmann (ASCAP) 




© 




TWENTY MILES 






By Mann-Lowe— Published by Wyncote-Kalmann (ASCAP) 




© 


29 


BOSS GUITAR 




By Ha'lcwood-EdUy— Published by Linduancc (BMl) 





RECORDINGS AVAILABLE 
(leil Sailing Record Lined In told Face) 



1. OUR DAY WILL COME — 
Eddie CMO, Reprise 2D147: Rud- 
and Hit- Romantics, Kapp 501. 

2. END OF THE WORLD — 
Skecler Dayb. RCA Vletor ROOK: 

Mills Brothers. Dot 16451 

.1. HE'S SO FINE — I h iff on, 
Laurie 3152. 

4. YOU'RE THE REASON I'M 
LIVING— Bohhs Darin. Capilol 
4»97. 

5. RHYTHM OF THE RAIN — I 
Cascades. Valiant 6026. 

6. WALK LIKE A MAN — Four 
Seasons, V« Jay 485. 

7. SOUTH STREET — Orlons. 
Caraeo 24]. 

«. BLAME IT ON THE BOSSA 
NOVA — Eydie ConBe. Columbia 
42661. 

9. RUBY BABY — Cody Brennun. ft 
Swan 4089: Dion, Columbia 
42662: Drillers. Atlantic 1089. 

10. WHAT WILL MY MARY SAY 
— Johnny Marhls, Columbia 
42666. 

11. OUR WINTER LOVE — Anita 
Bryant. Columbia 42739: Bill 
Pursed. Columbia 42619. 

12. IN DREAMS — Roy Orbbon. 
Monument 806. 

13. ONE BROKEN HEART FOR 
SALE — Elyis Presley. RCA Vic- 
tor 81.34. 

14. HEY PAULA— Paul A Paula. 
Philips 35017. 

15. WILD WEEKEND — Rebels, 
Swan 4125. 

16. I WANNA BE AROUND — 
Tony Bennett. Columbia 42634. 

17. ALL I HAVE TO DO IS 
DREAM— Richard Chamberlain. 
MGM 13121. 

IS. MAMA DIDN'T LIE — Jan 
Bradley, Chess 1845; Fascina- 
tions. ABC-Paramount 10.187. 

19. ALICE IN WONDERLAND— 
Nell Scdaka. RCA Victor 8137. 

20. LET'S LIMBO SOME MORE — 
Chubby Checker. Parkssay 862. 

21. LET'S TURKEY TROT — Little 
Eva, Dimension 1006. 

22. WALK RIGHT IN— Moments. 
Era 3099: Rooftop Stagers. Van- 
guard 35017. 



23. LAUGHING BOY'— Mary Wells. 
Motovra 1039. 



24. GREENBACK DOLLAR — Hoy I 

Axton. Horiron 362: Kingston 
Trio. Capilol 4898; Merry Mel- 
ody Singers. Mercury 72083: Vir- 
ginians. Colpix 5666, 

25. DONT SET ME FREE— Ray 
Charles. ABC-Paramount 10405. 

26. BABY WORKOUT — Jackie Wil- 
son. Brunssyick 55239. 

27. BUTTERFLY BABY — Bobby 
Rjdell, Cameo 242. 

28. DO THE BIRD — Dec Dee Sharp. 
Cameo 244. 

29. TWENTY MILES — Chubby 
Checker. Parkway 862. 

30. BOSS GUITAR — Duane Eddy. 
RCA Victor 8131. 



Will lly to tkm top I 

I'M GEniN' SENTIMENTAL 

OVER YOU (Bona Nova) 
burt mm 

end His New Plane Seond 

IFEUTIOI 
f.'ffier Side a Hlfl 

BROKEN DATE 

b/w 

Broken Date— Bossa Nova 
FRANK HUBBELL S NUBB-CAPS 

(TOPIXI 

WHO'S SORRY NOW! 

■ LLOYD PUCE 

ABC-PARAMOUNT' 

MILLS MUSIC, INC. 



"I'M A 
SOLDIER BOY" 

DEE CLARK 

VJ 487 

RECORDS 

1449 S. Michigan Ave. 
Chicago 5, III. 



SAM and DAVE 

"IT WAS SO 
NICE WHILE 
IT LASTED" 

R 4)4(0 

ROULETTE RECORDS 

1631 B'woy, N. Y., N. Y. 



WUI8ICE CHfUUER (UrUY HILLS 



Tta ITgST I 




First Time on Newtown! 

BILL HALEY 

and the Comets 

UP GOES LOVE 
TENOR MAN 

Newtown #5013 
NEWTOWN RECORDS 

663S N. Broad St., Philadelphia. Pa. 




BREAKING IN 
ALL MARKETS '. 

BARBARA LYNN 

"DON'T BE 
CRUEL" 



b/w "Ym Can't Be Satisfied" 

Jamie s 1244 



Jamie Guy den 

Di st Corp. 
Philadelphia 23, Pa. 



WARNING— The title 'HONOR ROLL OK HITS' is a reiijs.ercd trade-mark ami Ihe listltiR of 
Ihc hits has been copyrighted by Billboard. Use of cither may not be made without 
Billboard's consent. Requests for such consent should be submitted in writinn to the publishers 
of Billboard at 1564 Broadway. New York 36, N. Y. 



R & B One-Stop 
HEADQUARTERS 

Just ask for it, We've got it. 
Write to be put on our mailing list. 
Free Title Strips for Ops. 

MUSIC BOX ONE-STOP 

1 301 w 79th St.. Chicago 20. Ill 

Phone: AB 4-3600 
3334 W. Pica Blvd., Las Anqeles 6, Calif. 
Phane: DU S-MIJ 



CHESS 

PRODUCING CORP. 

2120 S. Michigan Chicago 16, III. 



the place to be... April '63 




I'll DIM MM: 

A vastly expanded and com- 
prehensive study of Radio 
Station Program Practices . . . 
with data acquired through 
scientifically conducted direct- 
mail surveys: 

• Average deejay hours on 
the air 

• The "who" behind record 
selection 

• Records' share of broadcast 
time 

• Share— by type of music 

• Frequency of play 

• Basis of selection 

• Sponsorship patterns 

AND . . . pre-conve ntion 
announcements and agenda 
notes pertaining to the 

NAB 

(NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 
OF BROADCASTERS) 

Chicago Convention, March 
31 through April 4 . . . with 
free distribution of this spe- 
cial "Programming & Talent" 
issue to all Convention 
attendees. 



TALENT: 



designed for broadcasters 
and every other exciting segment of the music industry 

The season's most important, most influential 
industry-service publication 

A special section in the April 6 issue . . . full Billboard size 
... of concise, authoritative information, fully researched pro- 
gramming charts and surveys, capsule biographies of the world's 
leading recording artists, and the personal messages of the stations, 
the companies and the artists making news — making history. 

A powerful, colorful medium affording you maximum distribution 
and impact to sell and influence . . . 

Radio Station Management • Disk Jockeys • Record Dealers • 
Columnists • Talent Buyers • Distributors • Juke Box Operators 
• TV Producers • Agencies/Sponsors • Movie Producers. 

THE TIME WAS NEVER BETTER — THE VALUES 
NEVER GREATER ... for your selling message to reach 
the industry's largest, most concentrated buying market. 

ad deadline: M&reh 25th 

CONTACT YOUR BILLBOARD SALESMAN NOW. 

New York Hollywood Chicago Nashville London 



• Famous Artist Biography 
Section 

• Detailed management, 
label and record data on 
each artist 

• Top artist background ma- 
terial for deejay "chatter" 

• Talent buying facts and 
figures 



FOinilT: 



Billboard's new slick paper, 
offset format now allows this 
special "Quarterly" to be pro- 
duced in full Billboard page 
size ... at absolutely no cost 
increase over previous page 
rates for this special issue 
which were less than half the 
size! 

PIUS ... a FREE second color 
on all units of one page or 
more. 



40 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23. 1963 



Many Physicians 
Stop Smoking . . . 

PARIS: (Mar. 22) Cenire de 
Propagandc Anti-Tabuc reports: 
KK.64K heavy smokers (of whom 
many are physicians) have stopped 
smoking, thanks to a new formula 
( Pronicotyl ) which reduces the 
urge to smoke. Those who wish 
information about this new method 
of breaking the tobacco habit may 
receive a free Brochure (as long 
as the supply lasts) by sending 
their name and address to 
Anti-Tobacco Center of America, 
366 Fifth Ave, Dept. I79DI, 

New York I, N. Y. - Advertisement 



• ALBUM REVIEWS 



"PEACE IN THE 
VALLEY" 

THE HARRY SIMEONE CHORALE 



From Hli Album 

' SING WE 
NOW THE 
SONGS OF 
FAITH" 




CLUB LONG ISLAND RECORDS I 

661 Haighl St. UH 3 9768 j 

S.F., Calif. M 21306 [ 

-SMASH HIT- ' 

Already Passed 30,000 | 

"GROOVING LIGHTLY" I 

*• Emit Kennedy. Jr. j 
MOVING VERY FAST 



2. 



"HOLD MY HAND" 

Emit Kennedy. Sr. 
ALSO VERY HOT 

"LATE HI EIGHT TWIST" 

Floyd Dixon 



.1 



Continued from page 32 

ALBUM 
REVIEW 
POLICY 

Every album unl to Billboard 
for review it heard by Bill 
board' » Review Panel, and 
itt tales potential it rated 
within itt category of muttc. 
Rating* of only the outttand- 
ing LP's of the week are 
published, including all re- 
ceiving a 4-Star review or 
better, thut focuting atten- 
tion on albumt with the 
greotett talei potential. Full 
reviews are presented for 
Spotlight Picks or Special 
Merit Picks, and all 4-Star 
LP's are listed under their 
respective categories 



[™J JAZZ SPECIAL MERIT 

FATHEAD COMES ON 
Dove Newman. Atlantic 1399 (M) 
Here's a nice, uncomplicated brand of 
swinging jazz put out by Ray Charles' solid 
man on the reeds. "Fathead," fronting two 
different groups-one is rhythm with trum- 
pet and the other jutt rhythm, shows his 
versatility by blowing tenor, alto and flute 
on the variout tracks. One particularly in- 
teresting outing is the Charles vocal hit 
of a while back, "Unchain My Heart," 
which has an extended flute solo. Others 
include "Hello There," "Lady Day" and 
"ScufflinV 



£2%J JAZZ SPECIAL MERIT 

THAT'S HOW I LOVE THE BLUES! 
Mark Murphy. Riverside RM 441 (M) 
Singer Mark Murphy has been on the scene 
for a good spell but he has seldom had a 
better showcasing than this, which, inci- 
dentally, is almost as strong in the pop 
vein as in jaiz. Working against spate but 
fine arrangements by Al Cohn which high- 
lights organ and trumpets, he offers, with 
taste, items like "Goin' to Chicago Blues," 
"Jelly Jelly Blues" and "Rusty Dusty 
Blues." Good wax that can easily make a 
dent. 



An Overnight Smash! 

most 

GC1DEN 
C LI IFS 

MARC Y JO and 
EDDIE RAMDEAU 

S-4136 

Six Great Oldies in One New Hit 

Please Note Our New Home! 



SWAN RECORDS 

N.W. Corner 8th & Fitz water St. 
Philadelphia 47, Pa. MA 7-1500 



(Sjjy JAZZ SPECIAL MERIT 

SONNY CRISS 

Imperial LP 9205 (M) 
Those who have long looked for the final 
evolvemenl of the art of alto saxist Sonny 
Criss will be most interested in this album. 
The saxist, who first emerged still in his 
teens, during the reign of Charlie Parker, 
plays wild, extraordinary inventive solos 
here. He is accompanied simply by rhythm 
section, Standards form the basis of his 
material. 



{™J CLASSICAL SPECIAL MERIT 

PROKOFIEV: TWO SONATAS FOR 
VIOLIN AND PIANO 

Joseph Siigeti, Violin; Artur Balsam, 
Piano 

Mercury MG 50319 (M); SR 90319 (S) 
Joseph Szigeti has long been associated 
with Prokotiev'l music, to this etching of 
the compoter't two violin sonatas can be 
regarded as authentic in style and spirit. 
The veteran fiddler brings hit unique mu- 
skality to the task and the result is a 
highly interesting disk. The only competi- 
tive version with both sonatas features 
David Oistrakh on the Bruno label. 



VSyf CLASSICAL SPECIAL MERIT 

BEETHOVEN: TRIO NO. 6 IN B FLAT 
MAJOR, OPUS 97 

Horszowski-VeghcasQis Trio. Philips 
PHM 500 016 (M); PHS 900-016 (St 
Recorded live at a performance in the 
Beethovenhaus in Bonn, Germany, this LP 
is distinguished by the outstanding cello 
playing of Pablo Casals, who is admirably 
partnered by Horszowtki on piano and 
Vegh on violin. This is easily Beethoven's 
most popular trio, and this becomes one 
of the most desirable of the several avail- 
able versions. 



\££j COMEDY SPECIAL MERIT 

THE ABSURD IMPOSTERS 
Jim Coyle & Mel Sharpe 
Warner Bros. W 1494 (M); WS 1494 
There are truly some wild goings-on on 
this newest (or perhaps the oldest) ap- 
proach to comedy. Coyle and Sharpe are 
masters at putting the unsuspecting on, as 
for example in the case of enlisting a serv- 
ice station operator's help in storming a 
factory with tanks and machine guns be- 
cause "he's our enemy." In another case 
they argue with a San Francisco barber on 
the fact that "you don't mean to say we're 
■n San Francisco do you? I mean we're 
really in New York." Somehow in each 
nutty interview the hidden tape machine 
is hidden enough so that the victim is 
completely taken in, and there are funny 
moments indeed in the dozen tracks. 



\*gj COMEDY SPECIAL MERIT 

ARCHIE CAMPBELL PRESENTS 
THE JOKER IS WILD 

Starday SLP 223 

"Grand Ole Opry" comic, Campbell, has re- 
ceived a good response on an earlier album 
for Starday, "Bedtime Stories for Adults," 
and this sequel, following along with a 
similar kind of bluish humor, can achieve 
the same kind of reaction. The gags are 
pretty rough in spots, and not the kind to 
be heard on his on-the-air appearances, but 
the fans should dig it all. Cover, showing 
Campbell in a strip poker game with fern 
companions will catch lots of looks. 



[™j FOLK SPECIAL MERIT 

SING OUTI HOOTENANNY 

Variout Artittt. Folkwayt FN 2513 
Many collectors will regard this as a gem. 
The set consisti of early performances, going 
back as many as 20 years, of such stalwart 
Folk names as Woody Guthrie. Leon Bibb, 
Pete Seeger, Fred HeMerman, Betly Sanders 
and various accompanying groups. Of these, 
Pete Seeger appears most often. Informa- 
tive sheets of notes are by Irwin Silber 
and full texts of all the material are In- 
cluded, 



ffijjX INTERNATIONAL SPECIAL 
MERIT 

TAH IT! AN PARADISE 

Eddie Lund & Hit Tahitiant 
ABC-Paramount ABC 444 (M) ; ABCS 
444 (S) 

Each year many, many polynesian-flavored 
albums appear, but here's one that stands 
out a bit over the rest for its authentic 
fdavor, good vocal performances in the 
traditional manner, and fine ukulele, guitar 
and percussion backing. The tunes include 
a lahitian-styled rock and roller, a cha cha, 
and many with strong folk flavor of the 
Islands. Set has good sound and a legiti- 
mate ring. 



SPECIALTY SPECIAL MERIT 



INSIDE SINA 

Charm CM 110 

This wacky LP purports lo be a recording 
made at a meeting of the Society for In- 
decency to Naked Animals, which says it 
wants lo clothe any domestic animal stand- 
ing higher than four inches or longer than 
six inches. Lots of laughs here, as one 
side is devoted to an exposition of the 
group's alleged aims, and the other side to 
a question and answer session. SINA has 
just made national headlines by picketing 
the White House as a means of clothing 
Caroline's pony Macaroni. Can all this ac- 
tivity have anything to do with (he telease 
Of this disk? 



(•y POLKA SPECIAL MERIT 

POLKA STARS ON PARADE 

Various Artists. Joy Joy 1059 
Li'l Wally and his band play only -n the 
first track of this LP, with each track 
featuring a different polka group. Li'l 
Wally introduces each track, which pro- 
vides the feeling of a continuing show. 
The tunes seem mainly lo be originals, and 
they provide good dancing music and good 
fun for polka parties. 



4-STAR REVIEWS 

The 4-Sfer rating is awarded new albums 
with sufficient commercial potential In their 
respective categories to merit being stocked 
by most dealers, one-stops and rack jobbers 
handling that category. 



POLKA 



*** » wniy's Polk* (Traditional) 
2:i2>— »* + * Moja Del. I* (Tiadl- 
lionaJI (3d)]). GATEWAY Tt] 



POPULAR 



**** HERE THEY ARE! THE 
COLDCOAST SINGERS 
World Pacific I "Of, 

* * « * THE CONTEMPORARY 
FOLK GROUP 

Horizon WP 1615 

**** SOUL SURF1N' 

Rhythm Rockers. Challenge CH «17 

**** THE FOUR SAINTS 
Warner Bros. W 1477 <M> 

* * * * SOUND COLORS.U P 

Cltff Duphlney. Decora-Amphora DA 
LP 2011 (SI 

**** EASY DOES IT 
The Jackie Davis Ouartel. Wamer 
Bros. W 1492 [Mil WS 1492 ISl 

**** CHARLIE BYRD BAMBA- 
SAMBA BOSSA NOVA 

Everest 5216 (Mil 1216 IS) 

* »** THE LEE EVANS TRIO 
Capitol T 1S47 (Mil ST 1847 LSI 

**** STEEI. AND STRINGS 

Jimmy Day. Philips PHM 200475 IM); 
PHS 600475 (S) 

**** MUSICAL MOODS OF 
THE MONA LISA 

Variout Artists. ABC-Paramount ABC 

448 (Ml; ABCS 44(1 ISl 

**** THE SURFERS HIT MOVIE 
SONGS FROM THE EXOTIC IS- 
LANDS 

Warner Bros. W 1493 I Ml; W S 1493 

ISl 

JIMMY RUSSELL 

• « * * Blue B e | u I n e IBrown. 
ASCAPI 12:43). DORIAN 107 

THE EMPIRES 

★ Three Little Fishles (Joy, 
ASCAPI 12:331. COI.PIX MB 



JAZZ 



+ *** ONE WAY 
John Gray. Capitol T 1852 IM); ST 
1852 ISl 

**** JAZZ 

The Johnny Griffin Trio. Workshop 
Jazz 205 

**★* JAZZA NOVA 
Paula Alenrar and HLs Brazilian All- 
Stars. Alco 33-153 IM) 

(ear** WILD BILL DAVIS 
Imperial LP 9201 (Ml 

**** OUT! 

Jack Sheldon and his Ouartet. Capi- 
tol T 1851 IM); ST 1851 ISl 



CLASSICAL 



» » •« OPERATIC ARIAS BY 
FRANCO COREI.LI 
Amiel 35918 IS) 



FOLK 



»*** FOLKSONGS OF 
THE CATSKILLS 

Barbara Monrure, Harry Slemsen. 

Folkways FH 5311 

*• *♦ UNCLE DAVE MACON 
RBF RF 51 



COUNTRY 



★ **★ PICK1N* GR1NN1V 
Bluett-ass Hfllblllles. ABC-Paramount 
ABC 446 (Ml; ABCS 4441 Si 



SACRED 



**** THE COUNTRY GOSPEL 
SINGERS 

Happy Hearts, i"H Mr 



SPOKEN WORD 



***+ THE POEMS OE 
NORMAN ROSTEN 
Folkways FL 9704 

COLETTE'S MUSIC HALL 
SIDELIGHTS 

Claire Luce and Julie Haydnn F'nlk- 

»nyi FL 9811 



POLKA 



*«■** DANCING FINGERS 
1.11 Wally. Jay Jay 1055 

**** POLKA SLOVENIAN STYLE 
Tony Omerzo and his Ork. Jay Jay 
1051 



RELIGIOUS 



**** LET FREEDOM SING 

Stadfo Band and Chorus (Eddie Bal- 
lanllnc. Dir.). Miranda 262 (SI 

**** CATHOLIC HYMNS 
St. Charles Choir I Pan Salamuno- 
skh. Cond.l. Imperial LP 9228 (M) 



CHILDREN'S 



*»•• LET'S GO TO THE ZOO 
Diplomat 5023 

*«*» LET'S GO TO A MOTHER 
GOOSE JAMBOREE 

Hear* To* las and David Ormont. 

Diplomat 502D 

*«»* LETS CO TO THE CIRCUS 
Diplomat 5022 



LIKE A BIRD 

Op Song Leads 
Sid Merry Chase 

NEW YORK — The travels 
and Iravails of a record on its 
way lo exposure can sometimes 
become deeply complicated, as 
in the case of a current upcom- 
ing Epic release of "The Op 
Song." hy Jimmy Kellv and the 
Op Birds. 

Originally cut in 1959. the 
disk was on Sid Mills' Diana 
label. Mills subsequently leased 
the disk out to Astra Records. 

"The record just seemed to 
disappear and 1 forgot about it," 
Mills said last week. "Then it 
turned up recently on the Ceve- 
tone label. Even though I hadn't 
put it out this time, I began 
getting calls from distributors, 
since they saw the tunc was in 
my Diana Music firm. 

"I ran the record down, found 
the label and when Dave 
Kapralik, Lcn Levy and Bob 
Morgan heard it, they wanted 
it. Now it's coming out on Epic, 
its fourth label. I hope it's a 
hit this time." 



LITTLE BAND 
OF 

GOLD 

James Gilreath 
JOY 274 




SMASHItn 



WHAT A GUY! 

THE RAINDROPS 



Jubilee 5444 



Nationally distributed by 
JAY-GEE RECORD CO.. INC. 
31 B W. 48th St.. N Y. 36, N.Y. 



c 




too 




« FROM ABC-PARAMOUNT 
®: THE "HOUSE OF HITS" 



S i 2 Will Rl( 



RAY CHARLES 




/^p\ 7 8 18 BUHl 

DON'T SET ME FREE 
THE BRIGHTEST SMILE 
IN TOWN 

ABC-10405 
TOMMY ROE 

THE FOLKSINGER 
COUNT ON ME 

ABC-10423 
THE PERCELLS 

WHAT ARE BOYS MADE OF? 
CHEEK TO CHEEK 

ABC-10401 
LLOYD PRICE 

WHO'S SORRY NOW? 
HELLO, BILL 

ABC-10412 
STEVE ROSSI 

ONE MAN SHOW 
MR. JONES, I LOVE 



® 



YOUR DAUGHTER 

ABC-10414 



THE APPALACHIANS 

Hf wan m S IH0M4KD I BONY MORONIE 

IT TAKES A MAN 

ABC-10419 
THE IMPRESSIONS 

I'M THE ONE WHO LOVES YOU 
I NEED YOUR LOVE 

ABC-10386 
BETTY O'BRIEN 

TRUE, TRUE LOVE 
IS THAT THE WAY 
YOU PLANNED IT? 

ABC-10410 
THE COTILLIONS 

SOMETIMES I GET LONELY 
ONE OF THESE DAYS 

ABC-10413 
DON DAY CURTIS 

DON'T SIT UNDER 
THE APPLE TREE 
THE STORY OF JANIE 



HOT 1 li 



ANN MARIE 

ALWAYS A BRIDESMAID " « DAVEY 



ABC-10416 



100 



ABC-10418 



Distributed in Canada by Sparton of Canada, Ltd. 



BIGGER "HITS" AND BIGGER PROFITS -FOR EVERY DEALER, OPERATOR, ONE-STOP AND RACK-JOBBER! 



ABC-PARAMOUNT 




Copyi 



42 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23. 1963 



Many Stations Get Bad Taste in 
Mouth Over JFK Take-Off Diet 



Radio-TV 



PROGRAMMING 

• READY-TO-OO PROGRAMMING • VOX JOX 
• PROGRAMMING NEWSLETTER 



Industry Staffs Panels 
For College Radio Meet 

NEW YORK — Undergraduate operators of campus commercial 
stations will be flocking to New York to participate in the Second 
Collegiate Broadcasters Conference scheduled Thursday and Friday, 
March 21 and 22, under sponsorship of the International Radio 
and Television Foundation. 



NEW YORK — Record buyers may be ready to "Sing Along With JFK," but they may have to find 
the tune without any help from their local radio station. A check of some of the key markets around the 
nation has revealed that several stations have adopted a no-play policy on the latest Reprise album offering 
"Sing Along With JFK," as well as other new take-offs. One side of the Reprise album features recorded 
excerpts from several of the President's most important speeches interspersed with a sing-along chorus. 

Eddie Clark, program director 

of WHK, Cleveland (Metrome- 
dia-owned), told Billboard that 
as a result of this latest over- 
drive by the record makers, "no 
albums or singles that feature 
any take-offs on the President 
of the United States or his fam- 
ily will be played now or any 
other time on WHK." 

Clark emphasized that he 
feels the record companies turn- 
ing out this type of comedy "are 
deprecating the nation's leader 
at a critical time in our history — 
whether the intent he just to 
have some fun or not." 

WIND'S program chief Guy 
Harris made this comment about 
the Reprise effort and Kennedy 
take-offs in general. "The Sing 
Along with JFK" album is defi- 
nitely in poor taste," said Harris. 

He added: "We even stopped 
playing 'The First Family' al- 
bum here at WIND (WBC, Chi- 
cago) a week after we received 
it in order to avoid running the 
gimmick into the ground. The 
same holds true with all of this 
follow-up-imitation material, the 
record people are running the 
gimmick into the ground." 

Mo Ostin, general manager of 
Reprise, feels the most impor- 
tant factor governing the matter 
is intent and the spirit in which 
the material is presented. "The 
album was never meant to be 
disrespectful and was presented 
to the public in the spirit of 
good fun." said Ostin. 

Ostin went on to say that he 
thought the "Sing Along With 
JFK" album left a lasting im- 
pression of the importance of 
the words of the President. 

"It's cleverly conceived and 
we feel that in a free country 
such as ours satire has always 
had a wide acceptance," Ostin 
said. 

"The holier-than-thou attitude 
of the critics of the album take- 
off on the President is not un- 
derstandable after the over- 
whelming acceptance of 'The 
First Family' with Vaughn 
Meader and similar comedy sat- 
(Ctmtinued on pti^e 45) 



In a program put together by 
a IRTS committee headed by 
John V. B. Sullivan, WNEW, 
vice-president, the collegiates 
will have the opportunity of 
learning the ins and outs of 
station operations during several 
panel discussions and get- 
acquainted luncheons. 

A group of top industry 
spokesmen will discuss station 
operations and answer ques- 
tions submitted by delegates 
during the first panel discussion 
slated for 10 a.m. Thursday. 
Panel Members 

The panel will include: Mark 
Olds, general manager, WINS, 
N. Y., moderator; Bill Schwartz, 
program director, WNBC, N. Y. 
and H S. (Hank) Basayne. pro- 
gram manager. KCBS, San 
Francisco, programming: Ste- 
phen F. Temmer, president, 
Gotham Audio Development 
Corporation, engineering; Ray 
Green, general manager, 
WFLN. Philadelphia, FM broad- 
casting: John J. (Chick) Kelly, 
director advertising and promo- 
tion, Storer Broadcasting, Miami 
Beach, promotion, and Lee Han- 
na, news director. WNEW, 
N. Y., news. 

Thursday's luncheon speaker 
will be Melvin Goldberg, vice- 
president, research, national As- 
sociation of Broadcasters. Dele- 
gates will then be broken up in 
groups and given an opportunity 
to visit CBS radio and television. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH. 

NYU HOST FOR 
RADIO PARLEY 

NEW YORK — New York 
University's WNYU and WCAG 
are host stations for the 
annual Intercollegiate Broad- 
casting System Convention to 
take place Saturday at the Uni- 
versity Heights Campus. 

More than 200 college radio 
stations across the country will 
be represented at the day-long 
conclave. 

ii!iiiiii!:irarraii:!iiii!!i.iiiii:iiiii;ii!ii!iiiii!iiiii!iiiiii!iiiiiiii!iiiii 

WNEW and a tape recording 
studio. 

Friday the college radio op- 
erators will attend a panel dis- 
cussion on career opportunities 
in radio and television. 

Answers 

On hand (o answer the vital 
questions on "How to break 
into . . ." will be Lawrence 
Delia Corte. personnel director. 
Doyle. Dane and Bcrnbach, ad- 
vertising agency; Shirlee Barish, 
Broadcast Personnel Associates, 
and J. Noel Deutscher. man- 
ager, organization development. 
NBC. The 10 a.m. to noon dis- 
cussion will be moderated by 
Dominic Quinn. program direc- 
tor. WINS. N. Y. 

In a conference wind-up ses- 



sion Friday afternoon, collegiate 
broadcasters will swap ideas on 
station operations. The students 
will be assisted by a panel of 
experts and Stephen B. l.abun- 
ski, vice-president and general 
manager, WMCA, N. Y. will 
moderate. 



Focus on the Deejay Scene . . 




CONGSTRESS GIGI GALON re- 
vealed her greatest ambition 
to Mike Stephens, host of "The 
Mike Stephens S h o w," seen 
Wednesdays on WCAX-TV, Bur- 
lington, Vt. Miss Galon one day 
hopes to see her name on 
Billboard's Hot 100. Gigi, who 
recently appeared at the Ritz 
Carlton Hotel supper club in 
Montreal, is slated for an ap- 
pearance on the 'Tonight" show 
later this week. Mike has in- 
troduced a number of upcoming 
artists on his shows during his 
deejay days in Montreal and 
current TV show. Among these 
were Connie Francis, the Four 
Aces, Paul Anka, the Crew-Cuts 
and Johnny Mathis. 



READY -TO -GO 

PROGRAMMING 



Pfogrim dlrKtart »nd 4\tk facksyi will Und this matt'lal » ready sauna 
from which to build weekly programming periods All that's natM art 
the disks from the station's record library. 



BEST TRACKS 

FROM THE NEW 
SPOTLIGHT IP'S 

Thase are the tracks selected tor disk [«ckey 
programming by Billboard's reviewing pantl 
•I the most outstanding from This seeek'a 
ncwr LP Snollithls. 



I.U.TS LIMBO SOMK MOHK— Chubby 
Checker (Parkway P 7027. SP 70271 
"Mariana" 

I WANNA BE AROUND — Tony Ben- 
nett (Columbia CI 21100. CS KH00) 
"The Good Life" 

THE END Of THE WORLD — Skccler 
Davis (RCA Victor LPM 2MW. I SP 
26W1 "Why I'm Walkinc" (BMI| 
(2:45) 

BLAME IT ON BOSSA NOVA— Mydie 
Ciorme (Columbia CL 2012. CS KKI2I 
"The Sweetest Sounds" (Williamson. 
ASCAP) 

OUR WINTER LOVE— Bill Purccll 
(Columbia CL ml. CS *7»2) "Pour 
Wall!" 

MY MUSICAL COLORING BOOK — 

Enoch Li|lh( A His Ork (Command 
RSMflSD) "Yellow Bird" 

THE BARBARA STREISAND AL- 
BUM — (Columbia CL 2007, CS KWI7> 
"Happy Days Arc Here Anain." 

IOLK SONGS FROM THE HILLS— 

The SprinKficids (Philips PHM 200-076. 
PMS 60IWI76t "Midnittht Special" (PD) 
(2:25) 

SING ALONG WITH JFK. LAUGH 
ALONG WITH NIXON — Oriainal 
Cast (Reprise R ftOK.T) "Alliance for 
Progress" (1:46) 



St KEEK'S CHOICE— Dick Dale A the 
Dellones (Capitol DT 1X56) "Pepper 
mint Man" (Bloor-Nofiman. RMI) 
(2:12) 

DON'T LET ME CROSS OVER— 

Carl Butler (Columbia CL 2002. CS 
XW>2| "Grief in My Heart" ((iolden 
West. BMI) 12:26) 

THAT STUBBORN KIND A' FELLOW 

— Marvin tiayc (Tamla TM 239) 
"Soldier's Plea" 

TWISTIN' THE JUG — (icne Ammons 
(Prcsliec PR 7238) "Just Friends" 
(ASCAP) 



JA/./. PREMIERE: WASHINGTON — 

Paul Winter Sestet (Columbia CL 
IW7. CS X7V7) "Shenandoah" 

MISTY— Eddie (Lockjaw) Davis with 
Shirley Scott "Twistina the Jun" 
(Prestige. BMI) 



I.Y'NN GOLD — Warner Bros. (W MVS. 
WS 1495) "I Once Loved a Boy" 

THE BEGINNING — Josh While (Mer- 
cury Mli 20724. SR 60724) "Evil 
Hearted Man" (Fmary. ASCAP) (J:J5) 



KHVIHM A BIIKS 

BOSSA NOVA £ BLUES— Freddy 
King (King X2I) "One Hundred 
Years" (Pandora. BMI) (2:20) 



HAM) 

MANCINI MARCHES— Henry Mancini 
conducts Warner Bros. Band (War- 
ner Bros. W 1491. WS 1491) "The 
Billboard March" 



MIDDLE-ROAD SINGLES 

Not too far out in either direction, the following singles, selected from the current Hoi 100, 
art th* most popular middle-road records of the week. Rank order here is based on relative 
standing in the Hot 100. 



This 


last 


Week 


Weak 


1 

2 


1 
2 


3 


3 


4 


4 


5 


7 


6 


9 


7 


5 


8 


6 


9 


14 


10 


13 


tl 


10 


12 


19 


13 


15 


14 


20 


IS 


18 


16 


16 


17 


8 


18 


17 


19 


12 


20 


11 



Frem this walk's Bal 1ft 
TITLE AKTIST, LABEL 



Weeks 
Hoi 100 



THE END OF THE WORLD, Skeeler Djvis. RCA Victor 8098 9 

RHYTHM OF THE RAIN, Cascades. Valiant 6026 II 

WHAT Will HV HART SAY, Johnny Mathis. Columbia 42666 9 

OUR WINTER LOVE, Bill Pursed. Columbia 42619 8 

I WANNA BE AROUND, Tony Bennett. Columbia 42634 tl 

ALL I HAVE TO DO IS DREAM. Richard Chamberlain. MGM 13121 7 

WALK RIGHT IN, Rooftop Singers. Vanguard 35017 12 

GREENBACK DOLLAR, Kingston Trio. Capitol 4898 9 

CAN'T GET USED TO LOSING YOU, Andy Williams. Columbia 42674 4 

FOLLOW THE BOYS, Connie Francis. MGM 13127 4 

DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES, Henry Mancini. RCA Victor 8120 9 

YOUNG LOVERS, Paul i Paula. Philips 40096 2 

LOVE FOR SALE, Arthur Lyman Gioup, Hi Fi 5066 8 

PUFF, Peter. Paul S Mary, Warner Bros. 5348 2 

OVER THE MOUNTAIN (Across the See), Bobby Vinton, Epic 9577 3 

DON'T BE AFRAID, LITTLE DARLIN', Steve Lawrence. Columbia 42699 . . . 3 

FROM A JACK TO A KING, Ned Miller. Fabor 114 13 

ALL OVER THE WORLD, Nat King Cole. Capitol 4919 4 

FLY ME TO THE MOON — BOSSA NOVA, Joe Harnell and Oik. Kapp 497 1} 

CAST YOUR FATE TO THE WIND, Vince Guaraldi Trio. Fantasy 563 16 



YESTERYEAR'S HITS 



Chang* -of -pace programming from your librarian's shelves, featuring th* disks 
that were the hottest in th* land five years ago and ten years ago this w**k. 
Her#'i how they ranked in the Billboard's chart at that tim«: 



I. 



POP- 10 Years Ago 
March 21, 1953 

Pago, 



POP-5 Years Ago 
March 24, 1958 

1. Tequila, the Champs, Challenge 

2. Sweet LlHIt Sixteen, Chuck Bernf, Chen 

3. Lollipop, Chordetlei. Cadence 

4. It's Toe Soon lo Know, Pat Boone, Dot 

5. Who's Sorry Now, Connie Francis, MGM 

6. Don't, E. Preiley, RCA Victor 

7. Catch a Falling Star, Perry Como, 
BCA Victor 

S. Twenty Si* Miles, Four Preps, Capitol 
9. Oh, Julie, Crescendo!, Nasco 
10. Sail Along SlfVry Moon, 
Billy Vaughn, Dot 

RHYTHM & BLUES-5 Years Ago-March 24, 1958 
Sweet Little Sixteen, C. Berry. Chen 
Tequila, the Champs, Challenge 
Short Shorh, Royal Teens, ABC Paramount 
Oh, Julie, Crescendos, Nasco 
6et a Job, Silhouettes, Ember 



Doggie in the Window, P. 
Mercury 

2. Till I Welti Again With You, 
T. Brewer, Coral 

3. Don't Lit the Sim 6et in Toer Eyes, 
P. Como, RCA Victor 

4. I Believe, F. Laine, Columbia 

5. Tell He You're Mine, Gaylords, Mercury 

6. Pretend, N. K. Cole, Capitol 

7. Your ChNtiR' Heart. J. James, MGM 

8. Wild Hones, P. Como, RCA Victor 

9. Side by Side. K. Starr, Capitol 
tO. Have You Heard! J. James, MGM 



Lollipop, Chordettes, Cadence 
Don't, E. Presley. RCA Victor 
Twenty-Si.. Miles, Four Preps, Capitol 
Good Golly, Hiss Molly, Little Richard, 

Specialty 
Breathless, Jerry Lee Lewis, Sun 




Al * 

Martino } 

I Love You 
Because 

f b/w Merry-Co-Round I 

Music arranged & conducted A 
by Bel ford Hendricks A 





# 



4930 



S 



2 minutes & 40 seconds of smash-hit single! 



Aw 

Al's current best selling album S(T) 1774 



the exciting vale* or 



m"tiT'"n 

m 



FOR 
THE 

■ 

Demon 



Advertising Pages 



a presentation 
of facts 
about the four 
music-record weeklies, 
based on 7962 
performance. 



The following display advertising compari- 
sons give all the advantages to the other 
three music-record weeklies. Billboard's fig- 
ures come from actual billing records, 
whereas those of other publications were 
based on actual measurements which do not 
take into consideration advertisements pub- 
lished as adjustments for errors, or unpaid 
for other reasons. The figures apply to 
display advertising only. No classified ad- 
vertising space, paid or unpaid, is included. 

But let's not stop there. There are others — 
and still more important — measurements of 
the value of a publication to advertisers. 



Publication 



Billboard 



Cash Box 



Music Reporter 



Music Vendor 



1962 Display 
Advertising Pages 



1730 



1667 



645 



399 




Dollars of Advertising: 

Where an industry invests the greatest share of its advertising dollars 
is accepted as the most significant area of comparison of the advertising 
worth of the publications in any field. Here are the facts about adver- 
tising dollars invested in the music-record tradepaper field: 


Fact #1 


More dollars of advertising were ip«nt in Billboard, in 1962, 
than in all the others combined. 


Fact #2 


Billboard's margin, over paper 3 2, is o whopping one-third 
of a million dollars! — some $370,000 more, to be exoctl 


Fact #3 


Advertisers spent more for tingles advertising in Billboard! 


Fact #4 


Advertisers spent more for Ip advertising in Billboard) 


Fact #5 


Talent spent more for advertising in Billboard! 


Fact #6 


Advertisers spent more for "all other" musk-record adver- 
tising in Billboard (music publisher, record services and 
supplies, distributors, one-stops, etc.). 



VOX JOX 

By GIL FAGGEN 



NAME'S THE SAME: All air 
personnel at KALO, Little Rock, 
have taken the station's call 
letters as their last name. Little 
Rock listeners now hear the 
Gene KALO Show, Johnny 
KALO Show, Billy KALO 
Show, David KALO Show, and 
Jim KALO Show, according to 
Jim Gaines, program director. 
Will unmarried men of KALO 
have to appear to the FCC for a 
marriage license when the time 
comes? . . . WWDC's Art Brown 
has been doing his 6 to 10 a.m. 
show from Washington's Doc- 
tor's Hospital. Brown fractured 
his leg back in 1960 and aired 
his show from his bedside at 
home. The same injury put him 
in the hospital this time. 

CHARGE! Bill Calder, early- 
morning deejay at KHJ, Holly- 
wood, has inaugurated a "wake 
up" session on his daily program. 
Listeners send in names on 
cards and letters, and every 
morning at 8:15, Calder blows 
a kookie bugle a la Army rev- 
eille, then calls out the names 
of those people to be wakened. 
. . . Bob Wolke, program di- 
rector and air personality at 
KBER, San Antonio, is recuper- 
ating from surgery in Houston's 
Methodist Hospital. Eddie Dan- 
iels is handling Bob's air stint. 
. . . Ted Rodgers, host of WDBJ 
"Musical Clock" program, sa- 
lutes one of the IS Roanoke, 
Va., junior or high school bands 
every morning. 

WALK ON, WALK ON 

KRIZ airmen Tony Evans and 
Jack Frost gave up on their 
attempted 50-mile jaunt from 
Phoenix after hoofing it 37 



miles. Evans and Frost panted 
in desperation, "when JFK does 
12 miles at a stretch, well com- 
plete our 50." (Incidentally, 
KRIZ has been granted approval 
to boost power from 250-watt 
to 1,000 watts). ... A march-a- 
thon was tried by Wayne Corey 
and John Meder of WBCH, 
Hastings, Mich. The boys 
had a Navy recruiter call cad- 
ence while they marched around 
downtown Hastings accompanied 
by the drum section from the 
high school band. After 11 
miles Corey and Meder were 
forced to quit by a combina- 
tion of blisters and sharp pains. 
They now rival Sousa as the 
"march kings. . . . Dick Shcphcns 
WAVZ, New Haven, who re- 
portedly started the opposition 
movement — "Sit-A-Thon," is 
now planning to get away from 
it all with broadcast tours of 
famous haunted houses. . . . Top- 
per to all this is the stunt pulled 
by WFPG afternoon d.j. Jim 
Rodio, who broadcasts through- 
out his entire walk-a-thon on At- 
lantic City's famed boardwalk. 

ST. PATRICK'S DAY pro- 
motions around the country: 
KQV, Pittsburgh, awarded a 
$50 Savings Bond to the lis- 
tener who sent in the most in- 
teresting drawing of "the KQV 
Leprechaun," described by Neil 
Maclntyre as three feet high and 
Irish. . . .WTRY, Troy, is also on 
the leprechaun kick. It awarded 
a WTRY leprechaun to the 
listener who submitted the long- 
est list of song titles including 
the word "green." What the 
listener actually received was 
domestic help in the home for 
one week KALL, Salt Lake 



City, invited all their listeners 
to turn green for St. Pat prizes. 
KALL personalities Will Lucas 
and Paul Smith promised to 
turn green for the listener com- 
pleting the phrase, "Everytime 
I hear Paul Smith-Will Lucas 
I tum green because. . . ." 

AT YOUR SERVICE. . . . 
WRCV's Pat Landon emseed 
the 13th international festival 
ball, held recently in Philadel- 
phia to raise funds for the in- 
ternational House. . . . WINS, 
N. v., honored the nation's larg- 
est fire department with live 
pick-ups from fire department 
headquarters throughout the 
entire broadcast day. The salute 
was the first of a monthly series 
presented by the station, spot- 
lighting New York's fire, police 
and other service arms. . . . 
WTKO, Ithica, is soliciting con- 
tributions for the "Debby Fund." 
A seven-year-old Seneca Falls 
girl, Deborah Macuccila, lost 
both legs in a school bus acci- 
dent several weeks ago. . . . 
WIBG's Hy Lit will stage a 
benefit hop at Philadelphia Con- 
vention Hall on May 5 — bene- 
fit City of Hope Hospital Cen- 
ter on the West Coast. 

CHANGE OF SCENE: Sylvia 
Saint Clair, night club person- 
ality and recording artist, is a 
new voice on WCAU, CBS- 
Radio, Philadelphia, for a night- 
ly "Sylvia by Night Show." . . 
Roy Elwell has been added to 
KHJ, Hollywood "Musical Sun- 
day line-up. Elwell is a former 
KRLA and KQV d.j. Jim 
Dunbar, currently cmsecing the 
10 a.m. to noon show on WLS, 
moves to KGO, San Francisco, 
as program director. Bob Hale 
will take over Dunbar's show. 
. . . Larry Schenbly, program 
director, KGUN-TV, Tucson, 
moves into account executive 
slot; Jack Jacobson, production 



manager for the station, will 
fill in for Schenbly. . . . Glenn 
C. Lewis moves frrom WDBJ 
show "Music Shop" 3:10 to 6 
p.m., same city. . . . Robert 
Heinlein, WGCD, deejay, takes 
time off to attend radio elec- 
tronics school in D.C. He will 
return to Chester, S. C, May 1. 
. . . Staff changes at WTMA 



AM & FM, Charleston, S. C, 
have been announced by new 
program director Bob Mitchell. 
Al K. Hall takes over 9 a.m. 
to noon slot and Johnny Prince 
brings "The Battle of the New 
Sounds" to S. C, in the after- 
noon. . . . Vlnce Ford, WKMI 
midmorning air personality, 
upped to program director. 



programming 



By BILL GAVIN * Billboard Contributing Editor • Publisher, Bill Gavin's Record Report 

WHAT MAKES A GOOD DISK JOCKEY? If there were a 
ready-made answer to this question, legions of station managers 
would be bidding for the formula. The really good disk jockey is 
the key to a station's success. A good staff, co-or- 
dinated by intelligent management, makes the dif- 
ference between top rating and an also-ran status. 

Of all the ingredients that go into making up a 
good DJ, the most important is experience: small 
stations, small towns, working up the ladder of 
better jobs, moving around the country. Some of 
our best DJ's have been registered voters in as 
many as six different cities. Everywhere he goes, 
the DJ leams how to do the job better. When he 
stops learning, he has had it. 

The young DJ learns by listening. He tunes in the best men on 
the big stations nearby. He listens to air checks of his own work. 
Sometimes he has his own tape recorder and experiments in 
voice phrasing and inflection that he wouldn't risk on the air. If 
he's lucky, his PD gives him helpful coaching. If he's wise, he 
listens. 



-A 



WHAT DOES HE LEARN? How to sell. How to read a com- 
mercial. How to punctuate orally, to compress one phrase, to be de- 
liberate with another. He learns how to ad lib, to think ahead, to 
have something to say, to use a few words rather than a few dozen. 
He leams to prepare a show, learns musical values in terms of audi- 
ence tastes rather than his own. Most of all he learns confidence. 
Not the false confidence that comes from a driving ego trying to 
overpower its own defects, but the true confidence that comes from 
an awareness of a job well done. 

How about voice quality? It used to be that announcers had to 
have a rich, resonant baritone. Not any more. A few top paid DJ's 
speak with voices that seem to be filtered through gravel or thick 
gumbo soup. Of course, a pleasant voice is an asset; it's just not 
absolutely essential. Biggest handicap of a mellifluous voice is that 
its owner may be so impressed with it that he seems to be talking to 



C 



Paid Circulation 

Or, how many readers think enough of the 
publication to pay for it. Here are the facts: 


Publication 


Circulation Listing in SRDS*, 
January 1963. 


Billboard 


20,022 Average ABC 
Audited Net Paid 
(6/30/62). 


Cash Box 


"After three requests, publisher has 
failed to file circulation statement 
on SRDS form." 


Music Reporter 


No listing for this publication 
in SRDS at all. 


Music Vendor 


5,610 (sworn 12/31/61). 


*SRDS is the accepted national authority for statistical data 
on publications. Its purpose is to serve the needs of advertising 
buyers in all fields. 

SUMMARY: Billboard has more paid circulation (and the only 
audited paid circulation) than all others combined! 




Editorial Services 



Advertising Effectiveness 

Or, is your advertising really producing for you. This is a key area of 
evaluation and here's a picture of what's available for advertisers in 
this area. 


Publication 


Type of Advertising Effectiveness Research Available. 


Billboard 


Two full studies: (1) Big-city markets; 
(2) Grass-roots markets. 

Two pilot studies on LP advertising effectiveness. 


Cash Box 


None. 


Music Reporter 


None. 


Music Vendor 


None. 




Comparisons are needless here. 
Billboard is the acknowledged leader. 

Billboard is the acknowledged spokesman for the industry, as 
(probably) even Billboard's competitors will agree. 

Billboard editorial data and research is used, universally and 
almost exclusively, in and out of the music-record industry. 

Billboard is the source of industry statistics — used by govern- 
ment agencies, major consumer publications, newspaper editors 
and columnists, and virtually all sales and management execu- 
tives of record manufacturers. 

Ask any experienced professional in the industry. 



Billboard 
Leadership 




unquestioned in '62, and 

growing greater in '63 



Hi 



Stations Get Bad Taste in Mouth 

Continued from page 42 



ires on the government and its 
officialdom by comedian Mort 
Sahl and Bob Newhart," he 
said. 

In a recent "Minnesota Poll" 



taken by The Minneapolis Trib- 
une, readers were asked, "Would 
you say it is or is not in 
good taste for entertainers to do 
imitations of the President and 



his family?" Only 33 per cent 
of the adults thought it was in 
good taste; 52 per cent said it 
was not; and 14 per cent had 
no opinion. However, when the 
question was asked as to 
whether or not they enjoyed the 
imitations. 71 per cent of the 
men and 67 per cent of the 
women said they did. 



TURNTABLE TIPS 



BIG BOMBS CONTINUE: 

Recently personal appearances 
in show business have added 
up to a big goose egg for local 
promoters. For example, the 



newsletter 



himself. The voice that is flexible may have a hard time learning not 
to overinflect. 

Most successful disk jockeys are active in some phases of com- 
munity life. They get to know people — take a real interest in what's 
going on. It isn't just a matter of mixing with the kids at hops and 
picking up on their musical preferences. What counts is becoming 
a part of the community, so that listeners are aware that the DJ is 
interested in them and what they do. Such community identification 
of its staff is a priceless asset for a radio station. 

SO IT TAKES hard work, voice, experience and community 
involvement to make a good disk jockey. It takes something more 
to be a great one — something that is almost impossible to develop 
without a native talent. That something is the intangible talent for 
pleasing an audience which is called showmanship. On a stage, 
facing a live audience, it isn't too difficult for the performer to be 
aware of his audience, to respond to it. to control its moods. Behind 
a microphone, with an unseen audience, the task of radio showman- 
ship is infinitely more demanding. 

Is anyone laughing at the jokes? Is anybody saying "Aw, what 
a square?" How many hands are reaching to switch the dial to an- 
other station? The disk jockey doesn't know; he won't find out until 
the next ratings come in. What's more, if he worries about these 
things, he'll begin losing confidence in his own judgment and his 
work will suffer. 

The radio showman has a special "feel" for his audience. Some 
instinct tells him he's on the right track. He sparks with ideas. The 
audience is there. They like him. He likes them. His job is fun, 
and he makes it sound that way every day. He is a showman. He 
is a great DJ — tops in his profession. 

He makes — or soon will make — a lot of money. He is worth 
every penny of it. 

PERSONAL NOTE: l.ast week's column has already brought 
much reader comment. Several people have asked if their ideas 
might be quoted here, the answer is yes! We have invited comment 
from those broadcasters to whom our open letter was addressed. In 



addition, other pertinent views are most welcome. Please airmail 
your letters to me at: 114 Sansome Street. San Francisco. 

'BEST SIDE STORY' 

Atlanta (Mike Holliday-WQXl): Heavy phone requests: "The 
Reverend Mr. Black" (Kingston Trio-Capitol LP). May be released 
us as single. 

Philadelphia (Hy Lit-WIBG): Big Breakouts: "What a Guy" 
(Raindrops-Jubilee) and "You Should Have Been There" (Fleetwoods- 
Dolton). 

Pittsburgh (Sir Walter Raleigh-WAMO): Impressive acceptance 
of "The Love of My Man" (Theola Kilgore- Seroc). 

Baltimore (Larry Monroe-WCAO): Big sales gain for "Locking 
Up My Heart" (Marvelettes-Tamla) — a former discovery. 

Boston (Arnie Ginsburgh-WMEX): Gaining fast: "Heart" (Ken 
Chandler-Laurie) and "Mecca" (Gene Pitney-Musicor). 

Milwaukee (George Michael-WRIT): Every retail outlet in the 
area reports good sales on "Pipeline" (Shantays Dot). Top pick: "The 
Fool" (Jamie Coc-Btg Top). 

Minneapolis (Red Jones-WDGY): Gaining fast: "Don't Say 
Nothin' Bad" (The Cookies-Dimension). Taking off: "Surfin' U.S.A." 
( Beachboys-Capitol). 

Chicago (Gene Taylor-WLS): Gaining fast: "Linda" (Jan and 
Dean-Liberty). Picks: "Arabia" (Delcos-Showcase) and "Play Those 
Oldies" (Anthonv and the Sophomores-Mercury). 

Stockton (Ken Wing-WJOY): Pick the Side: "Would Yoj Come 
Back" (Eddie Hodges-Columbia). Big winner over flip. Looks strong! 

Fresno (Johnny Hyde-KYNO): Big requests and good sales. "My 
Father's Voice" (Judy Lynn-United Artists). 

Sacramento (Buck Herry-LROY): Top 5: "Cu Cu Rru Cu Cu 
Paloma" (Nancy Ames-Liberty). 

Top Tips From Around (he Nation: "Prima Donna" (Glen 
Campbell-Capitol), "He's a Bad Boy" (Carole King-Dimension), "To- 
day I Met the Boy I'm Gonna Marry" (Darlene Love-Phillcs), 
"Ronnie, Call Me!" (Shelley Fabares-Colpix.) 



Mills Brothers and Count Basie 

and band along with other 
attractions lost promoter Dee 
Campbell of Dayton, Ohio, a 
bundle on dates in Dayton and 
Columbus. We hear the loss on 
the two dates is between $9,000 
and $10,000. 

Then Homer and Jethxo, with 
a modem band and a modern 
show, dropped about three 
grand on a date three weeks 
back. (Perhaps it would have 
been better if Homer and Jethro 
had appeared with a good 
country and folk music festival 
rather than a big band.) 

Allan Sherman lost a lot of 
money on his Cincinnati date 
and the Feld Brothers did very 
poorly with the Vaughn Mead- 
er show in Norfolk. Meader. 
by the way, did 550 paid ad- 
missions in Toledo. The recent 
Jackie Wilson-Bobby Rydell 
show did not make money in 
Pittsburgh, also dropped money 
the following night in Cincinnati. 

We could go on and on and 
on but we guess you get the 
message — the glamour and the 
glitter of show business isn't all 
that it's cracked up to be at 
the box office. 



PEOPLE AND PLACES: 

Europe seems to be the rage in 
the record business these days. 
Marve Schlatter and his wife 
arc visiting the European shores 
as are Berry Gordy Jr. and 
Barney Ales. Meanwhile, back 
at the ranch. Florence Green- 
berg holds down the front office 
at Scepter and Irv Biegel fills 
the hill for B.G. and Ales. 



aterial 



46 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 



Phono -Tape 



Magnavox Sales Soar as Basic 
No-Discount Policy Holds Firm 

By NICK BIRO 

CHICAGO — Getting a Magnavox radio, phonograph or television set at a discount is virtually 
unheard of. In fact, any dealer caught selling a Magnavox below list can usually start looking for 
another line. He won't have Magnavox for too long. 



That's one of the hasic philos- 
ophies behind a firm whose 
sales have soared 440 per cent 
in the past decade to $202 mil- 
lion in 1962. For the next three 
years, Magnavox is predicting a 
100 per cent increase over its 
1962 level. 

In an era where discounting 
of radio, phonograph and tele- 
vision sets is more a rule than 
an exception, Magnavox stands 
as a lone holdout for the full 
list philosophy. 

Jim Shallow, co-ordinator of 
marketing, puts it simply. "We 
don't believe in the principle of 
discounting and we won't sell 
to a discounter." Why? Noth- 
ing more complicated than 
*. . . we want our dealers to stay 
in business." 

Discount Spells Loss 

Shallow has some impressive 
statistics to back up his point. 
Last year, he notes, discounters 
in the appliance field repre- 
sented some 2 per cent of total 
retail failures but they totaled 
some 21 per cent of dollars lost. 

In 1962, notes Shallow, some 
146 discounters went bankrupt 
with liabilities of some $75 mil- 
lion. 

Magnavox simply feels it han- 
dles a "cream" line of merchan- 
dise and it doesn't want to get 
caught up in the discounting 
hassle. 

The firm shuns distributors 
and sells directly to some 2.000 
franchised dealers. 

Getting a franchise is not sim- 
ple. The dealer has to be in 
an area where he doesn't con- 
flict with another Magnavox 



KNOCK, KNOCK 

Audio Man 
Raps Demos 

NEW YORK — The much- 
maligned record industry has 
been blasted again, this time by 
an irate audio dealer who claims 
that "the record industry has 
failed to provide dealers with a 
demonstration record that truly 
answers our needs." 

Bill Colbert, head of the 
local hi-fi chain known as Audio 
Exchange, said, "There's a cry- 
ing need for a demo record of 
top quality that offers a wide 
variety of kinds of music. This 
record should have 20 hands on 
it. offering everything from Bach 
to jazz to show tunes. It doesn't 
have to be sold at a low price. 
We'll pay good money for a 
record that's well made and 
offers an exciting sound." 

"Today," Colbert continued, 
"we're selling components that 
are expensive, top-quality prod- 
ucts, some of them worth four 
or five thousand dollars, yet the 
records we must demonstrate 
them with arc substandard. We 
have to plead with customers 
to listen to the system, not the 
scratches. 

"On top of all that, having 
no single record to do the job 
means keeping a whole slew of 
them on hand. It's infuriating 
and an archaic way of doing 
business. Won't some record 
company come to our help? The 
one that does will make a lot of 
friends for itself." 



franchise and he has to guanin- 
teen a certain retail sales figure 
per year. An annual figure of 
$35,000 on the Magnavox line 
is usually a minimum. 

Prerequisites 
Other points include: 

1. Carrying a quality store 
image. 

2. Agreeing to carry a certain 
number of floor models on the 
full Magnavox line. 

3. Adhering to the corporate 
advertising policy. Dealers are 
furnished mats and are expected 
to do a certain amount of local 
advertising. They also earn ad 
credits from Magnavox accord- 
ing to their volume of purchases. 

4. Meeting the dealer's sales 
quota. "If the dealer has the 
franchise just for the sake of 
habit, we get rid of him," 
Shallow notes. 

5. And last but not least — 



maintaining a list price on all 
Magnavox proucts. 
Magnavox products, 
sition. Shallow noted that in re- 
turn for the dealer fulfilling his 
part of the bargain, Magnavox 
also does its share of the mar- 
keting job. 

The firm spends over $5 mil- 
lion per year on national adver- 
tising in spot radio, television, 
national magazines such as Life, 
Look, Time. Saturday Evening 
Post and Television Guide, and, 
of course, its co-operative cam- 
paign with dealers in the daily 
press. 

Its spot radio campaign alone 
consists of some 42 spots per 
week on some 180 FM radio 
stations around the country — a 
total of almost 8,000 spots per 
week. 

Magnavox also conducts two 
Continued on pane 4H 



Norelco 'Continental' Line 








NORTH AMERICAN PHILIPS has produced a line of eight sepa- 
rate accessories for its Continental line of tape recorders. De- 
signed to broaden the usefulness of the equipment, the acces- 
sory line includes such items as a foot control, AC house current 
adaptor, monitoring headsets, carrying cases, carrying cover 
and dual mike adaptor. 



Zenith Rondo 
'Drift-Free 

CHICAGO — Zenith Sales 
Corporation has announced a 
new design concept in stereo 
FM table-top radio with the 
introduction of the model known 
as the Rondo. The unit is part 
of a package which includes 
seven new "home entertainers" 
for 1963. 

The Rondo has regular FM 
with "drift-free" tuning, AM re- 
ception and twin seven by five 
speakers which can he detached 
for up to 20 feet of separation. 
The set has a line cord antenna, 
provision for external antenna 
and can be used with a tape 
recorder. 



Columbia Bows 
Nine New Tapes 

NEW YORK — Columbia Rec- 
ords has marketed nine new 
four-track stereo tapes, including 
four pop and five Masterworks 
items. The pop series includes 
material by Dave Brubeck, Pete 
Seeger. the New Christy Min- 
strels and Jerry Murad's Har- 
monica's. 

On the classical side, there is 
product by Bruno Walter and 
the Columbia Symphony. Leon- 
ard Bernstein and the New York 
Philharmonic, Glenn Gould, the 
Philadelphia Orchestra with Ku- 
gene Ormandy, and the Mor- 
mon Tabernacle Choir with 
Eugene Ormandy. 



MERCHANDISING 



• BEST SELIINO PHONOS • DISK 
• EQUIPMENT NEWSLETTER 



NG 



Servicemen Best 
Salesmen in Town 



WASHINGTON — How lo 
sell expensive stereo phono- 
graphs, tape recorders, and 
combinations at full list price? 

"Sell them through the serv- 
ice department" says Harold 
Smith of Smith Radio & TV 
here. 

In an area which features 
as violent a competition for the 
consumer dollar as any city in 
the country, the Smith organi- 
zation does a $ 1 80.000-a-year 
volume, all of it at list price. It 
doesn't matter that discount de- 
partment stores, discount spe- 
cialty shops, etc., in the area 
may be offering prices anywhere 
from 10 to 25 per cent lower. 
Smith sticks religiously to list 
price, and gets the sale. 

The secret is simply "selling 
through the service department" 
— a service department so 
thoroughly trusted and well 
known that Smith can set a 
minimum charge for estimates 
on repairs, and collect it whether 
the customer decides to go 
ahead with the repair or not. 
For example, when the service 
shop, with four expert mechan- 
ics, and two well-equipped 
"rolling shops" accepts a service 
call on a balky stereo phono- 
graph, the customer is billed 
$12.50 for the estimate, the 
amount, of course, subtracted 
from the final statement. Few 
service firms could successfully 
demand this advance fee, but 
because every man is a prac- 
ticing expert, and because un- 
conditional guarantees go with 
every repair, Smith is able to 
do so. 

Next, an unusual feature of 



Special Promosh 
Campaign Marks 
1st TV Set Sale 



NEW YORK — The sale of the 
first TV receiver 25 years ago 
by the Allen B. Dumont Lab- 
oratories will be commemorated 
this spring by the successor Du- 
Mont Division of Emerson 
Radio, in the form of a special 
spring promotion. 

The campaign will encompass 
both TV and stereo phono- 
graphs, according to advertising 
and sales manager Gene Van 
Cleve. with dealers to be fur- 
nished with a barrage of extra 
promotion tools. 

Special promotion kits being 
supplied dealers, will include 
over-the-wirc banners and side 
panels, counter cards and hang- 
tags, dealer newspaper ad mats, 
copy for radio and TV spots, 
publicity releases and other di- 
versified sales aids, 
the Smith service organization 
is (hat all of his service mechan- 
ics arc actually salesmen as well. 
In the customer's home, making 
a repair, and getting a thorough 
line on what the customer's in- 
terests may be, the salesman- 
mechanic has an excellent op- 
portunity to recommend specific 



equipment, and to sell it on the 
spot. 

He's paid the same com- 
missions as would apply to a 
full-time salesman, and he can 
write up a contract there and 
then. Few prospects arc likely 
to argue with a well-equipped, 
well-dressed service mechanic, 
who has already probed into the 
old equipment with his repair 
kit. In this way, more than half 
of the total stereo equipment 
sales volume is sold by the 
service mechanics. 

"There's no question but 
what each of our men is really 
a salesman," Smith said. "But, 
before they could qualify as 
salesmen, each man had to be 
an electronics expert. They are 
among some of the best paid 
men in the entire industry, be- 
cause, of course, their selling 
opportunities are far better than 
those of the average specialty 
salesman, and because full-list 
sales provide a large enough 
cushion of profit to pay the 
salesman a worthwhile com- 
mission." 



Record RCA 
Ad Budget 

NEW YORK— A record first- 
half advertising and sales pro- 
motion budget is being used in 
a major promotion for home en- 
tainment equipment by the RCA 
Sales Corporation, according to 
J. M. (Jack) Williams, vice- 
president in charge of advertis- 
ing. 

A special "pick-of-the-porta- 
blcs" campaign will tout porta- 
ble TV, stereo phones, transis- 
tor radios and the new RCA 
compact cartridge tape record- 
ers. This part of the drive will 
concentrate on the April-May 
selling season with heavy use of 
TV. radio and newspaper sched- 
ules in local markets through 
distributor and dealer co-op 
programs. 

The portable promotion fol- 
lows Victor's "Bargain Bonanza" 
retail campaign now being con- 
cluded. Williams said these two 
campaigns alone represent a 
record concentration of ad ap- 
propriations for a first-half cam- 
paign. 

The portable drive, in addi- 
tion to local co-op coverage, 
will also include ads in Life, 
Look, the Reader's Digest, Time, 
The New Yorker and Sports 
Illustrated. There will also he 
a series of commercials on Walt 
Disney's "Wonderful World of 
Color" TV outings. 

A heavy amount of dealer dis- 
play material has also been de- 
vised to tie in with the cam- 
paign. Williams added. 



Cop; 



MARCH 23. 1963 



BILLBOARD 47 



Unsurpassed in Quality at any Puce 



Made in the famous studios and 
laboratories of James J. Kriegsmann 
GENUINE 8"xl0" 



equipment newsletter 




By DAVID LACHENBRUCH • Billboard Contributing Editor • Managing Editor, Television Digest 




A DIVISION Of JAMES J. KRIEGSMANN 



165 W. 46lh St. NEW YORK 36. N. Y. 




DISTINCTIVE 
PICTURE 
FRAMES 

JOSEPH MAYER CO., INC. 

S UNION SOUABf WfST, NfW YOU* 3. N V 
ALGONQUIN 5 76** 



MINUTES OF AN IMAGINARY MEETING. The Federal 
Trade Commission is still searching for that elusive definition of 
high fidelity — preferably one that will satisfy all equipment makers 
and protect the public at the same time. Sugges- 
tions have been submitted to the FTC from industry 
groups, manufacturers and the public. There will 
be informal industry-government conferences at the 
FTC to further narrow down the differences. Here 
is an abridged transcript of one imaginary meeting, 
which never took place: 

FTC EXAMINER: The purpose of this meet- 
ing is to weigh suggestions on how to protect the 
public in the sale of high fidelity phonographs. 
When an individual buys equipment advertised as high fidelity, it's 
our duty to be sure he gets the real thing. We all know that high 
fidelity means, generally, "as close as possible to the original sound." 
How can we implement this with a specific definition? 

MURRAY MEGOHM, president, Audio-Oscilloscope Compo- 
nents, Inc.: Gentlemen, this discussion will call for a high level of 
industry statesmanship. Therefore, I must point out that only the 
highest quality components can provide true high fidelity. Our 
proposal is a simple one. I have here the spec sheets for our own 
AOC-I tuner, AOC-II amplifier, AOC-IV turntable and AOC-V 
speaker system. Since these components are the standard of the 
industry, I respectfully request that these specifications be incor- 
porated in FTC's standards. 

Any equipment which doesn't meet these specifications obviously 
hasn't earned the right to be called high fidelity, and our equipment 
is the only equipment which meets them. Accordingly, we have 
registered the phrase "High Fidelity" as the trade-mark for our 
audio products. 

(Shouts of "throw him out!" "Lynch him!) 

HARRY SCHLOCK, executive vice-president, Mellograph Com- 
pany of America: I resent the implication by my colleague, Mr. 
Megohm. What is called for here is a high level of industry 
statesmanship. Mr. Megohm's definition would stifle the progress 
of the industry. We at Mellowgraph have developed, and have 
been using for years, our own definition of high fidelity, which we 
now offer to share with the industry. It's named after our chief 
engineer, Vladimir Grunt, and is known as the Grunt Test. It's 
simple and easy to police, and we propose it as the standard for 
high fidelity goods. Here's how it works: If it grunts, it's high 
fidelity. 

(Confusion and murmuring. Mr. Schlock is ejected.) 

FERGUS GROMMET, chief engineer, Phlegmatic Industries 
Corporation: More heat than light has been generated here so far. 



It's time for some industry statesmanship — a high level of it, to be 
exact. We must object to both proposed definitions. Mr. Megohm's 
definition would deny to thousands of average-income Americans 
the benefits of high fidelity. The worker is the backbone of our 
country and he deserves to be able to buy phonographs which are 
labeled "high fidelity." On the other hand, Mr. Schlock's Grunt 
Test would lead to standards which are too low and give no 
protection at all to the public. Under the Grunt Test, any $14.95 
phonograph could qualify as high fidelity. 

In the spirit of industry statesmanship, we propose a compromise 
definition of high fidelity: Any phonograph whose list price is over 
$15.95! 

FIRST VOICE: Make it $19.95. 
SECOND VOICE: $29.95. 
THIRD VOICE: $34.50. 

FTC EXAMINER: $34.50 has been bid. Do I hear $39.95? 
Going . . . going. . . . 

FISTULA FARADAY, president, Faraday Fidelity, Inc.: Just a 
minute. This discussion calls for a high level of industry statesman- 
ship. We all know that certain characters in our midst have stolen 
the name "high fidelity" from our industry. The definitions proposed 
so far have been an insult to the American people. Many of them 
might have been applied in George Washington's day. The danger 
is that any definition arrived at today might not be good enough, 
and might tend to freeze the development of the audio art. There- 
fore, we are submitting a proposal which can be met by none of 
today's equipment. 

It's very simple: Absolutely flat response from zero to 100,000 
cycles, plus or minus zero db, with zero per cent distortion. This will 
mean that we'll all have to stop using the words "high fidelity" until 
we can really live up to it. This will call for a high level of 
industry statesmanship and give us something to shoot for. Some 
day we will attain this elusive goal of true high fidelity. 

FERGUS GROMMET: Ha! We got that now! For $15.95 
suggested list! Certified to meet any standards by Phlegmatic Indus- 
tries Corporation Consumer Testing Lab! You want statesmanship? 
We give you statesmanship! 

FTC EXAMINER (rapping gavel): Order, please! 

CHARLIE LIVING, president, Living Music Phonograph 
Company: Gentlemen, I respond to the call of Mr. Faraday for 
industry statesmanship, and wish to announce that the Living Music 
Phonograph Company will, as of the firt of next month, voluntarily 
cease and desist from use of the term "high fidelity" to describe its 
products. (Vast murmur in the hall.) I also wish to announce that 

Continued on page 49 



WE GOOFED! 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

"SEAGRAM'S" IS NOW 

"SEAGREEN" 

THE VICEROYS 



BETHLEHEM =3045 



tW>* 



Itv 



NOW, IT IS BREAKING FOR A HIT! 



^ e i C °'' s ^ G «ft»^ e ' (Regional Breakout in Chicago; 

*° s d **> e 9 \ "Sea- m 

trft^JtS WLS, WDDC, WCAL, WING, KEEL, KOKY, 

Vr^" p H^ or WXYZ, WJLB, WIBG, WAKY, WJNR, etc., on and on.) 

\ o9 o r£2*»d ° ot * e ,n ^° we change the name. 

"I?.'' 1 All stations have been reserviced. 



,it\e- 



Remember, Bethlehem -3045 is now "SEAGREEN" by the VICEROYS. 



KING RECORDS 



1540 Brewster Avenue 
Cincinnati, Ohio— Phone: PL 1-2211 



Copyrighted 



48 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 



Billboard Buyers & Sellers 



msm 



A convenient market place for the best to greet of equipment, supplies, services and 
personnel . . . serving more than 20,000 buyers, sellers, and users of music, records, tapes, 
home entertainment equipment, coin machines and many other related products throughout 
the entire world. 



DISTRIBUTING SERVICES 



RECORD DISTRIBUTORS 




way out in front in Florida 

ONE AMONG MANY 

Ned Miller— Fabor 

HAMBONE 

Sandy Becker— Okey 

GIVE HER MY BEST 

Jimmy Beaumont — May 

MARCHING THROUGH 
MADRID 

The Tijuana Brass— A & M 

HE'S A BAD BOY 

Carol King — Dimension 

TOPPS DISTRIBUTING CO., INC. 

NEW ADDRESS: 
2233 N.W. Fifth Ave.. Miami 37, Fla. 
Code 305, FRanklin 4-8166 



HAYDN SOCIETY 
RECORDS 

ARE NOW AVAILABLE 
TO QUALITY DEALERS 
FROM COAST-TO-COAST 

Send for current catalog 

ESOTERIC, INCORPORATED 

P. O. BOX 1799 
HARTFORD, CONN. 

National Dlitributon for 
HAYDN SOCIETY RECORDS 



NATIONAL DISTRIBUTION 

On your own record labell 
Wire or write 

WORLD WIDE 
RECORD DIST. CO., INC. 

16S0-B Broadway, New York 19, N. V. 



RECORD PROMOTION 
& PUBLICITY 



NATIONAL 
DISTRIBUTION 

Singles & Albums 

"TOP NATION-WIDE 
PROMOTION" 

No tapes, please— 
dubs — records only. 

NATIONAL ENTERTAINMENT CORP. 

2805 Biscayne Boulevard 
Miami, Florida 374-1231 



NATIONAL. AND INTERNATIONAL 
record distribution of singles, albums or 
master records. Producers of recording 
sessions for talent. Thru way Records. 
P. O. Box 788, N. Y. 19, N. Y. 



RECORD MFG. SERVICES, 
SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 

PRESSING, PLATING 



NO JOB TOO SMALL- QUALITY PRESS- 
tng. Low cost. House of Wax, 1697 I 
Broadway, N. Y. C. CI 7-2159. np I 



YOU SHOULD TRY 
JET PRESSED 12" VINYL 

By SHELLEY 

finest product available anywhere 
. . . and it costs no more. Com- 
plete record pressing service. All 
sizes, all speeds, any quantity. 
Mattering, Label Printing, Pressing, 
Drop - Shipping and Warehousing 
are just a few of our many services. 

SHELLEY PRODUCTS, LTD. 

220 Broadway 
Huntington Station, L I., N. Y. 



RECORD PROMOTION 
& PUBLICITY 



NEW OEFICES • NEW LOCATION 
Same great promotion know-how 

JOE PETRALIA 

Record Artists Representative 
Park Sheraton Hotel 

Suite 264 55th St. at 7th Ave. 
New York 19, N. Y. 
Phone: JU 6-6935 



BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 



HAVE YOUR OWN 
BUSINESS 

Ask about our successful plan to put 
you in the Costume Rental business. 
You can operate this business from 
your home or a store. We'll show you 
how to get customers among other 
things. 

Write or call Mr. Slomel 




1113 Walnut St Philadelphia 7, Pa. 
WAfout 3-1395 



THE COMPANY THAT REALLY GOES 
after more business can net more busi- 
ness. Consistent advertising in this Clas- 
sified Mart la a proven economical way 
to arouse Interest, make valuable eon- 
tact* and Increase sales and profits. 
Handy order form printed below for 
your convenience. cb-np 

TURN THAT EXTRA SPACE INTO 
profit with e Kiddle Ride placed on 
percentage basts. Also have excellent 
reconditioning facilities. Write for info. 
Autronlcs Co., 525 N, Noble. Chicago 22. 
Dl. Phone: 226-4322, ap« 



MISCELLANEOUS 



FOR SALE 

Early American 90- foot Ranch House, 
just outside N.Y.C. I'm not "going 
to Chicago." I'm there, and that's 
the reason I'm selling my newly 
remodeled 3-bedroom. 2-bath homo, 
just 35 minutes from New York City 
by car or bus. It's located on the 
side of wooded High Tor Mountain 
in a secluded area. One-quarter acre 
of land. All schools and houses of 
worship nearby. Shown by appoint- 
ment only. Priced for quick sale. 

JOE CERAMI 

91 4 NEw City 4-3087, or in Chicago 
call 312 HArrison 7-5663. 



COMEDY GUIDE" — A FREE 24-PAGE 
book listing "Broadcast Comedy" is 
yours for the asking. Also available is 
a sample copy of "Days. Dates and 
Data" a deejay comedy folio at S3 Write 
today. Show-Biz Comedy Service (Dept. 
MW). 65 Parkway Court. Brooklyn 35, 
New York. my4 



WRITE SONGS? READ "SONG WRITER'S 



tacts. Contests. Features, etc. "Guiding 
Light to Tin Pan Alley." Sample 35c. 
*2750 year. (U. S. A.) mh23 



30.000 PROFESSIONAL COMEDY LINES! 
Monthly topical «ag service too! Free 
catalog. Robert Orbcn, 3536 Daniel 
Crescent, Baldwin Harbor. N. Y. mhl5<e4 



1564 BROADWAY 
N.Y.C. 

Times Square Office 
Space for Rent. 
8700 Square Feet. 

Central Air Conditioning. 
Very Reasonable Rental. 

Contact 

KENNETH LAUB 
of Collins Tuttle & Co. 
261 Madison Ave. 
New York 16, N. Y. 
Telephone: 
MUrrayhill 2-4020 



UNl.Sl.'AI. OPPORTUNITY POP QUAL.I- 
fied Salesmen. Handle outstanding line 
of promotional budget LPs. Good salary 
plus commission, expenses, bonus ar* 
ranscmcnts, etc. Write or call George 
Alpert. Buckingham Records. 630 9th 
Ave.. N. Y. JU 2-0670. ch-mh23 



WANTED 
JR. SALESMAN 

Experienced in phone and moil 
order telling to take charge of 
Claitified Advertising section of 
progressive business publication. 
Please state full qualifications, ex- 
perience and salary requirements. 
All replies in strict confidence. 

BOX 473 

c/o The Billboard 
1564 Broadway, New York 36, N. Y. 



WANTED 

MAN TO HANDLE TOP 
RECORD BUDGET LINE 

Excellent salary, plus expenses, plus 
override. For active, top-grade 
budget record manufacturer. Only 
experienced record salesmen need 
apply. 

Write: BOX 477 

Billboard 

1564 Broadway N. Y. 36, N. Y. 



EMPLOYMENT SECTION 



WANTED 

Musical Entertainment Group 

Non-union, 3 to 6 Men for lone-term 
en cements in Daytona Beach. Fla. Old 
Timer Saloon and Gold Nucjiet Saloon. 

BOX 3577 



SITUATIONS WANTED 



KEY MAN: 8 YEARS" EXPEHIKNCE 
Inside and out. Full knowledge of manu- 
facturers' and distributors' *ale*. pro- 
motion and office management. Willing 
to relocate and/or travel on limited 
basis. Phil Meade, 449 W. 46th St., New- 
York, N. Y. Phone: LT 1-91M. mh23 



HELP WANTED 



MECHANIC — COIN-OPEBATED MUSIC 
and amusement machines. Year-round. 
N. J. seashore resort. State ace, full ex- 
perience and salary dexfred. Shop and 
route work. Box C-B 28, c o Billboard, 
2160 Patterson St.. Cincinnati 14, Ohio. 



DO YOU NEED 
THIS MAN? 

Thorough knowledge in all phases 
of record industry. Hove handled 
sales, distribution, promotion, manu- 
facturing, purchasing, budgeting at 
both field and administrative levels. 
Have experience with both major 
and independent labels. Will travel, 
but home base will be New York. 
Available now for interview. Write 
in confidence to 

BOX 475, Billboard 
1564 Broadway N. Y. 36, N. Y. 



CLASSIFIED RATES 

Per Insertion 





'V 


1" 


2" 


Each Additional Inch 


Manufacturers 
Advertisers 


s» 


SIS 


SJS 


$» 


Distributors & 

Employment 

Advertisers 


«5 


s« 


SIS 


ss 



Minimum size sold is Vj", approximately 35 words; 1" 
70 words. All rates are for EACH advertisement, EACH 
time. Advertisements 2" ar larger set in boxed style. 

If box number is used, allow 10 words for number and 
address. Box number service charge, 50c per insertion. 

USI THIS HANDY AD ORDER BLANK 



Please insert the following ad for 
Classification: 



-consecutive issues. 



□ Set regular classified style. 

□ Amount enclosed 



□ Set boxed classified style. 



Please enclose your payment. We do not bill far classified ads. 



BILLBOARD BUYERS AND SELLERS CLASSIFIED MART 



1564 Broadway 
New York 36, N. Y. 



1920 N. Gowcr St. 
Hollywood 28, Calif 



188 w Randolph St. 
Chicago 1, III. 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

AMBASSADOR 
HAS 75 TAPES 

NEW YORK — Ambassador 
Records has entered the pre- 
recorded tape field, with IS 
different tapes now on the 
market to list at the low price 
level of $3.98. The four-track 
stereo tapes were all recorded 
with full orks and include pop, 
show and movie material, ac- 
cording to Ambassador President 
Ira Moss. Moss said country- 
wide surveys conducted by his 
firm indicated enough interest 
in pre-recorded tape product to 
make low price tape release 
economically feasible. 

iiiiiiiiBiiiiiiiiBiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiintiiiiiiiiiiiiirai 

Atlantic Album 
Sales Up 80% 

NEW YORK — Atlantic Rec- 
ords and its Atco affiliate have 
racked up a 1963 album sales 
plan that ran 80 per cent ahead 
of 1962's winter plan, according 
to spokesmen. The program cov- 
ered six weeks and the diskery 
laid a good deal of the action 
to specific incentives offered in 
the advertising and promotion 
areas. 

Despite a generally soft mar- 
ket, Atlantic and Atco racked 
up the sales by teaming the 
over-all discount of 12'A per 
cent on merchandise, special dis- 
tributor salesmen incentives and 
a special plan whereby the la- 
bels supported distributors' use 
of advertising. 

This plan had the labels pay- 
ing advertising costs equal to 5 
per cent of records purchased 
during the program. Special fea- 
ture here allowed for distributor 
placement of advertising under 
the plan for another 30 days 
despite the conclusion of the 
program February 28. Another 
bonus for dealers was the free 
"Do the Bossa Nova With 
Herbie Mann" album given for 
the use of special divider cards 
displays shown in conjunction 
with the LP. 



Magnavox Sales 

• Continued from pajje 46 

sales training clinics per year in 
each area; supplies sales train- 
ing material to its dealers each 
month; provides point-of-pur- 
chase display material; holds 
two service clinics per year in 
each area; provides day-in-day- 
out business management help 
through its regional managers, 
and, of course, as Shallow puts 
it, "provides the finest product 
at a competitive retail price." 

The firm predicts a continual 
growth of the phonograph, ra- 
dio and television industry at a 
5 to 7 per cent rate per year. 

Shallow thinks the biggest 
rate will be in phonographs — 
because of the development of 
high fidelity and innovations in 
records, not to mention the 
growing acceptance by the 
juvenile market — followed by a 
big growth in color television. 

Shallow predicts that 1965 
will be the big impact year for 
color television, due primarily to 
the introduction of a low-cost 
color tube. 

Magnavox is planning to in- 
troduce a tape machine for the 
first time this spring. It'll be in 
mono and stereo models.The 
rest of the firm's line includes: 
Portable phonographs (all stereo 
and high fidelity) from S69.90 
to $149; transistor radios from 
$14.95 to $125; console phono- 
graphs from $149.50 to $695, 
and televisions from $149.90 for 
a 19-inch portable to $895 for 
a Stereo Theater. 



aterial 



MARCH 23, 1963 



BILLBOARD 49 



DISK DEALS FOR DEALERS 



A lummory of promotional opportunities for dtal«rt by manufacturer* and 
diitributors currently offering records at special termi. Shown where avail- 
able are starting and expiration dates for each deal as well at the date of 
issue and page number of the original news story and/or advertisement 
providing details of each promotion. Please consult these for full information. 

EPIC— Expires March 29, 1963. Started March 4, 1963. 

Special 15 per cent discount on purchases during alloted time of seven new 
releases and 37 specially selected best selling catalog albums. 

CAMEO-PARKWAY— Expires March 31, 1963. Started March 4, 1963. 

A 12'/ a per cent discount on all LP's. Delayed billing of 30-60-90 days on 
five new releases only. Also, this month only, Chubby Checker Month. A 20 
per cent discount on all Checker LP's, i.e., buy four, get one free. 

UNITED ARTISTS RECORDS— Expires March 31, 1963. Started March 4, 1963. 

"Clean Up" and "March Into Spring" program for dealers. For every 55 worth 
of merchandise purchased from catalog and 13 new releases, dealers may 
return $1 worth of product on any label. 

ABC-PARAMOUNT— Expires March 31, 1963. Started January 3, 1963. 

Label is offering 12'/ 2 per cent discount on complete catalog plus new releases. 

D1AM0 ND — Expi res March 31. 1963. Started January 25, 1963. 

One-on-seven on Johnny Thunder LP "Loop Oe Loop." 

PRESTIGE— Expires March 31, 1963. Started February 15, 1963. 

Fifteen per cent discount on all LP's by Cene Amnions, Mose Allison, Red 

Garland. Stan Cetz. Thelonious Monk. Fifteen per cent discount on complete 
Moodsville series. 

MERCURY— Expires March 31, 1963. Started February 15, 1963. 

Fifteen-on-100 on LP's by Smothers Brothers, Brook Benton, David Carroll, 
Shirley Horn. Phil Moore, the Three Sounds, plus a collection of folk music. 
See page 6, February 23 issue, for details, 

KAPP— Expires March 31, 1963. Started January 21, 1963. 

Ten per cent discount on catalog plus new releases. 

ST ARDAY— Expires March 31, 1963. Started March 1, 1963. 

"Spotlight on Bluegrass Five-String Banjo Albums." For dealers, two free 
Bluegrass albums for every 10 ordered, from 36 albums available under plan. 

J0Y-SEUCT— Expires March 31, 1963. Started February 15, 1963. 

A 1 5 per cent discount on Matys Brothers' "Who Stole the Keeshka" LP. 

ORIGINAL SOUND — Expires April 1, 1963. Started February 1, 1963. 

Label is offering one-for-five on entire LP catalog plus new release. 



EQUIPMENT NEWSLETTER 



• Continued from page 47 

henceforth all of our products will be labeled "Tested and Approved 

by FTC." 

FTC EXAMINER: You can't do that. You have no authority. . . 

CHARLIE LIVING: Don't be silly. Of course we can. FTC 
stands for Fidelity Testing Corporation, a subsidiary of the Living 
Music Phonograph Corporation. This is still free enterprise, young 
man. 

FTC EXAMINER (wearily): I wish to thank you gentlemen for 
a high level of industry statesmanship. This meeting has been 
constructive, and I'm sure we can all see now where we're headed. 
We hope to call additional meetings in the future to arrive at 
definiions of good fidelity, excellent fidelity, superior fidelity, 
superb fidelity, fine fidelity and fancy fidelity. The meeting is 
adjourned. 

• • * • 
EXCUSE PLEASE: A printer's error in our column last week 
spoiled a perfectly good breakdown of FM stereo equipment 
production for 1962. Under the heading, "FM Stereo's Progress," 
the breakdown of phonograph combinations containing FM stereo 
should have read this way: 

Radio-phono combinations: 1,380,569 produced; 605,331, or 44 
per cent, with FM stereo tuners. TV-radio combinations: 298,816 
produced; 162,208, or 55 per cent, capable of receiving FM stereo. 
(If you didn't notice the mistake, you weren't paying attention.) 




VISIT 

EW YORK 

stay at the 

PLYMOUTH 

in Radio City 

Moderate rates, private bath 
in every room, television, 
radio, dining room, coffee 
shop, garage. Within walking 
distance of all transportation 
and entertainment. Accommo- 
dations for 1000. 

TA*E A TOURI 

Includes room rent and 
sightseeing - nightclubs, 
theatres. United Nations, rfTj 0 
Radio City . . . Contact jjf, 
your Local Travel Agent J\l\ 
or write: 1 

Reservation Manager 
Jffi)' THRIFTOUP i.AN 
B& vt 'fy Fcr E< ..g Sivmq; 

1 - riff 



HOTEL 



Plymouth 

West 49th STREET bet . 
B'WAY and RADIO CITY 



America's Largest A Oldest 

OME STOP RECORD SERVICE! 



RPM 



60* 



ALL LP's— IE6UUI DISTRIBUTOR 
WHOLES* Lt NOTHING OVER 

SAME DAY SERVICE" 

The MUSICAL SALES COMPANY 

The Musical Sales Bldg. 
Baltimore 1, Maryland 



FAN MAtl GLOSSY 

PHOTOS 



All tlzei — quantities — color or black 
and white. Post cards, mounted blow- 
ups. It will pay you to ice our free 
samples and complete price Iht before 
ordering anywhere. Write today for new 
low prices, samples, etc. 



MULSON STUDIO 
Bo* 1941 Bridgeport, Conn. 



the 




FUTURE 

with a 


1 NAVY 


promise 





—EXTRA INDUSTRY SERVICE — 

This issue of Billboard is being 
distributed at the 

Intercollegiate Broadcasting System's 
Annual Convention 
in New York 

Being attended by over 200 college radio broadcasters 

Billboard The International Music-Record Newsweekly 



BEST SELLING 

PHONOGRAPHS, RADIOS & TAPE RECORDERS 

These are the nation's beit tellers by manufacturers based on results of o month- 
long study using personal interviews with a representative national cross-section 
of record-selling outlets (only) that also sell phonographs, radios and/or tape 
recorders. A different price group is published in the space each week. Each 
category appears approximately every 14 weeks. 

The percentage figure shown for each brand is its share of the total num 
of weighted points derived from all dealer responses. Point tabulations are 
bosed on the rank order of manufacturers' sales at each dealer, and weighted 
by size of outlet. Only manufacturers earning 3 per cent or more of the total 
dealer points are listed below. 

PHONOS LISTING BETWEEN $401 and $500 



•hi, 
Ittu* 

1 

2 



12/15/62 
litu* 

1 

3 



9 15 62 
Issue 

1 

3 



BRAND % OF TOTAL POINTS 

Magna vox 41.4 

Pilot 12.7 

- Zenith 12.2 

2 Fisher 6.1 

4 Curtis-Mathes 5.5 

- Packard Bell 5.5 

- General Electric 3.3 

- RCA Victor 3.3 

Other* 10.0 

Sine* this chart it based on the previous month's sales, it is conceivable that 
certain brands will appear at one time and not at another because of many 
influencing factors. Thus it does not indicate that the above ranking applies for 
any period other than the previous month. Those brands that appeared in 
previous issues for this category and do not happen to merit a listing above 
are shown below with their rank order in the issue indicated in parenthesis. 

12/15/62 Issue: Grundig Majestic (5). 
9/15/62 Issue: Grundig Majestic (5). 



4 

5 
5 
7 
7 



A special order 
for 27 classics 

"This past week we gave one 
of the Schwann Catalogs to a 
customer. Yesterday he came 
in with a special order for 
27 classics. Needless to say 
we were very much impressed 
with the possibilities..." 

The Record Center 
Daytona Beach, Florida 

Letters from record dealers all over the 
country continually tell us what a great 
help the Schwann Long Playing Record 
Catalog is to sales promotion. Small 
wonder! The average Schwann reader 
spends $143 a year on records. Whether 
you sell Schwann at the cover price of 
35c (you make at least 15> a copy) or 
distribute the catalogs free to a select 
group of "best customers" — Schwann 
Catalogs produce more record business! 

CLIP AND MAIL TODAY 



W. SCHWANN INC. 
137 Newbury Street 
Boston 16, Mass. 

Please send me 25 copies (minimum order) of your 
latest issue. 

Store 

Address 

Signature 



• 



MEN WHO READ 
BUSINESS PAPERS 
MEAN BUSINESS 



RELIABILITY — QUALITY 

RECORD PRESSING 

Originator* of the Patented 
rim drive; thick-thin 
type record 

RESEARCH CRAFT CO. 

1011 NORTH FULLER 
HOLLYWOOD 46, CALIF. 



50 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 



Ratajack May Head U. S. Cinebox 



Coin Machine 



1 



OPERATING 



MUSIC MACHINE PROGRAMMING 
RECENT STEREO RELEASES 



• DOUBLE PLAY 
BULK VENDING 



DISKS 



Bally Into Novelty Line 
With Shot to Moon 



CHICAGO— E. R. Ratajack, 
juke box industry veteran here, 
is expected to head U. S. sales 
for Cinebox, an Italian coin- 
operated movie machine oper- 
ating on the juke box principle. 

Estey Electronics, a New 
York firm, last week announced 
it had acquired the license to 
manufacture and distribute the 
machine in this country. 

Ratajack's name was not men- 
tioned, but he has been con- 
ducting extensive negotiations 
with the firm for some weeks. 
Estey's entry was thought to be 
hinged on the acquisition of a 
knowledgeable coin machine ex- 
ecutive to head its sales division. 

Ratajack's appointment would 
be a big boost toward getting 
operator distribution of the 
Cinebox in the U. S. 

The coin machine veteran was 
formerly executive vice-presi- 
dent of AMI, Inc., under John 
Haddock; later vice-president of 
Rowe-AMI Sales, and last man- 
aging director of Music Oper- 
ators of America. 

Stanley Green, Estey presi- 
dent, made the announcement 



By AARON STERNFIELD 

NEW YORK— United States 
coin machine exports for No- 
vember, some 6,262 units valued 
at $2,251,698, topped both the 
preceding month's totals (4,548 
units valued at $1,776,503) and 
the November 1961 totals (5,- 
585 units valued at $1,708,850) 
by substantial amounts. 

Most noticeable gain was in 
new juke boxes. According to 
the U. S. Department of Com- 
merce, some 1,100 new phono- 
graphs with a total value of 
$795,281, compared with 596 
new phonographs valued at 
$462,598 the preceding month 
were shipped from U. S. ports. 

While shipments of used juke 
boxes increased from 553 to 
681 in the same period, the 
value of the shipments dropped 
from $178,519 to $168,088. 

Amusement machine ship- 
ments were up from 4,548 units 
valued at $1,135,386 to 4,481 
units valued at $1,288,329. 
Confirm Trend 

The November figures con- 
firm the trend on the part of 
European coin machine buyers 
to slacken off on used U. S. 
juke boxes in favor of new Com- 
mon Market models, but to 
continue and even increase new 
machine purchases. 

West Germany, with pur- 
chases of $399,487. was the best 
U. S. customer for the month 




E. R. RATAJACK 



last week of his firm's entry into 
the field. Mentioning no names, 
Green said he had "negotiated 
the services of one of this coun- 
try's best known coin-music men 
to head the sales division of 
Cinebox. 

"We are happy to have him 
and are certain the entire indus- 



in terms of dollars, while Bel- 
gium, with purchases of 1,058 
units, bought the most equip- 
ment. 

With the exception of Bel- 
gium, which buys machines for 
transshipment, all European 
countries are buying more new 
juke boxes than used one. 

Used Machines Off 

Germany, for example, bought 
262 new machines and only 37 
second-hand units. The ratio in 
the United Kingdom is 192-33, 
while in France it is 36-4. The 
Swiss and the Italian bought 
82 and 85 new juke boxes re- 
spectively, and didn't have one 
used machine shipped in the 
country from the U. S. 

Of course many of the 322 
used phonographs shipped to 
Belgium during November by 
now have found their way to 
various other European coun- 
tries. But Europeans are still 
buying new juke boxes in prefer- 
ence to used models by a ratio 
of more than two to one. 

In Latin America, three na- 
tions not usually found among 
the top buyers' list appear on 
the export chart. 

Mexican Game Market 

Mexico, where amusement 
machines not too long ago were 
rare, bought 429 pieces at a cost 
of $43,064. Granted that the 
price averages only slightly more 
than a $100 apiece, and that 
equipment selling at that price 



try will be pleasantly surprised," 
Green said. He added an an- 
nouncement would be made 
shortly. 

Cinebox has been out some 
2'A years, primarily distributed 
in Europe and England. The 
machine resembles an American 
juke box topped by a television 
screen. Customers actually hear 
a tune and see the artist perform 
at the same time. 

The machine holds 40 selec- 
tions played from reels of 
16mm. sound film stored in cir- 
cular storage racks. Upon inser- 
tion of a coin, the proper film 
is brought from the magazine, 
automatically threaded and 
played. 

U. S. price has not been an- 
nounced. The unit sells for ap- 
proximately $3,750 in England. 

The machine is made in 
Europe by Societe Internazion- 
ale Phonovisione, Milan, Italy. 
It is one of two juke-type movie 
machines on the market. 

Scopi-Tone, a French ma- 
chine operating on an endless- 
reel principle, is its only com- 
(Continued on page 53) 



would be regarded as junk in 
most areas of the world, it docs 
indicate that a game market 
exists in Mexico. 

The same holds true with used 
juke boxes purchases. The Mexi- 
cans bought 14 units valued at 
$3,075, for an average of about 
$220 a machine. Compare this 
with West Germany's average of 
$320 a machine for 37 used 
pieces. 

But the Mexicans also bought 
30 new juke boxes valued at 
$22,350, bringing the total pur- 
chases for the month to a re- 
spectable $42,064 and eighth 
place among foreign buyers of 
U. S. coin machines. 

Argentine Purchases 

Argentina is shaping up as a 
market for U. S. games. The 
Argentinians bought no juke 
boxes — new or used — but they 
did buy 206 games at $61,817. 
And the equipment is not in- 
expensive. The average game is 
valued at slightly more than 
$300, about three times the 
Mexican average. 

Another surprise in Latin 
American is the Dominican Re- 
public. Under the Trujillo re- 
gime, the Dominicans were not 
considered much or a market 
for U. S. coin machines. Yet in 
November the Dominican Re- 
public ranked 15th among 
foreign coin machine buyers, 
with purchases of 18 new and 
(Continued on page 53) 



CHICAGO — Bally planted 
two feet firmly into the novelty 
pinball business with the intro- 
duction of Moon Shot, flipper- 
type five-ball game last week. 

Bill O'Donnell, Bally general 
sales manager, said that this is 
the "first of a continuing series 
of Bally novelty games being 
readied for the market and now 
either in advanced stages of en- 
gineering or on actual test loca- 
tions." 

Triple rocket ships on the 
backglass take off from earth 
and advance to the moon when 
four blast-off targets are hit. 
Each target hitting the moon 
scores one, two or three spe- 
cials. The rocket feature holds 
over from game to game. 

Specials are also scored by 
high score and side rollovers 
(when lit). The side rollovers 
are lighted by five rollovers at 
the top of the panel which also 
lights the "out" hole to score 
200. 

Moon Shot has a pair of sling- 
shot kickers and four pop bump- 
ers. 



By OMER ANDERSON 

HERFORD, West Germany 
— Deutsche Wurlitzer GmbH 
increased its gross sales by more 
than 100 per cent in 1962 over 
the preceding year, the firm said 
in its annual report. 

In accordance with German 
business practice, no figures 
were given. But Wurlitzer's Ger- 
man subsidiary said it was "well 
satisfied" with 1962's progress, 
which was achieved amid a gen- 
eral softening of the German 
coin machine market. 

The firm was incorporated 
under German law in 1960 with 
nominal capitalization of DM 1 
million. Capitalization was 
boosted to DM 1 .2 million at 
the beginning of 1961 and to 
DM 1.7 million in mid-1962. 
A further substantial boost in 



By ROGER MYERS 

TOPEKA, Kan. — A com- 
mittee of the Kansas Senate last 
week killed a bill that would 
require a $100 State stamp on 
pinball machines. 

That action was offset, how- 
ever, by introduction of a bill 
to outlaw bingo-type pinball 
machines as "gambling devices." 

The Assessment and Taxation 
Committee of the Senate killed 
the $100 stamp proposal. 
Double Tax 

Frank S. Hodge, committee 
chairman, said it was decided 
the tax was too high and that it 
might cut into the revenue of 
cities which have anti-pinball 
ordinances. "It would amount to 
a double tax," Hodge explained. 

The $100 stamp bill was 
aimed at five-ball machines 
played mostly by youth and had 




MOON SHOT 

Cabinet is trimmed with stain- 
less steel rails and has a steel 
door. Moon Shot may also be 
operated with or without a 
match feature. 



capitalization is understood to 
be in the offing. 

German Wurlitzer now em- 
ploys 200 at its new plant in 
Huellhorst, Westphalia, near 
Herford. 

Diversification 

Wurlitzer is taking no risks 
with phonograph production, 
however. Diversification is the 
watchword with its German op- 
eration. The Huellhorst plant is 
building the Wurlitzer organ line 
and is preparing to produce elec- 
tric cigarette vending machines. 

Deutsche Wurlitzer GmbH is 
unique among U. S. coin ma- 
chine manufacturers in Europe 
on several counts. It is the only 
U. S. manufacturer to build its 
own plant and design a phono- 
graph specifically for sale in the 
(Continued on page 52) 



no application to the bingo-type 
machines," Hodge said. "The 
committee didn't see anything 
wrong with letting kids play 
pinball machines," he said, "and 
this bill would have put them 
out of business." 

The bill to outlaw bingo-type 
machines was introduced by the 
Judiciary Committee of the Sen- 
ate and has the active support 
of Kansas Attorney General 
William Ferguson. 

Under terms of the anti- 
gambling bill, machines 
equipped with multiple coin in- 
sertion provisions, a knock-off 
button and a meter to register 
free plays cleared would be de- 
clared contraband. As such, they 
would be subject to seizure on 
sight. 

The bill would relieve Kansas 
(Continued on page 55) 



Phono Exports Lead Cain 



Coin Machine Exports 

November, 1962 





Country 


New 


Phonograph! 


Usod 


Phonogrophi 


Amusement Gomes 




Total! 




No 


Vlloc 


No. 


Vllm 


Ho. 


•Mm 


No. 


Villi! 


1. 


West Germany 


262 


$166,864 


37 


$ 12,030 


523 


$ 220,593 


822 


$ 399,487 


2. 


United Kingdom 


192 


118,834 


33 


11,079 


758 


243,818 


983 


373,731 


3. 


Belgium 


224 


176,101 


322 


73,870 


512 


119,167 


1 .058 


369,138 


4. 


France 


36 


36,096 


4 


1,430 


429 


178,337 


469 


215,863 


5. 


Canada 


73 


50,738 






569 


106,062 


642 


156,800 


6. 


Switzerland 


82 


76,927 






102 


45,813 


184 


122,740 


7. 


Italy 


85 


61,498 






75 


46.105 


160 


107,603 


8. 


Mexico 


30 


22,350 


14 


3.075 


429 


43.064 


473 


68,489 


9. 


Argentina 










206 


61,817 


206 


61,817 


10. 


Greece 






21 


3,645 


62 


46,105 


83 


49,750 


11. 


Sweden 


2 


2,262 






114 


42,950 


116 


45,212 


12. 


Denmark 


2 


3,816 






108 


36.132 


113 


39,948 


13. 


Australia 


3 


2,221 


11 


2,200 


92 


21,936 


106 


26,357 


14. 


Finland 


3 


1,632 






48 


24.1 12 


51 


25,744 


15. 


Dominican Rep. 


18 


13,424 


40 


1 1.810 






58 


25,234 


16. 


Other Countries 


85 


62.518 


199 


48.949 


454 


52.318 


738 


163.785 




Totals 


iTioo 


$795,281 


681 


$168,088 


4,481 


$1,288,329 


6,262 


$2,251,698 



Kansas Pinball Tax Killed; 
Anti-Bingo Rule Introduced 



German Wurlitzer Reports 
Gross Sales Up by 100% 



MARCH 23, 1963 



BILLBOARD 51 



See the 




BIG 3 FOR 

'fiOf BIG IN STYLE! 
UQ * BIG IN DESIGN! 
BIG IN APPEAL! 




EUROPEAN NEWS BRIEFS 



v f V - 

NEW MINNEAPOLIS HEADQUARTERS of the Sandler Distributing 
Company, Wurlitzer outlet, will be ready about June 1. The 
building will have double the space of the present facilities and 
will feature an air-conditioned showroom and a hospitality 
room where operators can eat and drink on the house. Bob 
Crosby, veteran of 17 years with Sandler, will be in charge. 

Sees Bigger Export 
Market, Fewer Firms 



CHICAGO — A growing ex- 
port market but handled by 
fewer and fewer firms was pre- 
dicted by a leading coin ma- 
chine official here. 

Joe Robbins, general sales 
manager of Empire Coin Ma- 
chine exchange, one of the na- 
tion's largest exporters of coin 
equipment, noted that foreign 
buyers were getting more and 
more sophisticated. 

'They demand better service 
and greater variety. The firms 
want to deal with one exporter 
who can handle everything. 
We've had to expand our own 
source of supply . . . it's no 
longer possible to say to a man 
that you don't handle a certain 
type of equipment," Robbins 
said. 



The Empire sales executive 
said that his firm's export vol- 
ume has increased some 25 per 
cent a year in the eight years the 
firm has participated. 

Robbins leaves on a European 
trip to explore the possibility of 
setting up exclusive representa- 
tion arrangements in each 
country. 

Robbins credited the increase 
in exporting to the success of 
the Common Market as well as 
the breaking down of trade 
barriers with other countries 
such as Spain, South America 
and the Middle East. 

Rate of Exchange 

He said that in some coun- 
tries it had been more expensive 
to buy dollars for coin machines 
than for other types of mer- 



New Phono Service 

MUNICH — A West German 
concern is offering a "phono- 
graph renewal" service consist- 
ing of the reconditioning of used 
mechanisms and the installation 
of the mechanism in a distinc- 
tive new cabinet. 

Boeck & Boeck Automaten- 
bau has developed an attractive 
console-type cabinet which it 
designates the "Star Box." This 
standard-type cabinet is universal 
for all mechanisms — U. S., 
German and French — up to and 
including 200 selections. 

Specifically, Boeck & Boeck 
is selling the Star Box with 
reconditioned mechanisms from 
Rock-Ola, Seeburg, AMI, Wur- 
litzer, Jensen, Fanfare, Sym- 
phonic Diplomat, Tonomat and 
Emaphone. 

Anti-Coin Tax Drive 

VIENNA — Austrian opera- 
tors are mounting a campaign 
to reduce taxation on phono- 

chandise. As an example, a 
South American importer might 
have to pay 40 bolivars for one 
U. S. dollar if he was importing 
coin machines. 

Robbins said much of this has 
disappeared. 

Among requisites for success- 
ful exporting, Robbins cited "a 
tremendous source of supply," 
and "being close to a seaport." 
He noted that his own firm's 
exports dropped in the winter 
when the Port of Chicago was 
closed. 

Robbins is scheduled to visit 
London. Antwerp, Paris, Rome, 
Florence and Milan. He will be 
accompanied by his wife, 
Marian. 



graphs and coin-operated games 
and to eliminate discrimination 
in tax legislation. 

Operators contend that the 
present tax of 230 shillings 
monthly is almost confiscatory 
in relation to the low level of 
phonograph collections in Aus- 
tria. On a comparative basis, 
this is a bigger bite than is taken 
from any other category of 
amusement equipment. 

Operators are protesting, 
moreover, the discrimination in- 
herent in the fact that phono- 
graphs are taxed while radio 
and television sets in restaurants 
and taverns are not. 

Dutch Dig Bowlers 

ROTTERDAM — Holland 
will soon have more bowling 
lanes, courtesy of United Manu- 
facturing Company, than wind- 
mills. In fact, Inter-Holland 
Bowling, Dutch distributor of 
United's bowlers, is well along 
toward topping the windmill 
count. United's Mini-bowling 
lanes are getting a big play from 
the bowling-happy Dutch, who 
say it is only poetic justice that 
the game should be exported 
here from the land of the Rip 
van Winkle legend. Inter-Hol- 
land Bowling is the Dutch sub- 
sidiary of Bolinga of Geneva, 
which has organized a Europe- 
wide sales program based on in- 
ternational competition among 
United teams. 

Wart Juke Box Disks 

FRANKFURT — West Ger- 
man operator associations arc 
inviting independent diskeries 
and even individual artists to 
consider the production of disks 
aimed at the juke box trade. 
(Continued on page 53) 



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Midway Deluxe Shooting 

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Williams Vanguard Guns 
Williams Crusader Guns 
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Specials 



Midway Target Gallery* 
Midway 2-Player Target 

Gallerys 
Bally All Star Bowlers 
Williams Ten Strikes 



Bowlers and Shuffles 



United Jumbos 
United Bonus 
United Playtime 



United Atlas 
United Zenith 
United Dual 



United Line-Up 

United Sunny 

United 

Big Bonus 



Williams Five Balls 



Jungle 
3 Coin 
Music Man 
Hollywood 
Serenade 
Ten Spot 
Viking 
Satellite 
Blackjack 
Cue Ball 
Steeplechase 
Clubhouse 
Kickoff 



Tic Tac Toe 
Coquette 
"21" 
Highway 
Metro 

Three Coins 
Space Ship 
Reserve 
Darts 
Kismet 
Valiant 



Gottlieb Five Balls 



Texan 

Melody Lane 
Captain Kidd 
Straight Shooter 
Mademoiselle 
Race Time 
Picnic 
Hi Diver 
World Beauty 
Whirlwind 
Kewpie Doll 
Double Action 
Brite Star 



Contest 

Egghead 

Falstaff 

Miss Annobelle 
Gondolier 
Wagon Train 
Sweet Sioux 
Roto Pool 
Atlas 

Around the World 
Seven Seas 
Sittin' Pretty 
Sunshine 
Universe 



Phonos 

Seeburg B-C-G-V-K 

Wurlitzer 2000 and up 

Rock-Ola 1448-1455-1454-1465-1468 
etc. 

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I 



52 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 



German Wurlitzer Reports Sales Up 100% 



• Continued from page 50 
European market entirely wiih- 
out reference to the U. S. home 
market. 

In contrast to Wurlitzer's 
"hard-way" approach to plant- 
ing a foot in the European Com- 
mon Market, the North Tona- 
wanda firm's U. S. competitors 
have voted for a variety of com- 
promise methods. 

Automatic Canteen hewed to 
the orthodox plan of buying a 
German manufacturers (Tono- 
mat of Neu Isenburg, near 
Frankfurt), and expanding and 
molding the Tonomat corporate 
shell to suit its conception of a 
Continental operation. 

Automatic Canteen retained 
the highly regarded Tonomat 
phonograph (the Teleramic) for 
European sale, but established 
a Continental assembly opera- 
tion at Frankfurt for its A.M.I, 
phonographs, as well as assem- 
bly and maintenance for its 
vending equipment. 

Rock-Ola Formula 

Rock-Ola has been even 
charier about pioneering on the 
European new frontier. Early in 
the Allied occupation, when 
West Germany was conserving 
its scanty horde of dollars by 
stringent currency controls and 
import quotas, Rock-Ola worked 
out a deal whereby it would ship 
mechanisms to Al Adickes' 
Nova concern in Hamburg, and 
Nova would mount the mecha- 
nisms in largely locally built 
cabinets. This formula qualified 
the Rock-Ola as "Made in Ger- 
many," and was considered by 
the trade of that period to have 
been a master stroke of business 
acumen. 

Currency controls are no 
longer a problem, but Rock-Ola 
has retained the mechanism- 
assembly formula of Continental 
operation through Nova, and 
the results have been impressive 
to date. 

Seeburg has taken an ultra- 
conservative view of Continental 
entangling alliances. Whereas 
its competitors — Wurlitzer, Au- 
tomatic Canteen and Rock-Ola 
— have all adopted to some de- 
gree a protective coloration for 
their European operations, See- 

Coinmen Show 
For Innkeepers 

CHICAGO — Several coin ma- 
chine firms are scheduled to 
exhibit at the first annual Tav- 
ern Owners Exposition, expected 
to draw some 20,000 tavern, 
night club, lounge and restau- 
rant owners from the Midwest. 

The Seeburg Corporation has 
signed to exhibit its line and 
several other firms are expected 
to sign shortly. The exposition 
will be held April 15-16-17 at 
Chicago's McCormick Place. 

The three-day program will 
include exhibits by some 75 to 
100 firms and business seminars 
on a variety of topics. 

iiiiiiitimiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

MARKETS COIN 
PLAYER PIANO 

PALISADES PARK, N. J. — 
Duffy Player Pianos here is 
marketing a coin - operated 
player piano for $595 plus the 
coin mechanism. The manufac- 
turer is advertising in local 
newspapers, with copy directed 
at tavern owners. Though the 
piano itself is a vestige of a 
bygone era, some of the avail- 
able rolls are current. 'The 
Twist" and "Roses Are Red" are 
included in the program, though 
most of the musical menu falls 
in the "old favorites" and "clas- 
sical" categories. 



burg has eschewed all compro- 
mise, modification or adaptation 
to the Continental environment. 

Seeburg's formula is curt and 
clear — sail all the way under the 
U. S. flag. Seeburg remains op- 
posed to all compromise, con- 
fident that what the Continental 
really want is the genuine U. S. 
product, and not a modification. 

The four Continental operat- 
ing philosophies are still under- 



going testing, and the final re- 
turns will not be in for several 
years yet. Wurlitzer's experiment 
has attracted perhaps the widest 
attention because, one school 
contended, it involved the most 
risks. For one thing, it is far 
more difficult and hazardous to 
build from the ground up — lit- 
erally — as Wurlitzer did at 
Huellhorst than to utilize a go- 
ing concern, either by outright 



purchase or by other arrange- 
ment. 

Wurlitzer's "split-level" ap- 
proach to the Continental mar- 
ket — offering simultaneously the 
Made-in-USA Wurlitzer and a 
German - produced "compact" 
phonograph — has been hotly de- 
bated, even within the organiza- 
tion. The feeling on the part of 
some was that production of the 
German machine, the Lyric, 



would tend to devalue the pres- 
tige appeal of the U. S. Wur- 
litzer. 

Wurlitzer never wavered in 
accepting the risks of a split- 
level policy, and the develop- 
ment has vindicated its assess- 
ment. The Huellhorst operation 
is now well established and 
geared for production for the 
European Common Market. 

Meantime, Wurlitzer Overseas 
AG, based in Zug, Switzerland, 
is promoting U. S. Wurlitzer 
sales in Europe, the Middle East 
and Africa. 



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Arthur Rosett 



MARCH 23. 1963 



BILLBOARD 53 



EUROPEAN NEWS BRIEFS 



Continued from page 51 



German operator associations 
arc arranging auditions by their 
memberships for all independent 
offerings. 

The associations propose to 
arrange for the pressing of pro- 
mising tunes at a negotiated 
price favorable to the operators. 
The scheme is an experiment to 
determine to what extent pres- 



sure can be placed thereby on 
major diskerics to reduce their 
disk prices to operators and to 
what extent acceptable phono- 
graph music is being ignored by 
the major firms. 

E. German Juke Box 

LEIPZIG — East Germany's 
only phonograph producer, VEB 



(State-owned) Funkwerk Erfurt, 
received orders for 18 of its 
prototype phonograph, the poly- 
hymat, an 80-selection box. The 
decision is still pending, how- 
ever, on whether the machine 
will be manufactured. 

It had been hoped to get 
orders for several hundred ma- 
chines, in barter if not cash 
deals. However, the phono- 
graph's proponents argue that 
once the machine is in actual 
production an delivery' guaran- 
teed, the orders will flow in. 
Production of the box has been 



help up by East Germany's 
severe economic situation. 

The box is designed primarily 
for Communist bloc countries 
and countries which trade ex- 
tensively with the Communist 
bloc, which lack foreign ex- 
change to buy U. S. or West 
German equipment. 

Bowlers in Capri 

CAPRI, Italy— On the isle of 
Capri, U. S. bowling games are 
flourishing as the latest amuse- 
ment fad. Nearly 200 bowlers 
are now placed at strategic spots 




around the island paradise in 
readiness for the holiday season. 
Mini-bowling has bowled over 
mini-golf and has even out-dis- 
tanced boccia, the Italian bowl- 
ing game, to become Capri's No. 
1 amusement. 

Capri's shrewd operators, 
wise in the ways of their fun- 
and-sun playground, are pro- 
moting competition among 
teams from yachts mooring at 
Capri. The yacht trade has im- 
parted momentum to bowler pa- 
tronage all over the island. One 
of the latest bowler enthusiasts 
is former Iranian Princess 
Soraya, who is a contender for 
Capri's distaff bowler title. 

Belgian Experiment 

BRUSSELS— A new operat- 
ing pattern for coin cinemas 
may emerge from an experiment 
being conducted in Belgium by 
a disk shop chain with Scopi- 
tone, the French-manufactured 
film phonograph. The disk shop 
organization, La Maison Blue, 
will establish an integrated 
Scopitone operation, meaning 
that it will acquire a large num- 
ber of machines, operate them, 
and produce the films for them 
through its own production com- 
pany. 

The organization thus will 
control the complete operation. 
La Maison Blue is thinking in 
terms of 200 machines. The 
Scopitone has a 200-film selec- 
tion, the largest of any currently 
produced coin cinema. The Bel- 
gian organization intends to 
produce only top-quality films 
with well-known entertainers 
and to shift machines from lo- 
cation to location as collections 
begin to slide at any one site. 

Phono Exports 

• Continued from page 50 

40 used juke boxes for a total 
value of $25,234. 

Other than the emergence of 
the three Latin American coun- 
ties as significant buyers of U. S. 
equipment, the November fig- 
ures held no surprises. 

Europeans still buy the lion's 
share of U. S. machines, with 
six of the top seven purchasers 
(Canada is the exception) in 
Western Europe. 

The November figures also 
show that amusement machine 
exports are stable, as no foreign 
country is yet able to turn out 
these devices in sufficient quan- 
tity of quality to challenge the 
American product. 

On juke boxes, of course, it's 
a different story. U. S. new ma- 
chine sales are still holding up 
and probably will continue to 
do so for the forseeable future. 
No nation can make a high-selec- 
tivity, dual-speed phonograph 
like the Americans. 

But the Europeans are creat- 
ing a market for their low-cost 
machines, and there are many 
areas of the world which can't 
afford the U. S. product. This is 
the product which will cut into 
sales of used American phono- 
graphs. 

Ratojack May Head 

• Continued from page 50 

petitor. Automatic Canteen 
Company of America has been 
testing the Scopi-Tone unit for 
some time. 

Green said that Estey would 
conduct extensive field tests of 
the Cinebox, primarily on the 
East Coast. He said he was sat- 
isfied "that the unit would meet 
with good success in the U. S. 
following our study of it in the 
European and English market." 

Green said the "public in this 
world of television and movies 
has become accustomed to see- 
ing as well as hearing the per- 
formers. Cinebox will enable the 
operator to provide this dual 
medium of entertainment to his 
customers," he added. 



54 BILLBOARD 



( MUSIC MACHINE PROGRAMMING ]' 

k , i 



MARCH 23, 1963 



DOUBLE -F>L-/*V DISKS 

Twe-iidtd action may b* m. pec ted from the following records. For the [uko box oprrotor 
limited to from 100 to 300 sides per machine, they represent maximum programming 
tfftctivenesi. Records listed below hove both sides either on the Hot 100 or have recently 
been 0* the Hot 100, Sec Spotlight Reviews for addition*! information on double-play tfiiks. 



I WANNA BE AROUND 



< 



TONY BENNETT. COLUMBIA 42434 



I WILL LIVE MY LIFE FOR YOU 



> 



< 



LET'S LIMBO SOME MORE 

CHUBBY CHECKER, PARKWAY 842 ^- 



TWENTY MILES 



LAUGHING BOY 



< 



MARY WELLS, MOTOWN 1039 



TWO WRONGS DON'T MAKE A RIGHT 



CANT GET USED TO LOSING YOU 



ANDY WILLIAMS, COLUMBIA 42674 



DAYS OF WINE AND ROSES 



THAT'S ALL 



< 



RICK NELSON, IMPERIAL 5910 



I'M IN LOVE AGAIN 



< 



ALL OVER THE WORLD 



NAT KING COLE, CAPITOL 4919 



NOTHING GOES UP (Without Coming Down) 



YOU DONT LOVE ME ANYMORE (and I Can Tell) 



< 



RICK NELSON. OECCA 31475 



I GOT A WOMAN 



THAT'S THE WAY LOVE IS 

BOBBY BLAND, DUKE 360 



CALL ON ME 



I GOT WHAT I WANTED 



BROOK BENTON, MERCURY 72099 



DEARER THAN LIFE 



STRUTTIN' WITH MARIA 



< 



HERB ALPERT & THE TIJUANA BRASS, A&M 706 



MARCHING THRU MADRID 



Recent 
REO REl 

for Music Operator* 



M SEEBURG ARTIST OF THE WEEK 

ROY HAMILTON— Soft 'n' Warm 

Epic (Pop Vocal) 

All the Woy/A Friend of Yours • Goodnight My Love/I Fall in Love Too Easily • 
If You Were the Only Girl/Homesick— That's All • Nancy/Put Your Dreams Away 
• I Couldn't Sleep a Wink Latt Night/Angel Eyes 



All titles listed rbo.r ire cvsten 33' j steree singles eecketee fer the ivke kei i 
Other packeeers or recere cetneenies may oet vretkly listings ef their product try srrtsne 
rtlsssts te Jeke le< Inistrs, •llltsesra, 1S44 Ireictwey, New Tors 34, N. Y. 



Ohio Bill Aimed 
At Phono Tax 

COLUMBUS — A bill to levy 
an annual $50-per-maehine ex- 
cise tax on juke boxes has been 
introduced in the Ohio Legisla- 
ture by Rep. John J. Horvath 
(D., Cuyahoga). 

The proposed measure would 
have the State Department of 



Education administer the fund 
for the education of retarded 
children. Licenses and stamps 
would be issued by county 
treasurer. Licenses would carry 
the name and address of the 
juke box owner and a descrip- 
tion, model number, serial num- 
ber and record capacity of the 
machine. 

Penalties for violations would 
range from $100 to $1,000. 



Shilling Goes On— But It's Real 



DENVER — It doesn't pay to give location 
owners and their employees painted money for 
shilling the juke box, or matching with customers 
for who plays the music, in the opinion of most 
phonograph operators here. 

Coins which have been dipped in paint, or 
otherwise earmarked for shilling purposes went 
out of the picture several years ago, according 
to a survey of several operators. However, shill- 
ing is still being carried out, on a simple honor 
system which apparently works out very well. 

John Knight, Skyland Music Company, simply 
issues a specific amount to bartenders and wait- 
resses at prime locations and asks the employes' 
co-operation in the matter of using the money 
to prime other coins from the location's own 
customers. 

At the Colburn Hotel bar, $1.50 in quarters 
extended to bartender Pete Fox is judiciously 



used through the entire week, usually enough 
to turn the trick, whenever there are sudden 
periods of silence. 

Fox frequently matches his customers for a 
quarter in the juke box slot, and cheerfully as- 
sents to any challenge from his customers on the 
alliance, even after the shill money has been 
used up. Knight will automatically credit him 
with it on his own statement, out of confidence 
in the bartender's long experience. 

The systems used by Sam and Dan Keys of 
Apollo Music Company, Frank Huber of Century 
Supreme Music Company, have been very much 
the same. Often, a good look at a location over 
several evenings will determine just about how 
much shill money is necessary to "keep the box 
primed" — and none of these Denver operators 
have ever had any reason to think that money 
set aside for this purpose has been put to other 



Sparks Marks Rowe AC Appointment 




JOHN HICKMAN, of Rowe 
AC, and Mrs. Avna Fisher, 
Sparks Specialty Company, 
Columbia, S. C. 



A. R. DOBSON, A. R. Dobson 
Amusement Company, Car- 
tersville, Ga., and Buddy 
Smith, of Paddy's Truck Stop, 
Adairsville, 6a. 




Some 100 operators and 
guests attended the Sparks 
Specialty Company open 
house in Atlanta last week to 
celebrate the firm's appoint- 
ment as distributor for Rowe 
AC Services. A similar open 
house is scheduled for Sparks' 
Columbia, S. C, office, March 
17. President of Sparks is 
Robert Morgan Sparks. Mrs. 
Flora Kennedy is executive 
vice-president. The firm will 
handle the full Rowe AC line 
and ofefr complete parts and 
service facilities. 



TOM SAMS, Rowe AC vice- 
president, and Sam Cohen, 
Cohen Music Company, At- 
lanta. 



GENE SMITH, manager of the 
Ramblers, and Tommy Tatun, 
J.C.D. recording artist. 





C. W. McKELVEY, manager, Rowe AC Atlanta 
office; W. E. Dorn and Ellis Royal, Rowe AC 
field service managers, and Jack Dunwoody, 
Rowe AC vice-president. 



TOM SAMS, Rowe AC; Billy DeSelm, United; 
Mrs. Flora Kennerly, Sparks Specialty, and 
George Klersey, Rowe AC. 




Among 100 guests at Sparks open house were 
Mrs. R. M. Anderson, Mrs. Wendell Lindsey, 
Mickey Rolfe, Mrs. Flora S. Kennerly, Mrs. Jack 
T. Harris, Mrs. Mary Hackler, Mrs. Avna Fisher, 
Mrs. Mary Rugh Simpson, Mrs. Mary Peddy, 
Mrs. Rosebud Hawkins, Mrs. Johnny Shealey, 



STAFF OF COHEN MUSIC COMPANY, Atlanta, 
on hand for Sparks open house were Mary 
McDuffie, Sam Cohen, Mrs. Bill Wooten, Jerry 
Rutherford and Frank Hardy. 



Mrs. Corrine Curran, Mrs. T. C. Cartright, Suella 
Harris, Gloria Stevens and Mrs. Bill Wooten. 



MARCH 23, 1963 



BILLBOARD 55 



Too Many Cooks Spoil the Diet 



DENVER — It doesn't pay to 
have too many people helping 
to make up the music menu in 
programming, in the opinion of 
Lee Wyscaver, head of the 
long - established Lee Music 
Company, here. 

Wyscaver's programming, over 
a huge area which includes all 
of Denver and most of its sub- 
urbs, is handled by two collec- 
tors, both of whom have been 
on the same route for many 
years, and who handle the 
whole ball of wax — including 
making up the music menu it- 
self, typing up labels in their 



ROSEN 

SPECIALS 

FROM THE 

WORLD'S 
LARGEST 
INVENTORY 

Complete and Ready 
To Co At The Best 
Prices Ever Offered 



CUNS — RIFLES 

Eick 

4 State Ftlr cmce $125.04 

4 Ml Tip tmo 175.00 

3 Cm Fir. Wm. 150.00 

BOUNCING BALL 
RIFLES 

Each 

2 Wm. Vngiurd $275.00 

2 Wins. tafoJN 275.00 

1 Was. Onto 250JO 

2 Wm. Tltin 2*5.00 

18 Midway Shooting Gallery 
Regular (The pistol that 
shoots plastic pellets at 
moving targets) 245.00 

5 MU UCEM. Wits... 505.00 

All PrfC«f Quoted Crated 
F.O.B. Phlle. 

WIRE — PHONE- WRITE TODAY 

Send lor Complete Lists From 
World's Largest Inventory 

ARCADE— GAMES— IINGOS 
RIDES — MUSIC— etc. 



DAVID ROSEN 

FirliisiK A M I Disl I, Pa. 
8S5 N. BROAD SIKEI. PHIIA. 23. PA. 
.PRONE: (Mill! 2 2903 



when answering ads . 

Say You Saw It in 
Billboard 



homes each day for the next 
day's record changes. 

"We have experimented with 
all of the systems in use, includ- 
ing central-office programming," 
Wyscaver said. "In every case 
wc have found that the man 
who is out on the route, in regu- 
lar contact with the people who 
are playing the records, can do 
the best job." 

No Buttonholing 

Wyscaver emphatically warns 
against buttonholing of location 
employees, and demanding that 
they suggest records which they 
think should be on the spindles. 

"If a location owner, merely 
attempting to please out of 
friendship, makes a stab at rec- 
ommending records which he 
thinks would go, without giving 
it sufficient thought, the play- 
meter is bound to suffer," Wys- 
caver said. "Then, there may be 
disagreement between employ- 
ees in the same location as to 
whether the suggested number 
will have the appeal considered. 
Dissension like this is never 
good, and it certainly doesn't 
lead to better collections." 

Weighted Basis 

Changing from 6 to 10 rec- 
ords every two weeks, Lee Mu- 
sic Company, of course, listens 
to opinions, but considers them 
on a thoroughly weighted basis. 

"The playmeter is the final 
judge, and the play of any new 
record in one location has a lot 
to do with what the collector 
sets up for the next one," Wys- 
caver added. 

One major change which the 
Arvada firm has made in the 
past two years has been to ear- 
mark around one-third of the 
music menu for all-time favor- 
ites, which proved to be a 
highly profitable step, and kept 
Lee Music Company collections 
near those of the previous year 
in 1962. 

All-time favorites are by good, 
reliable artists, such as Nat King 
Cole, Frank Sinatra, Tony Ben- 
nett and Margaret Whiting. 

The exact percentage of each 
type of music on the spindle is 
difficult to pin down, simply be- 
cause no two stops show the 



ARCADES 



Full line of 

PARTS & 
SUPPLIES 

Write for latest catalog 
of co/ it-operated oquipmwnt 

Mike Munves Corp. 

577 10th Avenue 
New York 36, N. Y. 
BRyant 9-6677 




electric 
scoreboard 



FOR SHUFFLE BOARDS 

Natural Finish Hardwood Cabinet 

10c 1 player or 10c 2 
player by simpU pUig 
switchover 



Two-faced 

FHi any thutfleboard 
Scores 15-21 and/or 
50 points 

Large metal ABT coin 
rejector box 
Coin-operated 



Aluminum button scor 
inq blocks 

Chrome tube supports 



$ 159 



50 



IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

Terms: 1/3 dep., Bal. COO or S.D. 

MARVEL MANUFACTURING CO. 

2645 W. Fullerton Ave., Chicago 47. III. 
Phone: Dl 2-2424 



same variation in pops, rock and 
roll, twist and r.&b. music. 

Wyscaver does all of the new- 
location selling himself, and 
considers it his duty as a good 
businessman, to call on every lo- 
cation three or four times a year 
merely "to keep them sold." 
Good, down-to-the-minute pro- 
gramming is one asset which he 
always pitches to both new and 
established location owners, 
with the playmeters backing him 
up thoroughly. 



Kansas Tax Killed 

• Continued from page 50 

agents of the burden of obtain- 
ing evidence of payoffs on the 
machines. 

The bill provides that owner- 
ship or possession of pinball 
machines with the three equip- 
ment items is unlawful. Viola- 
tion would be a misdemeanor 
punishable by a fine up to 
$1,000, a six-month county jail 
sentence or both. 

A federal coin-operated de- 
vice revenue stamp on the ma- 
chine would be probable cause 
for a search warrant to be issued 
against the machine under terms 
of the bill. 

The bill came in late in the 
1963 Kansas Legislative session. 
Less than a month remains and 
this might have a telling affect 
on the measure. The mortality 
rate of bills is highest during 
the home stretch. Conversely, 
opponents of the bill will not 
have as much time to organize. 



FOR SALE 

Wurlltur ITO© ci 75.00 

Wurllrxor lOOO 250 00 

Wuriihrr 210)4 375*0 

Wurlitzer 25S or 257 Stepper. 

■a 35.00 

Wurlitzer 104 Selection Boxes 50.00 
Wurlltier 100 Selection Boxes 75.00 

Rock-Ola 1455D 300.00 

Sand Vi deposit to 
CUERRINI'S 
131 1 W. 4th St. Lewlstown, Pa. 

OPERATE 

UNITED 

Shuffle Alleys 

and 

Bowling Alleys 

WELCOME EVERYWHERE 
★ 

UNITED MANUFACTURING CO. 

3401 N. California Avt. 
CMcafo 18. III. 



I 



"AIL STAR" BASEBALL • ROYAL CROWN BOWLER 
CITATION PUCK BOWLER 



I 



CHICAGO DYNAMIC INDUSTRIfS. INC 1775 W. DtVIRSEY CHICAGO 14 



Our Spring House Cleaning 
Can Mean Savings to You 
On This Fully Reconditioned Equipment 



PHONOGRAPHS 



Seeburg 



AMI 



AY 160 SH $895.00 E-80 $ 99.50 



AQ 160 SH 795.00 

222 SH 625.00 

L-100 425.00 

HK200 (Hideaway) . . 225.00 



Rock-Ola 

1455 $225.00 

Wurlitzer 



M100C 225.00 2500 $595.00 

WALLBOXES 
Seeburg 

D-3WA (200 Sel.) $59.50 -3W1 (100 Sel.) $34.50 

Chrome New Buttons Fully Reconditioned 

Wurlitzer 

5210 (5-10-25) 200 Sel $49.50 

5250 (50c) 200 Sel 59.50 

5207 104 Sel 29.50 

Rock-Ola 

1548 (120 Sel.) $24.50 



AMI 



W-12 (120 Sel.) 

W-80 (80 Sel.) 

Cigarette 

National 9-column . .$ 
Eastern Mark II . . 
Eastern 10-column 
Rowe 1 1 -column 
"Commander'' 
Seeburg 800E-1 . 
Corsair 20-column 



and Other Vendors 



.$24.50 
. 24.50 



69.50 I Corsair 30-column 
129.50 
49.50 

79.50 
169.50 
159.50 



$184.50 

Stoner 1 1 -column .... 89.50 

Rowe 11 -column 99.50 

DuGrenier 14-column . 99.50 
Fawn 16-column .... 79.50 
Keeney Pop-Corn 

Machines 199.50 



V> Deposit— Balance Sight Draft 

SHAFFER MUSIC COMPANY 

Distributors of Seeburg Vending Equipment 
and Background Music Systems 
849 N. High St Phone: 294-4614 Columbus, Ohio 



GIVE TO DAMON RUNYON CANCER FUND 




You're in business to make money. 
Billboard is in business to help you. 

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area of your fast-paced industry . . . profit ideas 
—current trends and forecasts— legislation affect- 
ing your operation— new machines— new products 
—new services— new money-making ideas. 

Get tomorrow's news today. Oof If fast. 
Get ft often. Get Billboard. 



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Please enter my subscription to BILLBOARD for 

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Other overseas rates on request. 



S60 



Company^ 



City_ 



Type of Business 



Copyrkj 



56 BILLBOARD 








MARfH 99 10A? 
MMK^n XJ, 1 70d 




BULK VENDING 

- 


1 



ready to serve every 
operator from 

Coast to Coast 

at Low Factory Prices 

LET THE BIG TEN 

SERVE YOUR NEEDS 

The most complete bulk vending 
facilities available to satisfy all 
your vending needs. 

ALL WAREHOUSES CARRY 
A COMPLETE STOCK OF 
CHARMS, RINGS, CAP- 
SULES, VENDING MA- 
CHINES, GUM, NUTS, 
CANDY, VENDING PARTS. 



BALTIMORE 

CALVIN SALES CO., INC. 

025 West North' An. 
Baltimore, Maryland 

30) 669049° 



BOSTON 

NORTHWESTERN 
SALES & SERVICE 

1194 Tremont Street 
Boiton, Mali. 

615 HI 5-8935 



CHICAGO 

KING & COMPANY 

2700 Weil Lake Street 

Chicago, Illinois 

312 KE 3-3302 



CLEVELAND 

RIDGE GUM CORP. 

4328 Ridge Rood 
Cleveland, Ohio 



LOS ANGELES 

OPERATORS VENDING 
MACHINE SUPPLY CO. 

1023 South Grand Avenue 
Loi Angelttt, Calif. 

213— Rl B-0131 



NEW ORLEANS 
. SCHIRO 

VENDING SUPPLY 

122 No. Carrollton Avenue 
New Orleans, La. 

504 482-102.4 



NEW YORK CITY 

NORTHWESTERN 
SALES & SERVICE 

446 Weit 36th Street 
Now York, N, Y. 
212 10 4-4467 



OAKLAND 

STANDARD VENDING 
MACHINE SUPPLY CO. 

5215 East 12th Street ' 
Oakland 1, Calif. 
415 261-9037 



PHILADELPHIA 

RAKE COIN MACHINE 
EXCHANGE 

609 Spring Garden Street 
Philadelphia, Penna. 
215 WA 5-2676 



ST LOUIS 

SAMUEL J. PHILLIPS CO. 

2950 Washington Blvd. 
St. Louis, Missouri 
314 OL 2-6015 



CONTACT YOUR 
NEAREST BIG TEN 
WAREHOUSE TODAY 



New Bulk Line to Make Chi Bow 

( 



VAN NUYS, Calif.— First of 
a new line of bulk merchandise 
venders will be unveiled in Chi- 
cago during the National Ven- 
dors Association convention, ac- 
cording to Harold Probasco, de- 
signer of the Acorn line and a 
former vice-president and pro- 
duction manager of Oak Manu- 
facturing Company and its man- 
ufacturing subsidiaries for 13 
years. 

The new line will be sold 
under the name of King Koin 
and will be made by Harby In- 
dustries. Probasco is the sole 
owner of the company, which, 
he said, had established adequate 
factory space in this area. 

The bulk merchandise vender 
to be shown will vend a general 
line, Probasco explained. The 
machine is 6'/z by 6V4 by 16 
inches tall. It is of red porcelain 
on steel body. The mechanism is 
chrome with base trim for hop- 
per and top. The globe will hold 



MANDELL GUARANTEED 
USED MACHINES 



N.W. Model 49, 1* or 5c SM 50 

N.W. Deluxe, 1< or 5c Comb. .. 12.00 
N.W. 10 Col. M Teb Gum Mach. 19,00 
N.W. Model S33, U Pore. Con- 
verted for 100 ct. 8.0 A.50 

ART Guns N.00 

Mills W Teb Gum n.co 

Acorn 8 lb. Glob* 10 50 



MERCHANDISE S SUPPtlES 



Pistachio Nuts, Jumbo Queen, 

■.tO t .77 

Pistachio Nuts, Jumbo Queen, 

White * . .70 

Pistachio Nuts, Large Tulip JS 

Pistachio Nuts, Vendor's Mix .. .68 

Pistachio Nuts, Sheik, Red ,58 

Cashew, Whole .6-4 

Cashew, Butts it 

Peanuts, Jumbo AS 

Spanish 35 

Mixed Nuts .57 

Baby Chicks M 

Rainbow Peanuts .3: 

Bridge Mix M 

Boston Baked Beans ,32 

Jelly Beans .30 

Licorice Gems M 

M & M, 500 ct .47 

Hershey-ets ,47 

Rain-Bio Gum, 71 et $ .32 

Malt-ette, 100 ct., per 100 .35 

Rain Bio Ball Gum, 140 ct., 

170 ct., IT0 rt £2 

Rain-Bio Bell Gum, 100 ct .34 

300 lb. minimum prepeid on all 
Raln-Blo Ball Gum. 
Adams Gum, all flavors, 100 ct. as 
Wrigley's Cum, all flavors, 100 Ct. .43 

Beech-Nut, 100 ct A9 

Hershey's Chocolate, 300 ct. ... 1J0 
Minimum order, 25 Boxes, assorted. 



Complete line of Parts, Supplies, 
Stands, Globes, Brackets, Charms. 
Everything for the operator. 
One-third Deposit, Balance C O D. 



IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

VICTOR 
VENDORAMA 




ALL 
PURPOSE 
VENDOR 

1c, 5c, 10c or 
25c Mechanisms 

AM parts in- 
terchangeable 
in seconds. 

Vends bulk candy, 
peanuts, tall gum, 
charms and cap- 
sules. Many new 
time • saving fea- 
tures, including re- 
movable cash boi 
and ne top lock. 



Unique in beauty and design. 



STAMP FOLDERS, Lowes! Prices. Writs 



MB 144th Place. Jamatce 35. N.V. 



" MACHINE DISTRIBUTORS, Inc. 



NORTHWESTERN 

SA15S AND SERVICE CO 

MOE MANDELl 
4J6- W ]6lh Si . Ne, Toil IS. N ~ 
tO«oo,,e 4 4467 



when answering ads . 
Say You Saw It 
In Billboard 




HAROLD PROBASCO 

nine pounds of 210 ball gum. 
Coin chutes are interchangeable. 

Probasco, who has been in 
bulk vending designing for 25 



Western Vending 
Operators to Mull 
Code, Licensing 

LOS ANGELES — Reports on 
the drafting a code of ethics, 
fight against unfair licenses, and 
ways and means of financially 
supporting the various activities 
will be heard at the regular 
monthly dinner meeting of the 
Western Vending Machine Op- 
erators Association Tuesday (26) 
evening. 

The meeting will be held at 
the Nikabob Restaurant, West- 
ern at 9th. Dinner will be served 
at 7 with the meeting scheduled 
to start at 8. 

Eugene Zola, WVMOA attor- 
ney, will report on his campaign 
against licenses in the various 
municipalities. Bud Harris, Ken 
and George Ferrier will present 
their findings on financial cam- 
paigns for discussion. 



Selma Katz Weds 

NEW YORK — Selma Katz, 
daughter of Charlie Katz, coin 
machine manufacturers' repre- 
sentative, was married to Har- 
vey Netzer Sunday (17) in the 
Temple of the Covencnt here. 
The couple is on a Puerto Rico 
honeymoon. 



SUPER 60 

• NO BREAKING 

• NO CRUSHINC 

• NO MISSING 



#1 




Try one . . . Learn why other 
operators find the SUPER 60 their 
favorite capsule vender. 
Getting the Northwesterner? It's a 
newsy magazine. Ask to get on 
our mailing list. It's freel 

WIRE, WRITE OR PHONE. 



CORPORATION 

2334 E. Armstrong St.. Morris, III. 
Phone: WHrrney 2-1300 



of his 47 years, said the features 
of the machine are: improved 
coin mechanism with magnetic 
stop to refuse steel slug, new 
watch dog arrangement reject- 
ing coins of improper size, slip 
handle as standard equipment, 
a patent-applied double ratchet 
to protect against spring failure, 
and waterproofing even to the 
top lock. The hopper and globe 
are designed to prevent bridging 
of merchandise. 

The machine also features a 
shatterproof plastic globe as 
standard equipment and extras 
will be priced competitively with 
glass, Probasco said. He added 
that the service heads are easily 
removed and installed. Coin con- 
trol can be easily removed or 
interchanged. The coin guide is 
precision engineered. Also new. 



the designer added, is a new 
spring clip for brush springs. 

The machines are precision 
die cast and a unit weighs ap- 
proximately eight pounds. 

King Koin line will be com- 
petitively priced and sold 
through distributors who will be 
appointed soon, Probasco said. 



Karl Guggenheim 
Hosts Distribs 

CHICAGO— Warehouse dis- 
tributors of Karl Guggenheim, 
Inc., New York, charm manu- 
facturer, and their wives, will 
be guests of the company at the 
Sheraton-Chicago Hotel here 
Thursday (28). 

Bob Guggenheim and Fred 
Loewes will host the dinner 
party which gets under way at 
6:30 p.m. The distributors will 
be in Chicago for the annual 
convention of the National 
Vendors Association. 



Great Time Saver 

COIN 
WEIGHING 

SCALE 



1c or lc & 5c 
Combination 



Weighs $10.00 in 
pennies, $30.00 in 
nickels. Sprim 
are precision cal 
brdted. Heavy 
metal base. Glass- 
covered dial pro- 
teefs pointer when 
in use. 



$ 22 



.00 




Complete With Sturdy 
Carrying Case 
ORDER TODAY 



MEMBER NATIONAL VENDING 

MACHINE DIST.HiriMS, Ik. 



J. KHOENBACH 



F.Kttwy D.Mi.bulfii of |t<ilh ,,nr| v ,|| r,»in 
Wnrtnf ., Mt"tlwiwli'.e. Cdfl",. .i.,u 

Stamp v< ■ ■ ■ . Ini.l.c. tie) hi lie emit 
t,«*kvf Md-h.n.'. imtUty tiwkm t *™t 

S..r..ldfy M..il.,n«t, r. i . i .-■,;>. ', . I»f 



71S Lincoln Place, BROOKLYN 16. N. Y. 
PResidenl 2-2900 




VENDING HEADQUARTERS 
«■ VICTOR 

THE MOST COMPLETE and FINEST LINE 
ol BULK VENDORS 

New Victor 2000 Vendor, Largs Capacity . . . 
Holds 2,000 Balls 100 Count Cum ... or 600 10c 
Capsules . . . Also Available 3 Bills lOOCounf 
6am lor Sc. $24.50 ti. 

Large Slock el Vender*— Pan, and Merchandlie. 

Write ter Prlcea. 

H. B. HUTCHINSON, JR. 

1714 N. Decatur ltd., N [. Atlant. T. Ca. 



Phone: DRake 7-4300 




HEADQUARTERS 

Whatever your bulk vending requirements might 
be, we can serve you. 

Always a complete stock of outstanding North- 
western machines, parts and supplies. 

Write today for complete information and price list. 

BIRMINGHAM VENDING CO. 

S20 Second Avenue, North Birmingham, Alabama 

Phone: FAIrfax 4-7526 



Entirely new, especially designed items 
comprise half of our Now Jumbo Charm 
Assortment. The other half is Deluxe 
Rings which vend perfectly because of 
an insert containing an extra prise. 



ROCKET OR 
JUMBO 5* 

ALL CHARM VENDING 

THIS IS ALL NEW. 
BE THE FIRST IN YOUR TERRITORY. BIG PROFITS. 

Atlas has the perfect machine for Jumbo Charms. 
Write for information on how to convert other 
Vendors. 



FREE Illustrated 
Sheets on ell 
Feature Charms, 
Rinos and Bulk 
Charms. 




• 

• • 

The 

PENNY KING 

Company 

2534 Million St., Pittiburgh 3, Po. 
World", lorgejr Selection ol Miniature) Charm 




St 

SILAS HASTES 

Jumbo Charm 
Vendor 



Copyrigl 



MARCH 23, 1963 



BILLBOARD 57 



Prizes in Store for NVAers 



CHICAGO — Operators will be 
in for such luxury prizes as a 
new compact car, a color tele- 
vision set and a freezer-refrig- 
erator as National Vendors As- 



Attention Mr. Operator 



Coming Soon 



Victor's New 25^ & 50^ 



Capsule Vendor. Vending 



The Large V2 Capsule. 



Reg. U.S. Patent Office. 



Write For Advance 



Information Now! 



VICTOR VENDING CORP. 



5711 West Grand Avenue 
Chicago 39, Illinois 



sociation holds its annual con- 
vention in Chicago's Sheraton 
March 28-30. 

The television set, freezer, 
plus many other prizes will be 
raffled off during the new NVA 
"Mystery Event" to be held at 
the association's wind-up ban- 
quet and floorshow, Saturday 
(30) evening. 

Paul Price, New York charm 
manufacturer, will raffle off the 
new compact car, Saturday aft- 
ernoon from the convention ex- 
hibit floor. 

Social Program 

Other luncheons, breakfasts, 
and a special ladies social pro- 
gram under the direction of Sue 
Folz, will be held during the 
three-day conclave. 

Leaf Brands will start activi- 
ties off with a Wednesday (27) 
"pre-convention" breakfast for 
the firm's distributors and wives. 

Wednesday noon, Samuel Epp 
and Company will host a lunch- 
eon for its distributors. 

The convention committees 
will meet Wednesday afternoon. 
Heads of these include: Rolfe 
Lobell, convention; Dick Gibbs, 
exhibits; Harold Folz, program; 
Bob Guggenheim, publicity; Leo 
Leary, membership; Jack Nelson, 
reservation, and Loretta Cook, 
registration. 

NVA's board of directors 
meeting will be held Wednes- 
day evening. 

Exhibit Hours 

Thursday (28). exhibits will 
be open from 10 to 6. The 
National Vending Machine Dis- 
tributors Association will hold 



IMPORTANT MEMO 

AD DEADLINE FOR 
N.Y.A. CONVENTION ISSUE 

Dated: March 30 

Distributed: Monday, March 25 
(Ad Deadline: March 20) 

FREE distribution of this issue at the N.V.A. Con- 
vention, Sheraton-Chicago Hotel, Chicago, Illinois, 
March 28-31. 

REACH OPERATORS IN THIS EDI- 
TORIAL PACKED ISSUE, which will 
contain a comprehensive report of 
convention activities. 

ONLY IN BILLBOARD IS WEEKLY 
BULK VENDING NEWS REPORTED. 

ONLY in Billboard can advertisers reach (at low 
cost) the operators in attendance as well as those 
operators unable to attend the convention. 

Send Advertising Copy on or Before 
Wednesday, March 20. 



Billboard 



188 West Randolph 
Chicago 1, Illinois 
Phone: CEntral 6-9818 



1564 Broadway 
New York 36, H.Y. 
Plaza 7-2800 



a luncheon meeting at noon. 

Friday, exhibits will be open 
from 10 to 12 and from 3:30 
to 6. NVA will sponsor a lunch- 
con meeting at 12:30 and the 
association will hold an evening 
cocktail party from 8:30 to 
11:30. 

Saturday, exhibits will also be 
open from 10-12 and 3:30 to 
6, with NVA sponsoring another 
luncheon and winding up fes- 
tivities with its traditional ban- 
quet and floorshow in the 
evening. 

A special $25 per couple 
price covers admission and all 
social events sponsored by the 
association. Convention chair- 
man Lobell noted that with the 
two luncheons, evening cocktail 
party and wind-up banquet and 
floorshow, operators would re- 
ceive at least twice their ad- 
mission value in entertainment 
alone. 



Philly School 
Starts Classes 
In Vend Repair 

PHILADELPHIA— The Bok 
Vocational Training School here 
has begun a six-month vending 
repair school, according to Alan 
Morrison, president of the Penn- 
sylvania Automatic Merchandis- 
ing Council. 

The 780-hour training course 
is the second of its kind in the 
nation and is authorized by the 
Federal Manpower Develop- 
ment Training Act of 1962. 

The first vending machine re- 
pair school opened February 1 
at the Los Angeles Trade-Tech- 
nical College. The National Au- 
tomatic Merchandising Associa- 
tion assisted in the organization 
of both schools. 

While the curriculum was 
based on that of the Los Angeles 
school, it was tailored to local 
needs by a PAMC advisory com- 
mittee headed by Albert M. 
Rodstein, president of Macke 
Variety Vending, Philadelphia. 

Some 24 students are attend- 
ing for five days a week and six 
hours a day. All are unemployed 
skilled workers from other in- 
dustries. 



Break-In Ware 
Hits Memphis 

MEMPHIS — Coin machine 
thieves, believed to be a group 
of juveniles, struck again last 
week in a series of break-ins of 
phonographs, pin games and 
cigaret vending machines, Police 
Chief James C. Macdonald re- 
ported. 

Macdonald has a special 
squad of detectives trying to 
catch the gang, which coin op- 
erators estimate account for nu- 
merous burglaries each week. 

With this gang, and other 
coin machine break-ins, losses to 
operators run into the thousands 
of dollars each week. 

"Wc think the thieves arc 
juveniles living in this section," 
said Inspector W. E. Routt. He 
ordered more frequent checks 
of locations, recalling that five 
other spots were hit recently. 



Allen Smith in Crash 

MEMPHIS— Allen C. Smith, 
head of the vending division of 
Sammons-Pennington Company, 
distributor, crashed his car into 
an underpass center post last 
week but escaped serious injury. 



UJA Coinmen Meet 

NEW YORK — Executive 
committee members of the 
United Jewish Appeal's Coin 
Machine Division will meet at 6 
p.m., Wednesday (20), at UJA 
headquarters here to discuss the 



1963 campaign. Irving Holz- 
man, acting chairman, said the 
1963 guest of honor will be 
announced at the meeting. 



BUY THE BEST I 

Going Strong 
Your machine* ompty fait 
with th««« beautiful detailed 




WATER SNAKES, In asiorted 
colon. 

ONLY $46.00 par M Copsuled 
Label* available.. 

PAUL A. 

PRICE co., inc. 

5S Leonard St., New York 11, N. Y. 
CCrtland 7-5147-8 

****%*^*W^r*ft|AfN-**'t^**l*' 



Ml tie World 
confers savis . r*ADf s.. swaps 

FOREIGN 
POSTAGE STAMPS 

THouueoi or tmn . . *u M— I nun. nam 

ALL OVER THE 10*10 . . EMUMML, i (UtOUMHO 

■Y »n>t»r. .niurjir fv (IDS. 10* M CJHI 

lUa Q) . rr " h . . ■ - OH - : < ESVO* 

NOW THiY CAH Bt 5010 
IN YOU* CAPSUlt MACHINE 



WORLD STAMPS 

..mid c.nuui 
»20°° e- <• 



^ SUMPS o, tni WORLD 

138°o „. , 



F.O.B. our Factory or from 
Eppy Warehouse 



CWARM3 lisle, 
01 wis 144th Piece, Jemiici as, N.Y 




LOOK! All These Features . . . 

1. Engineered for coins of any country, up to size of large English 
penny or U. S. 50c. 

2. YEARS AHEAD STYLING-Demanded by Chain Stores. 

3. Compact, practical— Smallest floor space with greatest earnings. 
Mark 1's fasten neatly together, forming a battery of any site. 

4. THE FINEST MATERIALS— Without comparison for time, weather, 
and usage resistance. 

5. BUILT FOR BUSINESS Comer locks eliminating water seepage, 
corner protection pipes, out-of-view wheels, and innumerable other 
exclusive features are reasons why Beaver is the world's largest 
selling bulk vendor. 

6. SIMPLE— Ready-filled jars with labels or displays speed up servicing. 
Chain Store managers who fill their own machines will find it 
easy— even if they know nothing about vendors. 

7. SANITARY — Jars come filled, labeled, and clinic clean. 

8. SWIFT— Ready-filled quick-change jars cut service time way down 
and practically eliminate shop work with no more filling, applying 
deeds, washing globes, etc. 

9. The empty jars themselves will be in great demand by store- 
keepers, his friends, and his customers for cookie jar or display jars. 

Truly . . . the Disposable Jar 
used in conjunct/on with the 
BEAVER MARK I opens up 

"A New Frontier in Bulk Vending" 



Distributorships Available Throughout the World 
Address All Inquiries To: 

BEAVER INTERNATIONAL 



1415 LAWRENCE AVE. W. 



TORONTO 15, ONTARIO 



I am interested in getting full details on Beaver bulk 
distributorship now available. 



Company. 



City and Stafe_ 



58 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 



W. Va. Bill KO's Per-Mach. Fee 



CHARLESTON, W. Va. — 
The West Virginia Legislature 
has passed a bill which virtually 
eliminates per-machine licenses 
in favor of a graduated sched- 
ule. 

Operators of penny machines 
pay from $2.50 to $600 (for 
more than 300 machines); op- 
erators of nickel or higher ma- 
chines pay from $5.50 to $1,800 
(for more than 450 machines). 

John A. (Red) Wallace, board 
chairman of the West Virginia 
Music and Vending Association, 
said the new legislation would 
save operators several thousand 
dollars annually. 

Other Bills Killed 

Wallace noted that several 
other bills which would have 
adversly affected the coin ma- 
chine industry had been killed 
in committee. 

Wallace termed the gradu- 
ated schedule a good step for- 
ward for the State. 

Up to now, operators paid 



Mystifying^. . . 

Magic-MaSSTtS/v 



$2.50 per machine per year for 
penny machines and $15.50 per 
machine per year for machines 
operating at 5 cents or more. 

The new schedule is as fol- 
lows: 

On penny machines, operators 
pay $2.50 per machine for one 
to nine units; $25 flat fee for 
9 to 50 machines; $75 for 51 
to 150 machines; $200 for 151 
to 300 machines, and $600 for 
300 or more machines. 
Other Fees 

On nickel or higher machines, 
operators pay $5.50 per unit for 
one to nine machines, and flat 



fees of $175 for 10 to 49 ma- 
chines; $450 for 50 to 100 ma- 
chines; $800 for 101 to 200 
machines; $1,200 for 201 to 300 
machines; $1,500 for 301 to 450 
machines and $1,800 for 450 or 
more machines. 

The latter fee schedule ap- 
plies for all types of coin oper- 
ated equipment functioning at 
5 cents or more. It includes 
vending, games, rides and music. 

The fee schedule, said Wal- 
lace, was worked out jointly be- 
tween the West Virginia associa- 
tion and the State Tax Commis- 
sion. 



State Sales Appointed by 
Wurlitzer for Baltimore 




per thousand 

AT YOUR NEAREST WAREHOUSE 
OR DIRECT FROM 

AKL GUGGENHEIM,: 




NEW BALTIMORE DISTRIBUTORS FOR WURLITZER are 
Dave Koenigsberg, standing, and Sam Weisman. 



BALTIMORE — The State 
Sales & Service Corporation, or- 
ganized three years ago by 
Sam Weisman and Dave Koen- 
igsberg, has been named local 
Wurlitzer distributor. 

State Sales will service Mary- 




VENDING HEADQUARTERS 
" VICTOR 

THE MOST COMPLETE and FINEST LINE 
of BULK VENDORS 
Ntw Vklor 2000 Vendor, Large Capiclty . . . 
Holds 2,000 Ball: 100-Coirnl Gum ... or 600 10c 
(•wilts ... Also Available 3 tils 100-Counl 
Gum tor 5c. $24.50 oa. 

Urft Stock or Vendor, — Part, ind Mtrchandiic. 
Writs for PricM. 

PARKWAY MACHINE CORP. 

715 truer Sr. laKImm 2. Ma. 



land, the District of Columbia 
and parts of Virginia and Penn- 
sylvania. 

Weisman, a veteran of more 
than 30 years in the coin ma- 
chine industry, was a top ex- 
ecutive of the United distribu- 
torship before he formed State 
Sales with Koenigsberg. 

Koenigsberg, with 20 years in 
the industry, had specialized in 
the operating and electronics end 
of the business. 

State Sales displayed the 
Wurlitzer line to local opera- 
tors at an open house here 
Wednesday and Thursday (13 
and 14.) On hand were A. D. 
Palmer Jr., Wurlitzer advertising 
and sales promotion manager, 
and Hank Peteet, Wurlitzer 
Eastern field service engineer. 

Within the next two months, 
Weisman and Koenigsberg plan 
to visit every customer in their 
territory. 



60 MODERN! SAVE TIME! SAVE MONEY! 

DISPLAY PROPERLY FOR ACTION! 




PERFECT, FAST FRONTING 
WITH THESE SKIN - PACKED 
AND PRINTEH? DISPLAY CARDS 



A capsule that to 
sure- lockin g diff- 
6rent,new...££Srf 
Colorfully tinted 
in transparent hues 
d Blue.Red.Gwn 
and Amber piostic. 



RINGSWNGSRINGSi 





BULK VENDING SALE 

All machinei clean and rtady for 

location). 

N.W. MODEL 60. like new. $11.50 

N.W. MODEL 49 12J0 

N.W. TAB GUM 14.95 

N.W. MODtt 33 BALL GUM 

& PEANUTS 4.25 

ACORN 400 CAPSULE, ROCKET 

or 100 COUNT GUMMACH. 10.95 
ACORN 6 or 8 LB. GLOBE, 1c 

BALL GUM or CONFECTION 9.95 

SILVER KING, 1c or 5c 4.95 

HALLMARK PEN MACHINES, 

25c 13.50 

SELECTO VEND TAB VENDORS 5.95 
U. S. POSTAGE STAMP 

MACHINES, 5c, 10c Col.. 9.95 

Writ* for catalog on complete lino 

of Bulk Vendor Suppliei 

TITAN VENDOR SUPPLY CO. 

1210 Farman Street Omaha, Nob. 
Phone: 346-1340 



NATIONAL VENDORS' ASSOCIATION 

VEND-O-RAMA 
1963 

SHERATON-CHICAGO HOTEL 
Chicago, EL 

MARCH 28-29-30-31 

"Ckicap Jh the Keif in 63 

. . . and you need to be there 
TO SEE: 

1. NEW MERCHANDISE 

2. NEW EQUIPMENT 

3. NEW METHODS 

TO LEARN: 

1. WHAT PROGRESS HAS BEEN MADE 

2. WHAT OTHER OPERATORS DO 

3. WHAT THE FUTURE HOLDS 

4. NEW IDEAS 



ATTENTION: 

VENDING MACHINE OPERATORS 
VENDING MACHINE DISTRIBUTORS 

A SPECIAL PACKAGE PLAN COVERING ALL 
EVENTS IS AVAILABLE AT 

$15 per person — $25 per couple 

ImIMm 

EXHIBITS 

2 LUNCHEON MEETINGS 

FRIDAY NIGHT PARTY 

SATURDAY BANQUET AND SHOW 

PARTICIPATION IN MYSTERY EVENT . . . 
A DELIGHT OF PRIZES AND SURPRISES 

LADIES' PROGRAM 



REGISTER NOW FOR: 

NATIONAL VENDORS' ASSOCIATION 



rr 



rr 



VEND-O-RAMA '63 



SHERATON-CHICAGO HOTEL, CHICAGO, ILL. 
MARCH 28 THRU 31 

Send in the following blank with your check to: 
JANE MASON 

Exec. Secretary 
1155 N. Cicero Ave., Chicago 51, 111. 



Enclosed find my check 

in the amount of covaring . 



City 



PLASTIC PROCESSES inc., 83 hanse ave., freeport, n.y. 



MARCH 23, 1963 



BILLBOARD 59 



Candy, Mdse. Venders 
Double-Team Passengers 



HAMLET, N. C— Both mer- 
chandise and candy venders arc 
being teamed successfully on a 
large scale by Service Vending 
Company here. 

Under the experimental pro- 
gram which has blossomed out 
into several hundred locations, 
Service Vending Company is 
using two-level step-back stands, 
to combine such odd bedfellows 
as ballpoint pen venders, gum, 
5-cent cashews, charms and con- 
fection mixes. 

In typical bus station location, 
for example, the installation will 
consist of eight machines, in- 
cluding a 25-cent ballpoint pen 
vender in the top row, I -cent 
ball gum, 5-cent pistachio, 1- 
cent and 5-cent charms, a 10- 
cent comb machine, and a 5- 
cent chocolate vender. 

This combination was chosen 
for bus stations, airports and 
railroad terminals, after Service 
Vending surveyed typical travel- 
ers on what items would be 
most likely to attract their coins. 
Men wanted pocket combs. 
Women, on the other hand, are 
perpetually forgetting pens and 
pencils. 

The 5-cent pistachios were 
added simply because this 
Western favorite is something of 
a stranger to Southerners, and 
shows a high sales percentage 
on the basis of curiosity, if 
nothing else. One-cent ball gum, 
of course, is always a stock item, 
while the 5-cent chocolate con- 




A NEW DRY SPRAY LUBRI- 
CANT, an all-in-one cleaner, 
and cue-stick talcum, were in- 
troduced last week by Wlco 
Manufacturing Company 
here. The cleaner, designed 
for on-locarion use, sells for 
$1.29. The lubricant is for 
wood-to-wood or metal-to- 
metal use (wherever oil is 
impractical) and sells for 
$1 .95. The powder, newly 
packaged in IVi -pound cans, 
sells for 50 cents. 



BARGAINS 

FOR THf WltK 
GAMES GAMES 
250 OF THEM 

Received • Large Lot of Drink 
And Coffee Vending Machine! in 
Trad*, also a Large Lot of 
Phonographs. 

WHAT DO YOU NEED I 

1700, ItOO, 1900 a> 1000 Wurilrxer 
Phonograph* af verv low price*. 
Playtime Bowler, to Ft. (435.00 

Jumbo Bowler, H Ft J7S.00 

Bonus Bowler, 1* Ft 425.00 

Bally Strike 149.50 

DuGrenler 13-Col. Clia- 

ratte Vendor? .. u?.so 

Rowe 3700 Cigarette Venders, 

repainted hammertold 

finish end reconditioned 300.00 
We have miiif large bill Bowlers 
for Mlt. as Is. What price do you 
otftr! 

Write or Call Us Collect. 
MAin 1-351 1 




fection was added for the bene- 
fit of the traveler who has very 
little time to visit the associated 
restaurant or snack bar, but will 
cheerfully drop nickels in for a 
bit of sweet-tooth refreshment. 

The odd combination of comb 
and ballpoint venders on stands 
usually reserved only for 1-cent 
or 5-cent machines has worked 
out so well, reports the Service 
organization, that in many in- 
stance^, operators of small-town 
bus lines, after seeing the instal- 
lation in larger terminals, have 
written or telephoned, inviting 
the North Carolina bulk vend- 
ing organization to place similar 
equipment in their stations. 



Seeburg Trio on 
European Trip 

CHICAGO — A trio of top 
Seeburg executives are off on a 
European junket for visits with 
the firm's network of interna- 
tional distributors. Del Coleman, 
board chairman: Bill Adair Jr., 
vice-president in charge of sales, 
and Jack Gordon, executive 
vice-president, will make their 
first stop in Zurich, Switzerland. 



CHICAGO — Bowling and 
shuffleboard pucks in multi- 
colored metal were introduced 
by the Precision Novelty Com- 
pany recently. The pucks come 
in regular and king size, and 
are made of hardened metal, 
ground, polished and chrome 
plated. The color is carried not 
only on the top of the puck but 
throughout the entire outer coat. 



BAR OWNERS LIKE TO 
RECALL WHERE & WHEN 

NEWARK. N. Y. — John Bilotta. local Wurlitzer distributor and 
part owner of Radio Station WACK here, is using the station's 
house organ to promote his "Golden Oldies" programming concept. 

The juke box programming theme is based on the theory that 
most bar patrons tend to get a bit nostalgic after a little conviviality, 
and that they like to hear songs that remind them of their youthful 
exploits. 

By using the Golden Bar selection button on late model Wur- 
litzers, the patron gets 10 best-selling records of the I940's on the 
insertion of 50 cents. 

Some 50 sides are available — five for each year of the decade — 
all of which sold 1 ,000.000 or more copies. 

These records are listed by year, title and artist in the WACK 
weekly house organ, with the information that they appear on juke 
boxes in the Rochester-Syracuse area. 

Illllllllllllllllllllllllllllinillllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllll li!ll, .|,*JI 11,11! IWIIIIIIIIKIUdl lWIIJtlllSNIJIIIIlilllllllUilJIilllillnK.lr HI, JIJIIIII! 



New kiddie-coin attraction earns 



BIG BONUS 




'ITS FUN TO LISTEN TO THE 

FUNPHONE 

II It .4 




in every kiddie-ride location 

Wherever kiddie-rides go ... and in countless locations lacking space for 
kiddie-rides . . . FUN- PHONE earns important money month after 
month... and year after year with periodic low -cost, easy 
change of program. FUN-PHONE is the biggest profit producer 
per square inch of space in the kiddie-amusement class. 



Insert Coin, Pick Up Phone!) 
Hew the M$$ic Story-Teller!) 



Flashy eye-appeal gets quick attention 

FUN-PHONE looks like a wall-type pay -telephone, but in 
the brilliant colors children love. Vivid red coin-box. 
mounted on bright display panel, stops youngsters in 
their tracks . gets quick and continuous play. 



Easy operation pleases kiddies, parents 



Youngest toddler and busiest parent get (he fun-phone 
idea at a glance. When coin is deposited, youngster picks 
up receiver, hears a pleasant voice tell one of a dozen 
clever stories recorded on built-in tape-player, engineered 
to insure clear, distinct sound, ruggedly constructed 
for irouhle-free profitable performance. 



Appeals to wide range of ages 

FUN -PHONfc scripts are based on a variety of themes, from 
famous fairy tales to western and space adventure, but 
popped up with a touch of comic-strip humor that appeals 
10 a wide range of ages. Location tests prove children 
as young as 3 and as old as 12 are alt equally- 
fascinated w ith FI N PHONE. No kiddie-coin attraction 
ever created offers the universal appeal and big earning 
power in small space packed into fun-phone. 



Be first in your jrta to Mart a "junior juit box" rtult with 
FUX PHOXF. . . . a permanent, profitable, pleaxant buiintu with 
unlimited potential for growth. Get FUK PHOSE nou 



See your distributor ... or write BALLY MANUFACTURING COMPANY • 2640 BELMONT AVENUE, CHICAGO 18, ILLINOIS 



60 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 



FOR SALE 

GAMES & BOWLERS 

United Handicap Shuffle . .$ 65.00 
Chicoin Champianihip Shuffle 93.00 

William! Tic-Tjc-Toc 75 00 

■ally Conireti Shuffle .... 95.00 

Concrete Shuffle .... 85 00 

Gottlieb Silling Pretty .... 125.00 
Gottlieb Silver 75.00 

PHONOS 

Wurlitier 3400, 3404, 2410 $545 00 

Wurtltier 2500. 2504. 2510 . 645.00 

Wurlitier 2300 445.00 

Deck-Ola Hide-A-Way 1440 . 75.00 

AMI 6120 . . 265.00 

AMI FI30 175.00 

Seeburg 320 565 00 

Seeburg AO 160! 665.00 

CICARETTE VENDORS 

Smokuhap, 9 column .. S25 00 
Eastern, 22 column 45.00 

Call, Writs or Cabto. 
Cable: LEWJO 
Wo aro now distributors for 
Smokfitiop. and Gottlieb. 



Distributing Co. 
Exclusive Wurlitier Distributor 
130t N. Cipitol Ave. 329 W. Ninth St. 

Mm**. i« 

Tel.: MEItose 5 1593 Tel.: AX I 6969 



2 Denver Operations Merge 




Shown left to right are Don Keys, Marshall Pack, R. F. Jones 
and Sam Keys. The last named is shown signing the contract 
which -made Stereo Music, Inc., a reality in Denver. 



ONCE IN A LIFETIME 
OPPORTUNITY- 
SAVE 

$1335 



on established 
selling price 



SPECIAL PROMOTION 
PACKAGE DEAL 

will eam cost of 
studio in one season. 
Nothing more to buy. 
DEAL INCLUDES: 

The AUTO-VOICE 
MARK V 

NEW in performance 
NEW in design 
PROVEN money maker 

3000 RECORD BLANKS 
1000 MAILING ENVELOPES 

ALL FOR $1600 

FOB Los Angeles 




SPIN RECORDS TO NEW 
PROFITS THIS SEASON! 





AUTO-VOICE STUDIO vends a high quality 
45 rpm one-minute disk recording for only 50c 
— vends a "Custom mailer" envelope for 10c 



NOW - AT THIS SPECIAL PRICE OFFER YOU HAVE A SELF- LIQUI- 
DATING PLAN TO EARN THE PRICE OF THE STUDIO PLUS. IN ONE 
SEASON. ACT TODAY — DON T MISS OUT ON THIS ONCE IN A 
LIFETIME OPPORTUNITY. 

OFFER DEFINITELY CLOSES JUNE 1, 1963 

All orders subject to prior sale on these 50 units. 
Terms: 1/3 with order — balance S/D Bill of lading. 
WIRE - WHITE or TELEPHONE TODAY. 




AUTO-VOICE MANUFACTURED AND WARRANTED BY 



AUTO-PHOTO CO., inc. 

3300 Centra) Avenue, Los Angeles 11, California 



Telephone: ADams 3-6247 



DENVER — A new giant in 
Denver juke box, amusement 
machines, and vending opera- 
tions bowed here last week, as 
Apollo Music Company and 
Stereo Music Company merged. 
Apollo Music Company was 
headed by brothers Sam and 
Dan Keys, who purchased a 
small route formerly operated by 
Draco Sales Company in 1954. 

Stereo Music Company was 
headed by Marshall Pack, a vet- 
eran of many years with R. F. 
Jones Company, who went 
into route operations a little 
more than three years ago. 

Under terms of the merger. 
Sam Keys will serve as presi- 
dent, while Marshall Pack is 
secretary - treasurer. A new 
building is being selected as 
service and executive head- 
quarters. 

500 Units 

The consolidation of the two 
firms boosts the combined string 
to more than 500 units, with 
the emphasis on phonographs, 
but including amusement ma- 
chines, cigaret and other 
venders. 

Apollo Music Company has 
in the past been noted for suc- 
cess in arcade-type amusement 
machine locations, as well as 
departures from standard pro- 
gramming and the extensive 
old-favorite merchandising. 

Under the new title of Stereo 
Music, the firm will have 16 
employees and cover every sec- 



when answering ads . 
Say You Saw It in 
Billboard 



tion of Denver. Jack Hackett 
and Owen Englim will head the 
service departments. 

The switch is expected to im- 
prove the profit picture due to 
centralized control, cutting 
maintenance and service costs, 
fewer trucks and greater effi- 
ciency, according to Sam Keys. 
There will also be greater finan- 
cial strength, of course. 

The new combination began 
operations on March 1, with the 
purchase of several AMI phono- 
graphs from R. F. Jones, head 
of the company bearing his 
name, who was on hand for the 
formal signing of the papers. 



Penna. Community 
Passes License Bill 

ALMONESSON, N. J.— The 
Township Committee has passed 
an amended ordinance in this 
community near Philadelphia 
which licenses juke boxes at $50 
per year and "games of chance" 
at $25. 

"Games of chance" include 
pinballs. 

Under the amendment, chil- 
dren of any age are allowed to 
play selections on the music ma- 
chines and only those 14 
or older can play the games. 
Under the original bill, no one 
under 16 could use any kind of 
coin machine. 




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PHONOGRAPHS 

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SOCK-OLA 147S-200 475 

ROCK. OLA 1448 245 

WURLITZER 2000-200 ... 245 
AMI CONTINENTAL 2-200 745 
AMI CONTINENTAL 1-20O 625 
AMI CONTINENTAL 2-10O 695 

AMI C-200 225 

SEEBURC AY160-SH 945 

5EEBURC AQ160-SH 795 



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Bally BALL PARK $3 75 

Bally HEAVY HITTER 165 

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THE RESPONSE IS TERRIFIC (and International!) TO 
BILLBOARD'S UPCOMING "COIN MACHINE DIRECTORY AND 
WHO'S WHO IN THE COIN MACHINE WORLD." 

Here's one example: 

"Your upcoming Who's Who Book of Coin Machine People is about the most 
refreshing idea that has come along in sometime. I am sure it will be of great 
use to all Coinmen throughout the world. From what it sounds like, it might even 
replace the telephone directory. We look forward to it with great enthusiasm." 

H. Grant 

International Amusement Co. 
Belgian Amusement Co. 

COMING MAY 20th — ANOTHER INDUSTRY SERVICE FROM 



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MARCH 23, 1963 



BILLBOARD 61 



NEW 4 PLAYER MAGIC! 
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COIN MACHINE EXCHANGE 

1411-13 Dlvcruy, Chicso 14, 111. 
BUcUnltiam 1-8211 




If Customer 
Gets Enough, 
Nuts Pay Off 

FLORENCE, S. C. — Five- 
ent cashews, so long as the lo- 
cation is served frequently, and 
a good-sized portion of nuts is 
released, can be the most profit- 
able item on a bulk vending 
route, according to L. S. Guy- 
ton, local operator. 

Guyton has some 50 cashew 
locations, mostly in high-traffic 
spots, such as bus stations, 
railroad stations, department 
stores, super service stations and 
super markets. 

Wherever he has introduced 
cashews on a 5-ccnt vend, he 
has been careful to use selling 
signs which point out "Nothing 
Tastier" — "Try This Flavor." 

Cashews, Guyton points put, 
are a nut item which most peo- 
ple do not taste unless they hap- 
pen to be at a party where 
mixed nuts are being served. 

Guyton found that there were 
invariably complaints from peo- 
ple who felt that they were not 
being given enough cashews in 
return for s nickel, wherever 
they had encountered the ma- 
chines before. 

The solution, the South Caro- 
lina operator decided, was to 
simply shop around for a better 
buy on the tasty nuts, which he 
eventually accomplished. 



i:il!llllll!ll!l!lllllllll!l!llllll!|!lllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIIIII!lin Illllllllllllllllllllll 

760,000 LOCATIONS GO 
UNTAPPED IN KINGDOM 

LONDON — Some 160,000 locations in United Kingdom taverns 
and cafes are unexploited by juke box operators. This is the market 
outlined by Ditchburn Equipment, Ltd., the nation's largest juke 
box distributor. 

Data is contained in a Ditchburn publication, a slick two- 
color give-away for operating prospects, entitled, "How to become 
a successful phonograph operator." 

As glossy as brochures come, the book, with only a mild 
typographical salute to Ditchburn's Music Maker Seeburg juke 
box, spells out economics of juke box operating, with the machine's 
history, to sample profit-and-loss returns. 

Juke boxes and coin-amusement machines comprise as yet one 
of the few UK industries not swamped by semi-insuperable regula- 
tions. And yet there are only 15,000 juke boxes in play. 

Illllllllllllllllllll Illlllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllll^ 



WURLITZER 

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Greatest Money- 
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when answering ads . . 
Say You Saw It in 
Billboard 



Now, 5-cent cashews get the 
benefit of regular replacement 
in every location, since Guyton 
has no locations which are not 
within a few blocks of his 
Florence home. Because they 
arc always fresh, tasty, and 
properly salted by Guyton him- 
self, cashews at 5 cents are 
actually outselling Spanish pea- 
nuts at 1 cent. 



LITTLE ROCK— Dan Levin, 
51, owner of Standard Auto- 
matic Music Corporation, dis- 
tributor of Wurlitzer phono- 
graphs and Bally games, died 
here Sunday. 

He left his wife and two 
teen-age daughters. 

He had been in the business 
since 1941 and was widely 
known among Mid-South music 
and game operators. 



BASEBALL 6AMES 



CUNS 



57 Baseball 1*3 

Pinch Hitter 2*8 

Officii) Baseball 278 

Star Slugger IIS 

Super Slugger 115 

Yankee Baiehail 148 

Mid. Oel. Baseball ... 315 
Keeney League 

Leader 118 

Belly Bis Inning ISO 

Bally Heavy Hitter .. 178 

Bally Ball Perk 345 

Belly Batting Practice 245 
c.c. Bull's-Eve 

Bat* ball 148 

C.C. Super Home Run 9S 




Atomic Bomber . .8100 ; 

Bonui Oun 1*8 

Bally snare Shooter . 150 

Bally Spook 2*8 

Bally BuMVEvr 198 

Bally Gun Smoke .... 1*5 

C.C. Ray Oun 350 1 

C.C. Long Range Gun 450 

Carnlvel 133 , 

Dale Oun 43 

Ix. Space Gun ff 

Cruiader 245 

Genco Super Big Top 1*5 

Genco Nite Fiter 110 | 

Genco Sky Gunner . . 110 
Genco Wild West ... 1*3 I 
Genco Sky Rocket 

I Rifle 148 I 

Genco Gun Club 2*3 

Genco Circus Gun 

1 Rifle 275 

Gun Patrol 110 

Gun Smoke 115 

Hercules 2*5 



Jet Gun 3118 

Genco Big Too , 178 

Keeney Sportsmen .. ISO 
Keeney Air Holder .. ISO 
Mid. Shooting Oall'y.. 178 

Pistol Pet* 73 

Pop Gun Circus 22S 

Pony Express 378 

Poter Hunt 138 

Silver Bullet 118 

Six Shooter 110 

Sharp Shooter 275 

Safari Gun 178 

Soace Glider 393 

State Pair 193 

Seeburg Coon Gun 138 
Squoit Water Gun ... 1*8 

Two Gun Fun 230 

Titan Gun 328 

United Sky Relder . . 350 



135 

United Pirate Gun ... 328 
Mute. Sky Filer 133 



WRITE US FOR OUR NEW PRICE BUL- 
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CLgYgUND COIN 



MACHINE EXCHANGE 

2029 PROSPECT AVE . CLEVELAND 15. 0HI0(>^*-O- 
All Phones: Tower 16715 



1963 




The Original Designers 
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Baseball Games, 





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Players actually run the bases 
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SEE THESE NEW EXCITING New 24 volt system e New "push-pull" latch mechanism for 

FEATURES IN WILLIAMS f front molding • New Relays • New motor operated target 

NEW 1963 BASEBALL GAME I reset • New "brushed nickel" front door and frame. 



62 BILLBOARD 



MARCH 23, 1963 



NEW ROWE AMi Return of Winter Freezes Ops 



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engineering developments for sim- 
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Division of Automatic CantMn Company of America 
18 So. Michigan Ave., Chicago 3, III. 



NEW for '63! 

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333 Morton St. Bay City. Mlehlean 





CHICAGO — Juke box collec- 
tions dipped as winter again 
came on like a bear throughout 
the Midwest. After a week or 
two of scattered sunshine, the 
area was hit by one of the worst 
snowstorms of the winter. 

Operators again spent more 
time retrenching and making 
agonized service calls than in 
concentrating on new records. 

Despite the relatively soft pic- 
ture, however, several new sin- 
gles emerged as breakouts in the 
juke box market. 

Both Singer One-Stop and 
Music Box cited "Pipe Line," by 
the Chantays on Dot and "Bony 
Moronic," by the Appalachians 
on ABC-Paramount. 

The second tune is interesting 
in that it's the same one written 
by Larry Williams and recorded 
by Williams on Specialty some 
years ago. The version by the 
Appalachians has more of a 
"Walk Right In" sound. 

Singer is also moving "Don't 
Say Nothin' Bad," by the Cook- 
ies on Dimension, a rock and 
roll tear-jerker and "Winter 



Love," by Bill Pursell on Colum- 
bia, breaking into r.&b. loca- 
tions after selling well in pop 
spots for about a month. 

Generally the trend is re- 
versed — from r.&b. to pop — but 
in this case, the disk is perform- 
ing very similarly to a record by 
Ruby and the Romantics, "Our 
Day Will Come" on Kapp, 
which likewise broke pop and 



went r.&b. The latter tune has 
been out for about a month. 

At Music Box, Russ DiAngelo 
cited good action on the follow- 
ing: "Mecca," Gene Pitney, Mu- 
sicor; "Hot Pastrami," the Dar- 
tells. Dot; "Baby Workout," 
Jackie Wilson, Brunswick; "Sax 
Fifth Avenue," Johnny Bcecher 
on Warner Bros, and "Blue," 
Jack Reno on Fonograph. 



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AROUND ARKANSAS 

The racing season at the 
Oaklawn track at Hot Springs 
drew a lot of phonograph and 
game operators who are horse 
race enthusiasts from all over 
the Mid-South. Seen recently at 
the track were: Harold Duna- 
way, Twin City Amusement 
Company, Little Rock; Cecil 
Hill, Hill Amusement Company, 
Little Rock; J. Earl GUI, Gill 
Amusement Company, Hot 
Springs, and Orell Bledsoe, Na- 
tional Novelty Company, El Do- 
rado. 

Also attending the races were 
Joe Michie, Gay Amusement 
Company, Blytheville, Ark.; 
Paul Mauceli, Paul's Novelty 
Company, Greenville, Miss.; 
Billy Foster, Foster Music Com- 
pany, Pine Bluff, Ark., and 
these from Memphis: Drew 
Canale, Canale Enterprises, Inc.; 
Robert Crump, vice-president of 
E. H Crump & Company, and 
Ben Gay, official of U. S. Royal 
Tire Company, friends of 
Canale. 

Chester Baker, Baker Amuse- 
ment Company, Pine Bluff, re- 
ports his area continues to pros- 



per from industrial development, 
and his business is good. . . . 
Wayne Cartiller, B & C Amuse- 
ment Company, Forrest City, 
drove the 50 miles to Memphis 
recently on a shopping trip for 
equipment. . . . Nathan Wheel- 
ess, Service Amusement Com- 
pany, Blytheville, Ark., a ball 
of fire in the business, is on 
the go day and night, was seen 
recently putting some new pho- 
nographs on location. 

Lester E. Godwin, Godwin 
Music Company, Texarkana and 
Hope, Ark., is expanding his 



Bill Would Stiffen 
Tobacco Fines 

SACRAMENTO — A bill to 
inflict penalities for furnishing 
tobacco to persons under 18 
years old has been introduced in 
the California Legislature here 
by Sen. Sam Geddes of Napa 
County. 

Fine for conviction would be 
increased from $25 to $100. A 
dealer found guilty of not post- 1 
ing a copy of the State law 
against sale of tobacco to minors 
would be fined $25 instead of I 
$5. 



music and game route into 
coffee vending and other phases 
of vending. He thinks there is 
great potential in vending. . . . 
Charles A. Stewart, executive 
secretary of Arkansas Music Op- 
erators Association, Little Rock, 
is spending a lot of time at the 
Legislature these days. His main 
interest is to work against any 
adverse legislation which would 
affect the industry. None has 
been passed so far. 

ELTON WHISENHUNT 



AMERICAN 9' SHUFFLEBOARDS . 
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Midway Shooting Oat. 195 

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BRAVISSIMO: Popular Columbia Records in- 
ternational singing group, Los Cinco Latinos, 
are presented with an achievement award 
by Peter de Rougemont for record sales pass- 
ing the 1 million mark. Presentation was 
during Argentina reception. 





EARL OF KING: Alto sax man Earl Bostic is 
re-signed to King Records, Inc., by General 
Manager Hal Neely. King has had Bostic 
under exclusive contract for over 10 years, 
with brief hiatus to DeLuxe, which is King- 
owned. 



POLL KING: Shown receiving the Billboard Award as 
the deejays' choice for Most Promising Instrumental 
Group in 1962 is King Curtis (center). Making the pres- 
entation is Billboard's Frank Luppino, while Capitol's 
Manny Kellem beams approval. 



BLOODY RARE: "Don't Put Onions on Your 
Hamburger" is the Big Top single that Mod's 
Alfred E. Newman (right) is plugging from his 
new album, "Fink Along With Mad." In for 
a treat is Charlie Greer (WABC) and promo- 
tion man Sal Licata. 




BEARD'S BEER: 
Al Hirt pauses 
for a long 
draught of beer 
to sustain him 
until he opens 
at Las Vegas' 
Rivera Hotel 
(25). 





STAND-IN: Robert Weiss receives Billboard 
trophy on behalf of Emilio Pericoli for the 
Best Foreign Song of 1962, "Al Di la." Han- 
dling the presentation is Mike Maitland, 
president of Warner Bros. Records. Weiss will 
be winging the award back to Italy where 
he will in turn present the trophy to its right- 
ful owner. 



FEET FIRST: Vee Jay sponsored a recent 
Manhattan "Walk Like a Man" hike. Among 
survivors were (upper I. to r.) Vernon De 
Meyer, Tony De Angelis and Lennie Sultan; 
(lower I. to r.) Sweets Goulavaris, with Vee 
Jay reps Fred Perri and Pat Marlowe. Other 
than Vee Jay personnel, hikers were Man- 
hattan record shopkeeps. 



FOREIGN AWARD: Billboard's man in Uru- 
guay, Alberto Maravi, accepts two Discometro 
De Oro for American artists Chubby Checker 
and Bobby Darin from Mauricio Brenner, 
president of Fermata (Argentina), during re- 
cent Festival there. 




WINNING TUNESMITH: Recipient of Most Successful Com- 
poser Award goes to Uruguay's Osiris Rodriguez Castillos. 
Joining in the tribute are (I. to r.) Juan D'Arieno (RCA), 
Panchito Note (Vic), Douglas Taylor (CBS Argentina) and 
Mauricio Brenner (Fermata). 



COMER: Odeon's Ramona Galarza is awarded 
Discometro De Oro as most promising singer 
during 1962 by Billboard's Alberto Maravi. 
Attending are Ricardo Gioscia (right) from 
Palacio de la Musica and Odeon's Argentine 
rep Fernando Lopez. 




Ah So ... Is Next #/ HMTH 



AL AMON 

1APAN* '(IS RAISIN 

b/w "K-K-KATY" Tishman # 



-WEST COAST CHART BOUND- 

I'M NOT IN LOVE (NO MORE)" b/w "A LITTLE LOVE" nsh».. #902 

By NICKY ROB BINS 

HMAJM RECORD COMPANY, 1717 No. Vine St., Hollywood 28, Calif. HO 2-9555